Fuji Another Fuji Full-Frame X camera rumor?

zapatista

Veteran
Location
Denver, Colorado
Real Name
Mike
just because fuji comes out with a x-pro successor that's FF (assuming they do) doesn't mean you're neither forced to change over or leave - just continue forward with their apsc line. it's not going to be the end of the world, is it?

(Sent from another Galaxy via Tapatalk.)

If they go FF I'm sure there will be some adapter for the the existing APS-C lenses or they could pull a Sony and make the mount compatible (not a really good idea).
 

ean10775

All-Pro
Location
Cleveland, Ohio
Real Name
Eric
If they go FF I'm sure there will be some adapter for the the existing APS-C lenses or they could pull a Sony and make the mount compatible (not a really good idea).

I think the only way that would work is if the FF camera shot them in a crop mode, but then what's the point? If new FF lenses were released surely they could be made to also work on the APSC cameras but they wouldn't be optimized for those cameras with regard to size. You can shoot a Canon 35mm f1.4 on a Rebel SL1 but it's way larger than it would need to be


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

CaptZoom

Veteran
Agreed... I am wondering if maybe they saw how many people jumped on the A7 and A7R for adapting Leica and other manual focus lenses and decided it was worth it for Fuji financially to develop their own FF mirrorless based on that.

There certainly seems to a lot pent up demand for a compact FF camera body that accepts RF lenses. My dream FF camera would have the size advantage of the Leica M/Sony A7, Fuji control layout for main controls (the dials) combined with Leica's subtle enhancements (being able to disable the time release, but when in timed release the shutter release is hyper sensitive, etc), Leica menu system, Olympus/Pentax's robust weather sealing, tilting LCD, good implementation for manual focus and/or focus aids, clean ISO at least up to 800 (I'm limited to 160 now with the M9s), and a flash sync speed of at least 1/250, preferably 1/360). I don't think this camera will be made, but I can dream, can't I? [<FUJI are you listening?]
 

CaptZoom

Veteran
Why does anyone give this so-called rumor any credence?

Because there's a lot of demand for small FF sensor camera that can accept virtually any lens ever made, at least in the online community.

--- --- ---

Admittedly I'm not terribly current on the Sony FF mirrorless cameras, but weren't/aren't there a number of issues with IQ related to using M glass on these bodies (especially the wide angle lenses)? SNIP[/

There are issues.
Some of those issues (color smearing) also exist in Leica bodies but Leica bodies correct for these; with the Sony, a few extra steps are required in post.
Other issues (detail smearing/edge smearing) don't happen in Leica bodies but there are trade offs. The Leica M series uses weak infrared cut filters on the the sensors. This helps preserves edge detail at the expense of IR contamination. The IR contamination manifesting in portraiture (especially on Caucasian skin) is a pain in the @** to clean up (assuming color photography).
 

CaptZoom

Veteran
I would only be interested in FF if they can perform some magic and keep the body and lens sizes and weight similar to the current line up.[SNIP]

They can, if the lens don't have autofocus motor and or image stabilization. Would I buy into such a system? Yes I would. In fact, I already have. Does this makes sense for the overwhelming majority of photographers, probably not.
 

CaptZoom

Veteran
In other words, belief in a rumor is based on wishful thinking.

Exactly. Less than a year ago, it was wishful thinking to expect a crop sensor mount being used for a FF sensor.

In any case, Fuji's on record stating they'll eventually compete in the FF market. I think this is still a few years away.
 

RJM

New Member
Location
Nr Cardiff, Wales, UK
Real Name
Bob Morgans
The Fuji CEO has gone on record during a video interview saying Fuji have no plans to make a full frame camera.

I doubt there's anything in this rumour as a result of what he said. He's no reason to lie.
 

Ray Sachs

Legend
Location
Not too far from Philly
Real Name
you should be able to figure it out...
The Fuji CEO has gone on record during a video interview saying Fuji have no plans to make a full frame camera.

I doubt there's anything in this rumour as a result of what he said. He's no reason to lie.

I don't know if there's anything to the rumor either, but I wouldn't say he has no reason to lie...

