Adapted lenses and IBIS: always only three axes of stabilization?

mike3996

Hall of Famer
Location
Finland

Alik Griffin just posted an article how three axes of stabilization is the best you can get when you adapt a foreign lens to a modern mirrorless camera.

I think the reasoning seems rather sound. He does make a mistake thinking Nikon's F lenses don't communicate focus distance to the camera even if they've done that since AF-D. I don't think it changes any conclusions regarding Nikon Z system, though.

What do you think?

I've been thinking about the combination of legacy lenses and IBIS a little bit recently. Panasonic cameras have the best system where you get to specify your FL right upon mounting a lens or turning on the camera. But perhaps the playing field is leveled if no IBIS system can get to maximum potential with adapted glass -- perhaps don't worry so much and just enjoy what's there?
 

mike3996

Hall of Famer
Location
Finland
Separate "issue" I have, in theory, tangenting the IBIS.

I have a couple legacy zoom lenses I might see adapting on a MILC.

IBIS is a super useful thing to have but with such a zoom it can also prove to be a headache. What to do? Disable IBIS altogether when zooming around? I fear it would only lead me to avoid using the zooms that I have.

Do I solve this problem by getting such MILC cameras from my wishlist that have no IBIS? ;) :D
 

rayvonn

Hall of Famer
Location
London
I have gone for the half way house method of getting a longish 100-400m zoom with stabilisation. But I think a lot of it comes down to the camera. The long zooms have traditionally been built with big DSLR’s in mind and with those sort of cameras, stabilisation doesn’t come in to the thought process so much, more so weight/ balance which is obviously more of an issue with the lighter mirrorless offerings these days. Even with stablilisation, best results will still be gleaned from a monopod/ tripod when using the long zooms. Not my idea of fun but, I must admit, it’s probably the best method for superior output when you don’t have stabilisation.
 
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