Bokeh!

Location
Switzerland
Name
Matt
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More November bloom ...

M.
 

John King

Member of SOFA
Location
Beaumaris, Melbourne, Australia
Name
John ...
View attachment 347898

Using the Sigma 18-50mm on the Z 50 (adapted). Pretty satisfying combo, though today was pushing my ability to hand-hold without stabilisation.

M.
Matt, the old film reciprocal rule of SS = 1/FL needs to be altered to SS = 1/(FL X crop factor).

However, with digital that becomes SS = 1/((FL x 2) x crop factor) to guarantee sharp photos with no IBIS or ILIS.
Probably need to have a factor for age as well ... ;) .
 
Location
Switzerland
Name
Matt
Matt, the old film reciprocal rule of SS = 1/FL needs to be altered to SS = 1/(FL X crop factor).

However, with digital that becomes SS = 1/((FL x 2) x crop factor) to guarantee sharp photos with no IBIS or ILIS.
Probably need to have a factor for age as well ... ;) .
I'm usually pretty good a hand-holding and can go down to 1/30s as a matter of course with all lenses up to 75mm-e, especially on my Ms, but I'll admit it's getting harder. For some obscure reason, I'm struggling with this combo - but I went down to 1/25s at 50mm-e yesterday and the image came out okay, so it's still doable. But yes, it's quite obviously getting harder; age begins to impact things - all over.

M.
 

John King

Member of SOFA
Location
Beaumaris, Melbourne, Australia
Name
John ...
I'm usually pretty good a hand-holding and can go down to 1/30s as a matter of course with all lenses up to 75mm-e, especially on my Ms, but I'll admit it's getting harder. For some obscure reason, I'm struggling with this combo - but I went down to 1/25s at 50mm-e yesterday and the image came out okay, so it's still doable. But yes, it's quite obviously getting harder; age begins to impact things - all over.

M.
I'm finding it more and more difficult to handhold at very slow SSs, even with the legendary sync-IS of my E-M1 MkII +12-100.

Specially if I need to bend my lumbar spine.

Getting old has little to recommend it ... :( .
 
Location
Switzerland
Name
Matt
I'm finding it more and more difficult to handhold at very slow SSs, even with the legendary sync-IS of my E-M1 MkII +12-100.

Specially if I need to bend my lumbar spine.

Getting old has little to recommend it ... :( .
I have to concur, but as trite as it may sound, it is what it is. Nothing to be done about it if you want to keep on living. I'll not let it stop me until it does, which it will. It pays to acknowledge what's coming, and witnessing how things are developing for my parents is immensely instructive. No reason to expect things to be different should I ever get there.

As an aside, I've had another bad night - a penalty for overdoing it yesterday; I can now more or less count on that happening - time to rethink my way of going about my daily business. I hope I can reign myself in in time.

M.
 
Location
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Name
Miguel Tejada-Flores
I have to concur, but as trite as it may sound, it is what it is. Nothing to be done about it if you want to keep on living. I'll not let it stop me until it does, which it will. It pays to acknowledge what's coming, and witnessing how things are developing for my parents is immensely instructive. No reason to expect things to be different should I ever get there.

I rather both agree with you and partially disagree with you as well, Matt. Of course you are right, seeing what develops with one's own parents as they age can give glimpses, or indications, of what awaits us, ourselves, later on, when we ourselves become as (impossibly, so it seems) old as they are.

But I also believe the opposite - because (and I don't know if this is valid as a generality, or merely applicable to my own specific experiences) the ways in which I've lived my life have been different enough from my parents' choices, to suggest that the patterns of my own aging and health won't necessarily follow or mirror those of my immediate progenitors.

Short version of the above: things might well be different (in hopefully good and/or interesting ways) for you and me and all of us, as we ourselves grow older. But the one constant in my own life seems to be that whenever I've thought I've figured out how things are or will be, they change and/or surprise me :)

As an aside, I've had another bad night - a penalty for overdoing it yesterday; I can now more or less count on that happening - time to rethink my way of going about my daily business. I hope I can reign myself in in time.

M.