If he leaked that Fuji is working on a full frame ILC model with a new line of lenses for it, some number of current Fuji users would just STOP buying lenses for the APS model in anticipation of the full frame model. And probably drop thoughts of upgrading their Fuji bodies too. If he says that Fuji has no plans to make a full frame camera, people go on buying the APS gear and then when the full frame model drops, most of the same people who would have bought a full frame Fuji still will, but in the meantime they've still been buying lenses and maybe bodies for the APS system. They might be upset with him for a minute for misleading them, but if the full frame gear is good, they'll get over that pretty quickly. They may or may not be working on a full frame camera or system, but if they are, they have every reason not to leak it until shortly before it's ready to be released...

-Ray
 

jloden

All-Pro
Real Name
Jay
The Fuji CEO has gone on record during a video interview saying Fuji have no plans to make a full frame camera.

I doubt there's anything in this rumour as a result of what he said. He's no reason to lie.

He actually said "we have no plans to make a full frame camera just now" - subtle but important distinction there :wink:

That aside, I still say this rumor would be pretty surprising if it turned out to be true. I agree with all the reasons why I'd rather Fuji stay focused on their existing excellent APS-C X system lineup... but I'd still be more than happy to buy a FF Fuji with an M mount adapter for my own selfish reasons!
 

Landshark

PhotoDog
Location
SoCal
Real Name
Bob
I honestly do not understand the constant clamoring for another full frame camera system, especially one built around manual focus lenses. Buy a film camera and a scanner, one may say using film is dying but the number of photographers wanting a full frame manual focus system camera is only slightly larger. Where is everyone using these full frame images or are we just counting pixels. Just thinking of the amount of storage space one needs every time you step up in image size is crazy and if that does not matter to you there is a lot of good medium format digital cameras out there that have become very cheap because they are not the latest tech or have the newest chip.
 

jloden

All-Pro
Real Name
Jay
I honestly do not understand the constant clamoring for another full frame camera system, especially one built around manual focus lenses. Buy a film camera and a scanner, one may say using film is dying but the number of photographers wanting a full frame manual focus system camera is only slightly larger. Where is everyone using these full frame images or are we just counting pixels. Just thinking of the amount of storage space one needs every time you step up in image size is crazy and if that does not matter to you there is a lot of good medium format digital cameras out there that have become very cheap because they are not the latest tech or have the newest chip.

It's doubtless a small market, but the Sony A7/A7R showed that there *is* a market for such a camera. Bear in mind there would be AF lenses for the camera, the M mount adapter would simply offer more adapted lens options in the short term - just like it has for m4/3, Sony, and Fuji in the past when they launched new mirrorless systems.

Also: it's not about pixels or image size/resolution, it's about FOV. If you're using lenses built for 35mm sized sensors (or film), crop factor is often a hindrance, particularly at the wide to normal end.

And no, I don't want to buy a film camera and a scanner. :biggrin: I'd rather not deal with carrying around half a dozen or more rolls of film, loss of live view, developing film, scanning images, dust removal, and limiting my digital post-processing latitude. Sure it's a bit anachronistic to use manual focus lenses, but you can easily make use of plenty of modern technology at the same time. To each their own.
 

Ranger Rick

Regular
Location
Tempe, AZ
Real Name
Rick
It's doubtless a small market, but the Sony A7/A7R showed that there *is* a market for such a camera. Bear in mind there would be AF lenses for the camera, the M mount adapter would simply offer more adapted lens options in the short term - just like it has for m4/3, Sony, and Fuji in the past when they launched new mirrorless systems.

Also: it's not about pixels or image size/resolution, it's about FOV. If you're using lenses built for 35mm sized sensors (or film), crop factor is often a hindrance, particularly at the wide to normal end.

And no, I don't want to buy a film camera and a scanner. :biggrin: I'd rather not deal with carrying around half a dozen or more rolls of film, loss of live view, developing film, scanning images, dust removal, and limiting my digital post-processing latitude. Sure it's a bit anachronistic to use manual focus lenses, but you can easily make use of plenty of modern technology at the same time. To each their own.


Bob said "...medium format digital cameras....", thus no film/scanning, etc involved in his comment.
 

Landshark

PhotoDog
Location
SoCal
Real Name
Bob
I guess my real point is, it just seems to me that many times we get caught up in the tech and technique of photography and forget what end result is supposed to be, a great image.
Honestly does any body outside of the photo world and forums really care what was used to make the image? Nobody will notice whether it was manually focused or not and truthfully I still cannot relate to wanting to manually focus when one has a very quick and accurate auto focus system available.
The Sony cameras while setup to work with legacy lens were made to also use their line of AF lenses too, it just they are always slow to expand their lens line.

