Coronavirus 2020 🤧

christilou

Legend
Jul 13, 2010
Sunny Frimley
Um.

According to the news here no more than ten minutes ago he's not on a ventilator. He has been given oxygen, which is not the same. A ventilator involves a machine breathing for the patient, oxygen means that they are breathing for themselves.

There are incidentally some interesting details coming out about the importance of position and posture on treatment effectiveness. Lying patients on their front, rather than back - or worse, propped up, gives the lungs more room in the body to inflate.

Yes. Boris is reported to be intensive care so that he can be near a ventilator if needed. Did you see the video of the NHS doctor demonstrating how to breathe to help with any lung infection ?
 
Jan 31, 2011
Newcastle, Australia
Sue
worse, propped up, gives the lungs more room in the body to inflate.
Interesting. The only way I can breathe when I have pneumonia, is through being upright, I cannot lie down in any position. Except when doing postural drainage, and then, I’m hanging face down over the edge of the bed, head and lungs down. The rest of the time I need CPAP and cant lie on my front with that.
 
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Jonathan F/2

Veteran
Aug 21, 2011
Los Angeles, USA
I just went grocery shopping today. It's now an all-day affair just to get food! I've switched to shopping every two weeks now, instead of once a week. Before going I have to prep all my PPE gear including two masks (one washable, one antiviral), safety glasses, gloves (disposable), and shoe coverings (disposable) so I don't track anything into my car. I also wear my quick-dry gym clothes since the material is easy to wash. Depending on the store, I have to wait in line. Today was raining so I also had to wear a rain jacket.

My wife and kids gave me a huge mega list of groceries so I aimed first for the hard to get items and worked my way down to the more common items. Almost all the customers were wearing masks and everyone was doing their best to social distance.

The shopping is actually the easy part, because once I get home I have cleaning supplies ready to individually wipe down and disinfect everything. I've been resorting to just using bleach diluted in water, that way I can conserve on my other cleaning sprays and disinfectant wipes. All shopping bags are immediately recycled and never brought in the house. For some packaged items I'll switch them over to plastic containers and dispose of the boxes. Fruits are individually washed with water and soap. Garlic, onions and potatoes get left outside to air out for at least 24 hours. We have a system where I do all the wiping down and my daughter puts everything away. Any left over bleach water is used to wipe down the kitchen and bathrooms so it doesn't go to waste. After that's done, I place my shopping clothes in a bag and leave it outside for when I do my next laundry load. I then go straight to the shower and thoroughly wash.

Anyways, that's my shopping system! ;)
 
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rayvonn

Hall of Famer
Jan 19, 2015
I just went grocery shopping today. It's now an all-day affair just to get food! I've switched to shopping every two weeks now, instead of once a week. Before going I have to prep all my PPE gear including two masks (one washable, one antiviral), safety glasses, gloves (disposable), and shoe coverings (disposable) so I don't track anything into my car. I also wear my quick-dry gym clothes since the material is easy to wash. Depending on the store, I have to wait in line. Today was raining so I also had to wear a rain jacket.

My wife and kids gave me a huge mega list of groceries so I aimed first for the hard to get items and worked my way down to the more common items. Almost all the customers were wearing masks and everyone was doing their best to social distance.

The shopping is actually the easy part, because once I get home I have cleaning supplies ready to individually wipe down and disinfect everything. I've been resorting to just using bleach diluted in water, that way I can conserve on my other cleaning sprays and disinfectant wipes. All shopping bags are immediately recycled and never brought in the house. For some packaged items I'll switch them over to plastic containers and dispose of the boxes. Fruits are individually washed with water and soap. Garlic, onions and potatoes get left outside to air out for at least 24 hours. We have a system where I do all the wiping down and my daughter puts everything away. Any left over bleach water is used to wipe down the kitchen and bathrooms so it doesn't go to waste. After that's done, I place my shopping clothes in a bag and leave it outside for when I do my next laundry load. I then go straight to the shower and thoroughly wash.

