Philosophy Album Organization (Flickr, etc.)

Location
Seattle
Name
Andrew
This may or may not be something you think about, but I have been mulling over how to make my Flickr albums more presentable. Yes, I am somewhat of a dinosaur who still uses Flickr, mainly because it doesn't have a lot of the other rigmarole that many of the image hosting and sharing sites have. So this might be a little specific to Flickr, or it may not.

I have observed many different styles for naming and sorting images between albums. Some people have albums for every camera they use, or every lens, or both... some make albums for time periods, some for locations, some for themes. I've previously been a little all over, with some lens albums, some body/format albums, and some thematic ones. As time passes I get a little less interested in the gear-centric sorting and a little more into thematic sorting, which I view as a good thing; maybe it means I am getting over some of my gearheadedness and concentrating a little more on what my photos "say." Hopefully so.

That doesn't mean that I don't have any place for sorting photos based on gear, however. One of the things I really like about Flickr's albums is that you can put images into multiple albums - as many as you want, actually. I could become a completionist with Flickr albums and have everything sorted into lens, body, format, theme, subject, location... the possibilities are limitless. Paralysis of choice takes over.

I've mentioned before that I like to use Flickr to cull photos, and my images there are a sort of constantly refining idea of what I want to present. Some of what's there really shouldn't be, but I'm attached to the photos for one reason or another. Sometimes I put images up which are "of a time" in terms of post-processing style, and I need revisit them when I grow out of/refine/replace stylistic choices. Sometimes I will post a larger quantity of images from, say, a particular piece of gear which I've just gotten or something I am testing.

I have been refining my albums as well as my images. I've come up with a system which I think I like, which is at present only 14 albums, separated into medium (or format), theme and subject. Medium encompasses gear, but also compresses it (for example, my previous M4/3 albums are all under the Micro Four Thirds (Medium) album now. There were a few gear pieces for which it still made more sense to leave in an album of their own (the K-1 II, for example - other possibilities for these images would be "Pentax," which should logically contain images made with film Pentax gear, then, or "Full-frame," which isn't specific enough since I have only owned one FF digital body). The Ricoh GRII and GRIII are currently grouped together, while the GRIIIx is in its own album. That might change.

I've got a couple location albums, each in the subject category. Street photography likewise falls under subject, as does a new album I'm calling "The Banal" which groups most of my snapshot-style images where there is not a strong subject or theme. This has freed up theme for a few more specific albums. I've had a couple which I called "Environs" and "Frontiers" for a long time, possibly my longest album titles still in rotation. I never consciously thought of these as centered on theme before now, but I realized that they are: Environs is not street photography, but is centered thematically on the evidence of the human element in my surroundings, while Frontiers is where my landscape stuff goes, with a bit of thematic focus on this being the edge of the frequented, the well-known, and the beginning of what lies outside of strong human control.

Thematic albums also allow me to focus on a couple of my longtime themes a little more strongly, namely "Urban Unquiet" (like the thread here) and "Rural Light" which is a recent development of my small-town and rural shots (which feel more focused now that I don't live in a very rural area anymore).

Is there a point to all this? Maybe, maybe not. I like feeling organized, and I think this is part of me slowly moving to more focused and intentional types of photography - VERY slowly, because that is not how I naturally work. Realistically, while my Flickr albums are public, this is mostly for me (because who else is as odd as me, and intentionally goes into a user's album list to evaluate what it is that they're doing with their choice of albums?). It may be just a diversion, but I am hoping that it actually helps direct my creative thought when I'm shooting photos. If you read through all this, thanks for reading, and if it was completely irrelevant to what you do or how you think, then I apologize for taking up the time. If it stirs up any thoughts, I'm interested to hear them!
 
Andrew, you have my sympathy!

Organisation is what I do for other people!

I'm badly behind with just keywording. Spending the last 6 weeks in hospital and Hospital in the Home has not helped one little bit ...

At least I'm now kitted out with the chargers and leads that I need for hospital to keep my smart watch, phone and tablet operational. One charger and three leads - 2x PD USB-C plus one 18W USB-A outlets. All my other chargers have leads that are USB-A to USB-C, and they are too short, at 1m long. It's not realistic to dangle a 250gm phone or 750gm+ tablet off the charging cable! Or have three chargers ...

The new charger has the capacity to simultaneously fast charge all three items over 2m and 3m USB-C leads, with the watch dangling.

Whether albums or charging, suitable organisation is the key.
 
I try to apply the KISS theory, whether it actually is is another matter. Flickr for me acts as a sort of backup of my finished images so there's no culling, but I do apply 3 steps:

1) Tag with anything that I know will make me search an image quicker and this is quite effective, for example say if I see an image in Cameraderie's "Post an image of yours related to the one above it" thread that's red, I can search "Red" in my Flickr page, and everything I've tagged "Red" will come up, I can download any one of those images and post it here in the thread; so for me it works and I tag each image with anything that comes to mind, I dunno, like "car"/ "Landscape"/ "Red" and so on, it's not hard because its instinctive.

2) Each image goes into 4 albums being Camera/Lens/Place where photo was taken, say London, New York, Cape Town etc, then year. This is very easily and quickly done in Flickr when uploading a load of images.

3) Each image also goes into whatever Flickr group I want it to.

Well it works for me anyway, I can find anything and quickly via search and notwithstanding that I know where to look.
 
I try to apply the KISS theory, whether it actually is is another matter. Flickr for me acts as a sort of backup of my finished images so there's no culling, but I do apply 3 steps:

1) Tag with anything that I know will make me search an image quicker and this is quite effective, for example say if I see an image in Cameraderie's "Post an image of yours related to the one above it" thread that's red, I can search "Red" in my Flickr page, and everything I've tagged "Red" will come up, I can download any one of those images and post it here in the thread; so for me it works and I tag each image with anything that comes to mind, I dunno, like "car"/ "Landscape"/ "Red" and so on, it's not hard because its instinctive.

2) Each image goes into 4 albums being Camera/Lens/Place where photo was taken, say London, New York, Cape Town etc, then year. This is very easily and quickly done in Flickr when uploading a load of images.

3) Each image also goes into whatever Flickr group I want it to.

Well it works for me anyway, I can find anything and quickly via search and notwithstanding that I know where to look.
Sensible. Only one wrinkle on that method for me and my own website, Tim.

I try to remember to apply keyword/s, title and description in Bridge to images before uploading, Tim, as doing so after uploading is a real PITA. This also avoids having to do this painful process twice.
 
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