I can relate. Overdoing it sometimes (often?!) seems truly appropriate, though occasionally (sigh) one must pay a price.
But on the other hand, when all is said and done, I can relate to the quote which is often (though incorrectly) ascribed to the ancient Greek philosopher Epicurus: “Eat, drink and be merry, for tomorrow we may die.;)
 

John King

Member of SOFA
Location
Beaumaris, Melbourne, Australia
Name
John ...
@MoonMind and @MiguelATF

My mother died suddenly from the last of half a dozen unsuspected strokes at 63 y.o. She almost certainly had type 2 diabetes, which wasn't really well understood 50 years ago. Both my extant siblings have type 2 diabetes, I haven't.

My father died at 89 y.o. of a sub-dural haematoma after or perhaps caused by a fall. He also had a bad back, which I suspect is hereditary, but neither of my siblings has this.

The only reason I'm alive today is down to excellent medical care, modern advances in medicine (cardiac ablations being just one) and paying meticulous attention to my medications and what I do. I suspect that I haven't got a long shelf life ...

However, we all have one life, so we are all in the same boat. We are born, we have one life, then we die. My elder sister taught me that before she died of breast cancer at 43 y.o.

I would personally choose to have a long, healthy life, then die suddenly. Unfortunately, we do not get to choose.

So I'm an invalid physically (was granted an invalid pension at 63.5 y.o.). Fortunately, my brain still works pretty well. However my back and upper skeleton are pretty bad, and I will probably be taking Targin for the rest of my life to ameliorate the pain. I spend the best part of an hour a day managing and taking medications.

The only time I have no pain is when I'm in our swimming pool at around 25°C+. That's bliss! Because of Raynaud's disease, the water has to be at or above that 25°. The solar energy people have now fixed the buggered pool blanket electric roller, and the water temperature is now over 21°C. There is an enormous heat pump (about 7 kW, at full power) and an 8 kW solar panel system that powers it. Allows me to swim for 5-6 months a year.

How fortunate to be born in the first world, and fortunate to be able to afford such amazing luxuries as all of the above! Most are not so fortunate, as I am keenly aware.
 
Location
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Name
Miguel Tejada-Flores
@MoonMind and @MiguelATF

My mother died suddenly from the last of half a dozen unsuspected strokes at 63 y.o. She almost certainly had type 2 diabetes, which wasn't really well understood 50 years ago. Both my extant siblings have type 2 diabetes, I haven't.

My father died at 89 y.o. of a sub-dural haematoma after or perhaps caused by a fall. He also had a bad back, which I suspect is hereditary, but neither of my siblings has this.

The only reason I'm alive today is down to excellent medical care, modern advances in medicine (cardiac ablations being just one) and paying meticulous attention to my medications and what I do. I suspect that I haven't got a long shelf life ...

However, we all have one life, so we are all in the same boat. We are born, we have one life, then we die. My elder sister taught me that before she died of breast cancer at 43 y.o.

I would personally choose to have a long, healthy life, then die suddenly. Unfortunately, we do not get to choose.

So I'm an invalid physically (was granted an invalid pension at 63.5 y.o.). Fortunately, my brain still works pretty well. However my back and upper skeleton are pretty bad, and I will probably be taking Targin for the rest of my life to ameliorate the pain. I spend the best part of an hour a day managing and taking medications.

The only time I have no pain is when I'm in our swimming pool at around 25°C+. That's bliss! Because of Raynaud's disease, the water has to be at or above that 25°. The solar energy people have now fixed the buggered pool blanket electric roller, and the water temperature is now over 21°C. There is an enormous heat pump (about 7 kW, at full power) and an 8 kW solar panel system that powers it. Allows me to swim for 5-6 months a year.

How fortunate to be born in the first world, and fortunate to be able to afford such amazing luxuries as all of the above! Most are not so fortunate, as I am keenly aware.

Worthy and moving words, John. Thanks for them. And thanks as well for continuing to treat me and others to your visions, as seen from behind and through your camera's lenses. They offer testimony and more to both your experiences, and the creativity of how you see things.
 
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