Anyways, that's my shopping system! ;)
I feel Jonathan would look at my daily routine and consider me a very lazy so and so.
 

Jonathan F/2

Veteran
Aug 21, 2011
Los Angeles, USA
I feel Jonathan would look at my daily routine and consider me a very lazy so and so.
I figure viral transmission through the actual food products is probably a low probability. I do think going to the store and being exposed to viral moisture particles does increase your risk and it's been proven through the amount of grocery workers who've been exposed. I figure at the very least as long as everyone is masked at the store (which in Los Angeles is now made mandatory), it will help minimize the spread. In fact I think if everyone wore at least wore washable cloth masks, even just a bandana around their face, it would make a huge difference at halting this stupid virus!
 
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BrianS

Legend
Jul 7, 2010
I really don't think WHO knows what it is doing, and would certainly trust what my wife says over them. It's a reduction in probability spreading the disease.
Her degree is in Physiology and Medical Engineering.
 
Nov 11, 2011
Milwaukee, WI USA
Luke
Bill, while I agree with you that is fairly ineffective against keeping one from GETTING the virus....especially the way many people use them, the surgeon general (and many health care providers) are recommending them to people to use them to reduce the TRANSMISSION.

The problematic thing is that such a high percentage of people NEVER SHOW symptoms but have the virus and are actively transmitting it....especially as evidence continues to mount that people can transfer it not just be sneezing and coughing on people, but by merely being in close proximity and talking.

One doesn't wear the mask to protect oneself....one wears it to protect everyone they meet or cross paths with.

And after reading the article you shared, if you read between the lines, they also say that it is to mitigate exposing other people....not for protection of the self.
 
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Kevin

Code Monkey 🐒
Nov 3, 2018
Posted earlier....

Writing last month, Adrien Burch, an expert in microbiology at the University of California, Berkeley, noted that "despite hearing that face masks 'don't work,' you probably haven't seen any strong evidence to support that claim. That's because it doesn't exist."

In fact, there is evidence of the exact opposite: that masks help prevent viral infections like the current pandemic.

Burch pointed to a Cochrane Review -- a systemic analysis of published studies on a given topic -- which found strong evidence during the 2003 SARS epidemic in support of wearing masks. One study of community transmission in Beijing found that "consistently wearing a mask in public was associated with a 70% reduction in the risk of catching SARS."

SARS, like Covid-19, is a respiratory illnesses caused by the same family of viruses called coronavirus.
 

Lightmancer

Legend
Aug 13, 2011
Sunny Frimley
Bill Palmer
Gentlemen, I have one huge issue with the wearing of masks. They appear to have taken on a totemic importance which is simply not backed up by the science. I am a man of fact not faith and I simply cannot subscribe to this unfounded opinion.

The problem is that in laboratory conditions a properly fitted mask, worn for the recommended time and no longer, and removed and disposed of in accordance with hygiene protocols DOES provide protection.

Ill fitting masks worn by inexperienced users for periods of time longer than specified and removed and disposed of in ignorance of hygiene protocols are neither use nor ornament. Masks are uncomfortable. They are irritating. They encourage more face touching, often unconscious and inadvertent, and the moisture that accumulates within both reduces their effectiveness and causes hygiene issues in itself.

Above all if you wear a mask without eye protection you are simply bolting the doors and leaving the windows wide open.

Masks engender a false sense of security and lead to a relaxation of the real, proven measures that we must all continue to adhere to in order to minimise the risk to others and to ourselves.

Keep your distance.

Wash your hands.

Thank you.
 

BrianS

Legend
Jul 7, 2010
I am going to continue wearing the mask when going out.

That is the directive for anyone going to my place of work, and the directive from my wife.

I've noted the pitfalls of wearing them- and am mindful of that. I'm also wearing gloves, am used to wearing them in the Lab. I wear eye glasses, about as big as safety glasses- and that is as far as I am going with this.

Anything can be abused, and anything can be made ineffective through poor practice.

That is not a good reason to not even try a safety precaution.
 

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