Fuji Another Fuji Full-Frame X camera rumor?

Landshark

PhotoDog
Location
SoCal
Real Name
Bob
Depending on the car, I might disagree! :)
Ferrari, Lambo, Mclaren, Buggati, Porsche GT3 and Turbo, GTR all only paddle shifters now. Other cars that still offer both stick and dual clutch paddle shifte, double clutch is faster, the VWR or GTI, BMW exM3 now M4. After driving and owning a fast dual clutch paddle shift car, I have no desire to ever manually shift again.
But then again to each his own
 

CaptZoom

Veteran
But it isn't all about speed, is it? Undoubtably, it's about speed for most but I *like* a manual shifter. I like the experience of it. Enjoying the experience of a thing is key for me. I like manual focusing. (Un)fortunately [depending on your point of view] my manual focus glass is designed for full frame sensor/medium, and in crop mode all sorts of undesirable characteristics get exaggerated. Some people notice them, others do not- what is important (to me) is that I *do*. Some of these lenses are excellent on crop body sensors. These same lenses are peerless on a suitable full frame sensor. My clients/audience doesn't know nor do they care* how the image was taken; but I do. Again, it goes back to enjoying the experience of doing a thing.

*Actually my clients do care what gear is used for their project. They want to know that "professional" cameras were used to create images for their catalogs/designs etc. Usually this means whipping out my ancient Canon 40D with a monstrosity of a lens attached to illustrate the "professional-ness" of my gear. And then using my tiny (comparatively) FF manual focus camera to do the actual work.

PS. I'm pretty sure some big whig from Fuji going on record to say they'll eventually have to compete in the full frame market, so that is something they're looking at doing. I'll see if I can dig up a link to it.
 

CaptZoom

Veteran
Toshihisa Iida (senior sales and marketing manager at Fujifilm) briefly talks about the high and professional end of the market being the focus for Fuji rather than the low end. Full interview here.


Q. "Do you you want to compete against professional full-frame cameras?"

A. "Inevitably yes, we have to compete against full-frame. The professional market is very segmented, and for example for sports photography I think the X-T1 is already competitive. So yes, I’d like to challenge full-frame."
 

cwolffensperger

Regular
Location
Iceland
Real Name
Chris Wolffensperger
Well especially the last question is answered clear I think..

'At the moment we’re focusing on the APS-C format but in the longer term, after we’ve completed our lens lineup… I can’t deny the possibility. '

So, eventually it'll come..
 

CaptZoom

Veteran
To be fair, that wording is ambiguous. Pro and high end market focus and challenging full frame is not the same as bringing to market a full-frame offering.

Well especially the last question is answered clear I think..

'At the moment we’re focusing on the APS-C format but in the longer term, after we’ve completed our lens lineup… I can’t deny the possibility. '

So, eventually it'll come..

My take away from that brief interview is that FF is on Fuji's radar (or in the crosshairs), but it's nothing to worry about for the next few (several?) years.
 

Landshark

PhotoDog
Location
SoCal
Real Name
Bob
*Actually my clients do care what gear is used for their project. They want to know that "professional" cameras were used to create images for their catalogs/designs etc. Usually this means whipping out my ancient Canon 40D with a monstrosity of a lens attached to illustrate the "professional-ness" of my gear. And then using my tiny (comparatively) FF manual focus camera to do the actual work.


For my clients in this case ff cameras are not enough, and we shoot medium format cameras instead. When they do not require the resolution of medium format they do not seem to care if it is shot on FF or APS-C
While understand that shooting with lenses designed for one format on another format are not ideal, ones is only doing that because you would like to not because you need too.
For me the use of legacy glass on anything it was not designed to work with I have no interest in at all, If I wanted to use vintage Leica or Nikkor lenses I shoot them on those original bodies with film.
Just like the car analogy again if I want to cruise around in some vintage sports cars I enjoy the shifting experience, but with a modern cart I enjoy driving them to the max, so that instead of worrying about shifting manually with a clutch and rev matching I can concentrate on my line , car balance and braking. After my last stick I find no advantage or excitement using one in a modern sports car.
I manually focused for over 30 years I no longer find the pleasure in it.