It reminds me of the now more than ever dying debate of using a manual transmission vs double clutch paddle shifter transmission in a sports car, there is not a car made that is faster with the manual. Some people enjoy the fact that their skill with a manual shift is better than others but no matter how skillful they are , they will always be slower and less efficient than the double clutch paddle shifter.

I have been shooting for a long time, most of that time with completely manual cameras and cannot begin to tell you how much I enjoy using modern technology.
This even though I still own all sorts of manual film cameras, everything from Nikon rangefinders and slrs to Leica rangefinders, 8X10, $x5 and a slew of medium format stuff.

Because of my manual background I am still stuck in using my modern camera in a semi auto way, moving the autofocus spot to where I want and not using face detect, setting my ISO instead of Auto Iso, using Aperture preferred instead of Program, etc.
 

jloden

All-Pro
Real Name
Jay
[...]
Nobody will notice whether it was manually focused or not and truthfully I still cannot relate to wanting to manually focus when one has a very quick and accurate auto focus system available.

[...]

It reminds me of the now more than ever dying debate of using a manual transmission vs double clutch paddle shifter transmission in a sports car, there is not a car made that is faster with the manual.

Well there you go. I drive an automatic transmission truck now, but I owned a manual transmission sports car before that (and loved it). :biggrin:

I can't speak for anybody else, but as far as I'm concerned it has nothing to do with anybody else viewing the photo or caring about how it was made... just me and my personal experience of shooting.

Don't misunderstand, I use AF all the time. As far as I'm concerned it's not a 'this or that' question, it's both. I own a couple manual focus lenses, and a boatload of great AF-capable native lenses. I'm not a luddite by any means (heck, I work in the technology industry). I just enjoy a bit of manual focus with a quality optic now and then. Just like I enjoy the *process* of driving a manual transmission sports car because it's fun, or how I carve wooden spoons with knives, even though a bandsaw and power sander is faster.

To be clear... I actually agree with you Bob, I don't think the current FF craze is 'necessary' for many people, myself included. And heck, I probably wouldn't suggest Fuji build this rumored camera for my uses either, as I think it's a niche market inside an already small niche. But IF they did, I certainly wouldn't complain - haha!
 

Landshark

PhotoDog
Location
SoCal
Real Name
Bob
Well there you go. I drive an automatic transmission truck now, but I owned a manual transmission sports car before that (and loved it). :biggrin:

I can't speak for anybody else, but as far as I'm concerned it has nothing to do with anybody else viewing the photo or caring about how it was made... just me and my personal experience of shooting.

Don't misunderstand, I use AF all the time. As far as I'm concerned it's not a 'this or that' question, it's both. I own a couple manual focus lenses, and a boatload of great AF-capable native lenses. I'm not a luddite by any means (heck, I work in the technology industry). I just enjoy a bit of manual focus with a quality optic now and then. Just like I enjoy the *process* of driving a manual transmission sports car because it's fun, or how I carve wooden spoons with knives, even though a bandsaw and power sander is faster.

To be clear... I actually agree with you Bob, I don't think the current FF craze is 'necessary' for many people, myself included. And heck, I probably wouldn't suggest Fuji build this rumored camera for my uses either, as I think it's a niche market inside an already small niche. But IF they did, I certainly wouldn't complain - haha!
Understood, I just think sometimes one needs to be careful for what you wish for, I would hate to see Fuji lose their intrest in support such a great camera system in order to chase a very small part of the overall photo public. A great example is that Leica almost went out of business because of the feeling they need to chase the SLR market back in the day, and I still have doubts about their investment in their medium format camera, it still feels wrong.
 

Armanius

Bring Jack back!
Location
Houston, Texas
Real Name
Jack
It reminds me of the now more than ever dying debate of using a manual transmission vs double clutch paddle shifter transmission in a sports car, there is not a car made that is faster with the manual. Some people enjoy the fact that their skill with a manual shift is better than others but no matter how skillful they are , they will always be slower and less efficient than the double clutch paddle shifter.

Depending on the car, I might disagree! :)
 

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