Fuji Continuous Focus Mode - Help!

lwilliamsphoto

New Member
Feb 22, 2014
Hi guys.

I'm a Fuji X-Pro1 and X-T1 user, having recently converted from Nikon back at the beginning of February.

Loving the cameras and lenses and getting some really good results.

One thing I am really really struggling with is the continuous focus mode.

I'm a wedding photographer and I've missed so many important shots because I'm struggling to use the continuous focus mode.

My question is....can anyone give me some tips? Does anyone use this AF mode successfully? How do you achieve your results? What AF / focus settings do you have your menus set to when using continuous mode?

Any tips or knowledge would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks,

Lloyd
 

flysurfer

Hall of Famer
Aug 31, 2011
AF-C works great with the X-E2 and X-T1

https://www.flickr.com/photos/25805910@N05/sets/72157640158298025/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/25805910@N05/sets/72157636522148096/

DSCF1974 – Lightroom 5.4 by ricopress, on Flickr

It doesn't do much in the X-Pro1, of course, quite different paradigm.

OTOH, using the good old "shutter mash" autofocus trick still works with the X-Pro1, X-E1, X-M1 and X-A1. There are several focussing strategies that work with CDAF and CDAF/PDAF hybrid cameras like Fuji X. My X-E1/X-Pro1 book covers some of them, and I am actually expanding on it in my upcoming X-E2 ebook.
 

ean10775

All-Pro
Feb 13, 2013
Cleveland, Ohio
Eric
I don't have an X-T1 however as I understand it (and Rico, please correct me if I'm wrong) to use the AF focus 'tracking' to keep focus on a moving subject you have to be in AF-C mode AND be using one of the burst shooting modes (3fps or 8fps). The X-T1 doesn't allow you to simply track focus and fire off a single frame the way you can with a DSLR in AI Servo and single shot (i.e. with Canon). If you set your focus mode to AF-C and stay in single shot with the X-T1, the camera will only use the very center of the frame and attempt to continuously focus the lens based on what is in the crosshair.
 

ean10775

All-Pro
Feb 13, 2013
Cleveland, Ohio
Eric
To the OP, below is a quote from Rico's first look at the X-T1 which I'll also provide a link to:

"In order to achieve good AF tracking results, I set the camera’s AF-C to “focus priority” (as opposed to “release priority”). Fuji’s PDAF loves vertical lines (or horizontal ones in portrait format), so it’s a bonus to offer the camera just that. Obviously, it’s essential to focus with one of the central nine AF frames. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a sensor that offered PDAF over the entire viewing area? Oh well, one can dream.

Back to reality: Even at 8 fps, the X-T1 still adapts the exposure between shots, but it won’t change white balance or dynamic range settings. If you want to keep the exposure constant throughout a high-speed series, I recommend shooting in manual mode."

http://www.fujirumors.com/first-look-fujifilm-x-t1/
 

flysurfer

Hall of Famer
Aug 31, 2011
X100S has no AF tracking. Sadly. Neither has the X20. I don't really expect a firmware upgrade, but who knows...

X-T1 and X-E2 and XQ1 work pretty much the same. You might want to have a look the owner's manual (available online) of one of these cameras if you are interested in how AF-S/AF-C looks like on the screen. Basically, it looks and works like AF-S, but with tracking for moving objects. So it's rather simple now: stationary object: AF-S; moving object: AF-C. Definitely an improvement over the old CDAF implementation.
 

KillRamsey

Hall of Famer
Jun 20, 2012
Hood River, OR
Kyle
I don't have an X-T1 however as I understand it (and Rico, please correct me if I'm wrong) to use the AF focus 'tracking' to keep focus on a moving subject you have to be in AF-C mode AND be using one of the burst shooting modes (3fps or 8fps). The X-T1 doesn't allow you to simply track focus and fire off a single frame the way you can with a DSLR in AI Servo and single shot (i.e. with Canon). If you set your focus mode to AF-C and stay in single shot with the X-T1, the camera will only use the very center of the frame and attempt to continuously focus the lens based on what is in the crosshair.
I do have it and this has been my experience. On AF-S, you cannot lock onto a target / have target move towards or away from you / keep focus locked / fire single shot. You have to have it in either Continuous Low or Continuous High for the focus to actually keep tracking a moving subject. When you do, it works pretty well.
 

flysurfer

Hall of Famer
Aug 31, 2011
You have to have it in either Continuous Low or Continuous High for the focus to actually keep tracking a moving subject.
My hybrid AF (XQ1, X-E2, X-T1) cameras don't work that way. They track in AF-C no matter what DRIVE mode is selected.
But obviously, continuous mode is a reasonable selection to complement AF-C with. But it's not mandatory.
C-High tracking is only available with the X-T1.
 

ean10775

All-Pro
Feb 13, 2013
Cleveland, Ohio
Eric
My hybrid AF (XQ1, X-E2, X-T1) cameras don't work that way. They track in AF-C no matter what DRIVE mode is selected.
But obviously, continuous mode is a reasonable selection to complement AF-C with. But it's not mandatory.
C-High tracking is only available with the X-T1.
Is there a difference then between the performance of 'predictive focus' and AF-C with regard to tracking a moving subject as you have illustrated in your X-T1, first look and the example images of the little girl running and the horse trotting toward the camera? I guess what I'm not clear on is whether AF-C performance is leaps and bounds over any other mirrorless camera up until this point? or is the impressive aspect the 'predictive focus' which requires the 3fps/8fps continuous shooting to be enabled? What I THINK I understand is that 'predictive focus' is what everyone is raving about and that AF-C without the 'predictive focus' isn't much different than many other mirrorless offerings including earlier Fuji X series cameras. Do I have this all wrong?
 

flysurfer

Hall of Famer
Aug 31, 2011
I don't use non-Fuji MILCs, so I can't really comment on their performance. All I care about is that I get the job done with my X cameras, and luckily, that works pretty well so far.

There are several MILCs with predictive PDAF, some of them may be pretty good (like the Nikon 1 with its smaller sensor), so I'd never say "Fuji has the best AF". IMHO, this is just ridiculous marketing hype, just like the "better than full-frame" mantra. I don't subscribe to that.

I'd expect future Fuji cameras to use the new 24 MP Sony sensor with PDAF covering the entire sensor area. Along with AF point tracking ("3D AF", as Nikon would call it) that might further enhance things. There's still plenty of room for improvement.
 

andrewccm

New Member
Apr 21, 2014
I am a x-t1 (and other Fuji bodies) owner as well as many other systems. IMHO while the xT1 does track and AF pretty well in many conditions, It's far from a decent slr when tracking low contrast and/or low light objects. Acquisition time is much more laggy and in those scenarios (much like weddings in lower lit environments) the xT1 will hunt. I know there are many that have switched with the XT1 from their DSLRs for wedding work. However, for me personally...I couldn't imagine it being my primary camera for such events. I use it often, but not when tracking erratic motion. This is just my personal experience. Obviously, YMMV.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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