article on sensor size, format equivalence

Bruce McL

Regular
Dec 18, 2016
68
Do any of you follow Ming Thien?

He works for Hasselblad, is a commercial photographer, and has a Physics degree from Oxford. He’s been blogging for several years, and recently put up this post about sensor size.

Format equivalence, engineering and practical envelope

I found many things to consider in this post. Here are a couple of them:

- Bigger lenses and sensors are hard for image stabilization systems to move quickly. Smaller sensor cameras have an advantage in IS.

- Micro 4/3 is catching up to APS in size and weight.

I also like his closing advice. Rephrasing in my words:

Sacrificing some of what you value most for better all around performance is an easy mistake to make. Figure out the things you value most in a camera, and buy as much of those features as you can. If your choice is not as good “all around” as some other cameras, don’t worry about it.
 

davidzvi

Top Veteran
Apr 18, 2014
104
Boston Burbs
David
Do any of you follow Ming Thien?

He works for Hasselblad, is a commercial photographer, and has a Physics degree from Oxford. He’s been blogging for several years, and recently put up this post about sensor size.

Format equivalence, engineering and practical envelope

I found many things to consider in this post. Here are a couple of them:

- Bigger lenses and sensors are hard for image stabilization systems to move quickly. Smaller sensor cameras have an advantage in IS.

- Micro 4/3 is catching up to APS in size and weight.

I also like his closing advice. Rephrasing in my words:

Sacrificing some of what you value most for better all around performance is an easy mistake to make. Figure out the things you value most in a camera, and buy as much of those features as you can. If your choice is not as good “all around” as some other cameras, don’t worry about it.
It is an interesting read. While I do agree that m4/3 has been creeping up in size, it does still offer the smaller options in both bodies and glass. Glass is where Nikon and Canon REALLY failed IMHO. Fuji has done a better job of releasing format appropriate glass. But they're still at a disadvantage given the smaller image circle offered buy m4/3.
 
Last edited:
Jan 31, 2011
164
Newcastle, Australia
Sue
The stuff I have to consider now... first is economics, second is ergonomics and last of anything else is consideration of print, because I never do. So a 1" sensor is a fine compromise for me, because I only ever post to flickr, occasionally to instagram, and to forums.

I like what he says at the end...
but remember to keep the creative objective first, or else you’ll never be in that contented place where the hardware becomes a transparent tool and you can just shoot.
 
May 6, 2017
69
Great find. I like the article very much, thank you.
At the moment, due to the season, I am focusing on medium format slides.
And carry a Canon SX220HS or Sony Alpha 5000 should I need a digital camera.
The Bronica with its grip and eye level view finder is too heavy for me to carry my DSLR with it.
:)
 

Bruce McL

Regular
Dec 18, 2016
68
... a 1" sensor is a fine compromise for me, because I only ever post to flickr, occasionally to instagram, and to forums.

I like what he says at the end...
I’m about the same with what I do with my photos. I use small, light micro 4/3 now, but I would be fine with a 1” sensor camera, with one exception. I have a fisheye lens for my GM5 which I really enjoy using. The fisheye, with full and partial de-fishing options, has completely replaced stitched together panorama images, which I did with previous cameras.

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I’m sure you could make fine prints from a 1” camera as long as you stand a few feet away from them. The reason I’m sure is because I have made prints from smaller sensor cameras.

Great find. I like the article very much, thank you.
I like the site in general. I keep it’s RSS feed in my news reader. Recently Ming Thien brought in another contributor named Robin Wong. I like his work with micro 4/3 cameras.

Wong worked for Olympus for a while, and ran a blog of his own for many years. In his old blog, Wong’s review of the Huawei-Leica P9 was the first that made me think about cell phone photography seriously for myself.

Robin Wong: Huawei P9 Camera Review - Is This The Photographer's Smartphone?

It took a year or so after the blog post before I got a phone that was capable enough for me, but now I’m enthusiastic about my phone photography.

Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 

rayvonn

All-Pro
Jan 19, 2015
124
I’m about the same with what I do with my photos. I use small, light micro 4/3 now, but I would be fine with a 1” sensor camera, with one exception. I have a fisheye lens for my GM5 which I really enjoy using. The fisheye, with full and partial de-fishing options, has completely replaced stitched together panorama images, which I did with previous cameras.

View attachment 180326

I’m sure you could make fine prints from a 1” camera as long as you stand a few feet away from them. The reason I’m sure is because I have made prints from smaller sensor cameras.



I like the site in general. I keep it’s RSS feed in my news reader. Recently Ming Thien brought in another contributor named Robin Wong. I like his work with micro 4/3 cameras.

Wong worked for Olympus for a while, and ran a blog of his own for many years. In his old blog, Wong’s review of the Huawei-Leica P9 was the first that made me think about cell phone photography seriously for myself.

Robin Wong: Huawei P9 Camera Review - Is This The Photographer's Smartphone?

It took a year or so after the blog post before I got a phone that was capable enough for me, but now I’m enthusiastic about my phone photography.

View attachment 180325
That Huawei phone is the first one that's made me stand back and go "wow". No idea what the it's like as a phone but the images I've seen from it look mighty impressive.
 

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