Book recommendation

Jock Elliott

Hall of Famer
Jan 3, 2012
Troy, NY
It’s no secret: I have “a thing” about photographing the grandeur of the sky. As a result, I find myself constantly trying to reconcile the disparity between my reaction to a skyscape – Wow, that is amazingly awesome! – and the results I typically get – Wow, that is amazingly flat.

Of late, I have been patrolling the Internet in search of skyscapes that move me, in the hopes that I could learn something from what other photographers have captured. Recently, I ran across a fellow who still shoots film, takes excellent photographs, and who recommended Galen Rowell’s Vision – the Art of Adventure photography.

Through Amazon, I was able to whistle up a copy for a penny (plus $3.99 shipping), and, even though I doubt that I will ever trek in Nepal or hang from pitons on a vertical face, I can highly recommend it. It is divided into four sections: Goals, Preparations, Journeys, and Realizations.

Each section is populated by edited essays from Rowell’s column for Outdoor Photographer magazine followed by photograph pages to which the essays are keyed. While I am only about 15% through the book so far, I can already see it’s worth well enough to suggest anyone here might enjoy a copy. Rowell has not yet told me how to take great sky photographs but he has already made me think a great deal about what I am doing, and he is an engaging writer. Heck, the cover shot alone is worth the price of admission.

Cheers, Jock
 

Lightmancer

Legend
Aug 13, 2011
Sunny Frimley
Bill Palmer
Just giving this a richly deserved bump. I have had this book for over a decade. and it is an inspirational read. I particularly like Galen's "zone system" for mankind's influence on the natural world. From memory, I think the centre of Tokyo and the South Pole are the extremes, but Everest base camp scores badly for human damage.

Sadly Galen and his wife died some years ago in a light plane crash - they are sorely missed.
 

Jock Elliott

Hall of Famer
Jan 3, 2012
Troy, NY
Just giving this a richly deserved bump. I have had this book for over a decade. and it is an inspirational read. I particularly like Galen's "zone system" for mankind's influence on the natural world. From memory, I think the centre of Tokyo and the South Pole are the extremes, but Everest base camp scores badly for human damage.

Sadly Galen and his wife died some years ago in a light plane crash - they are sorely missed.
Bill,

I often wonder what Rowell's reaction would have been to the "digital revolution" in photography.

Cheers, Jock
 

Lightmancer

Legend
Aug 13, 2011
Sunny Frimley
Bill Palmer
I think he would have embraced it. He was innovative, and not afraid to push boundaries in photography or in life. Above all, once the battery problem was solved, I think he would have welcomed having high quality in smaller packages.
 

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