One last point I guess I started this because I just see so many discussions about what everybody thinks they need or want on modern cameras, they debate AF speed and accuracy needs, low light chip abilities, manual focus aids for using legacy glass, tilt screens, number of function buttons, menu style, FF-APS-C and M4/3, that it makes me wonder when or what are we shooting. I rejoice in what modern cameras can do because other than for a few exceptions it makes taking the images I want easier and more importantly shoot in ways that were unavailable in the past.

But as I said many times to each his own
 

CaptZoom

Veteran
I wish I got to use MF more often (only get to do it two or three times a year).

The car analogy is curious, because unlike cameras you don't often get to use your car to the max.

Also bring need (vs want) into the equation leads to some interesting queries, especially considering modern/current advanced P&S cameras cover the needs of the overwhelming majority of camera users- yet many choose to opt for more complex systems. There really isn't anything wrong with these choices; people like purchasing systems they enjoy using (at least I hope they do). Because I like manual focus doesn't make it wrong that others like auto focus. I don't need to prove the superiority of one over the other to rationalize my choice. As it is, the company that caters to my wants is the one that gets my money. Fuji is starting to come close to what I want, which is why they're starting to earn my business. When they (if ever) release a FF product that can handle the glass I own (a collection that will grow not shrink), they will earn a lot more business from me.
 

Landshark

PhotoDog
Location
SoCal
Real Name
Bob
The car analogy is curious, because unlike cameras you don't often get to use your car to the max.

.
I would throw out there most people do not use their camera to the max very often either. Mostly happy snaps which you are right is easily done with a P&S or smart phone
 

CaptZoom

Veteran
I would throw out there most people do not use their camera to the max very often either. Mostly happy snaps which you are right is easily done with a P&S or smart phone

Agreed. Though I tend to push my (photography) gear to its limits. The motorcycle on the other hand, stays well within its limits.
 

Ray Sachs

Legend
Location
Not too far from Philly
Real Name
you should be able to figure it out...
Agreed. Though I tend to push my (photography) gear to its limits. The motorcycle on the other hand, stays well within its limits.

Yes, much less likely to die from pushing a camera 10% farther than it's capable of going!

Almost any piece of gear I buy for any pursuit is capable of far more than I'll ever be. An exception might be my toaster, but have you SEEN some if those modern toasters?!?! :D

-Ray
 

Landshark

PhotoDog
Location
SoCal
Real Name
Bob
All joking aside, this thread has got me thinking about how little I use most of the things I own at their to their full potential. That being said I also now recognize how much more fun it is to drive my car at only half of its max potential as compared to driving my wife’s Prius at it’s max
 

ImageNation

Rookie
Location
Brooklyn, NY
Real Name
Rob
I wonder...............having mis-spent a portion of my youth selling cameras at retail, back when there were more camera stores.... anyway.

My experience always was that people who are using the stuff to turn a buck are far more realistic and less susceptible to hype (if not wishful thinking), than folks to whom photography is a piXXXXg contest about who has the best camera/lens/flash/camera bag. etc. The guys to whom it is size contest are usually the ones who buy the volume that justifies production!!!

When I was working with art directors when I was in the pre-press world - I was amazed at the pre-conceived notions (lack of real knowledge of how numbers tranalated into "quality" - but they were mostly prepared to be educated......

Editors (and we are talking fashion, home and women's mags, published by a certain midwestern company). Were usually impossible.

When I got a chance to go to the real HQ of said publishing empire, and was shown the real workflow that took chrome to page, I was slightly horrified....... But as the head of pre-press told me, we mid`westerners are bs averse).

Just an observation.
 

Ray Sachs

Legend
Location
Not too far from Philly
Real Name
you should be able to figure it out...
All joking aside, this thread has got me thinking about how little I use most of the things I own at their to their full potential. That being said I also now recognize how much more fun it is to drive my car at only half of its max potential as compared to driving my wife’s Prius at it’s max

That's rather the opposite of the old parable that 'its more fun to drive a slow car fast than a fast car slow'... I'd rather drive a slow car fast, but one that at least tries to put some effort into fast car handling. My Honda Fit is actually a lot of fun, my brother's Prius isn't. A Miata is fun...

-Ray
 

Landshark

PhotoDog
Location
SoCal
Real Name
Bob
Slower, less hp cars can be a lot of fun if they handle what they have well, the Fit is one and the Miata and Subaru BRZ/Scion FRS are some of the best at that. The Prius and a slew of others are certainly not in that group.
 

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