Day 28 - Silver September 2013

Yeats

All-Pro
Location
New Jersey, USA
Real Name
Chris
Taken this afternoon...

I have no idea
 

MiguelATF

Hall of Famer
Location
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Real Name
Miguel Tejada-Flores
That sounds more than a bit interesting Miguel - tell us more

I have a friend who writes screenplays, many haven't made it but one did as a co-writer - Twin Town. A sequel was on the cards but seems to have slid out of sight which is a pity as the basis was hilarious in a black (very black) comedy way.

Writing - and specifically writing screenplays - is my day job. That's actually not quite right: it's what I do all the time - and it's also my 'day job' when I get paid for it, which is not all the time. This particular project is one I wrote for and with (a collaboration) the film's director, Fernando Lebrija, who divides his time between Guadalajara and L.A. We completed most of the film's principal photography last year but needed to do a few 'reshoots' so returned to Mexico this week. The story is a comedy about two high school seniors who disobey their parents and sneak off to Puerto Vallarta - and the insanity that ensues. Actually, it's also a human (coming-of-age) drama and an adventure story as well. The current working title - 'I Brake for Gringos' -is a bumpersticker on the back of the crazed Mexican taxista (taxi driver) who befriends the heroes; in the film he is played by Silverio Palacios, a brilliant Mexican actor who's basically unknown in the United States.

The photo in question here, of Sansans, was taken midway through a long 'night shoot' (from sundown to sunup) on location just outside of Mexico City. Filming is a pretty exhausting business, and filming at night is even more exhausting; it's also logistically complicated to the point where it resembles waging a small ground war. There are moments (like the 'lunch break' at around 1 in the morning) when most of the crew can relax for a few minutes over a meal; but the cinematographer and director, both master visual storytellers, are continually focusing their individual and collective creative energies into the forthcoming shots and 'set-ups' that still must be filmed. And like novels, scenes and images from good films have text and subtext and shades of meaning and content in addition to and above and beyond a simple description of characters and action (who does what in the scene or shot) - and those can't happen without the filmmakers putting in a lot of energy, thought and focus.

One of the things I wonder about is if a photo can somehow document some of that inner flow which goes on inside people's minds. I think it's possible (obviously great photographs can do it) but difficult. What I do know is - Sansans is a gifted imagemaker whose film frames are painted with light and shadow and sharpness and blurs - and he puts a lot of himself into what he does.
 

ReD

Hall of Famer
One of the things I wonder about is if a photo can somehow document some of that inner flow which goes on inside people's minds. I think it's possible (obviously great photographs can do it) but difficult. What I do know is - Sansans is a gifted imagemaker whose film frames are painted with light and shadow and sharpness and blurs - and he puts a lot of himself into what he does.

The one person that seems able to do this here consistently is Karen - Briar

check out her Flickr site

http://www.flickr.com/photos/52846163@N07
 

TheRubySusan

Top Veteran
Location
Henry, IL
Real Name
Ruby
Sorry to break theme :D Anyway here's 6 small submissions.. I just love this time of year and obviously.. pumpkins!

View attachment 77366



..and this should have me caught up again. Even if my time is scant, I refuse to let go of my hobby.

Love them all, but especially the horizontal pumpkins/straw bales! The lighting/processing on it really made me sit up and take notice!
 

TheRubySusan

Top Veteran
Location
Henry, IL
Real Name
Ruby
foto%2028004%2028-09-2013-L.jpg

wheelbarrow

I saw it right off! Different setting, but it reminds me of William Carlos Williams' "The Red Wheelbarrow" which, interestingly, the Wikipedia article on the poem says was influenced by the photography of Alfred Steiglitz - full circle! "so much depends
upon a red wheel
barrow glazed with rain
water beside the white
chickens" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Red_Wheelbarrow
 

TheRubySusan

Top Veteran
Location
Henry, IL
Real Name
Ruby
Writing - and specifically writing screenplays - is my day job. That's actually not quite right: it's what I do all the time - and it's also my 'day job' when I get paid for it, which is not all the time. This particular project is one I wrote for and with (a collaboration) the film's director, Fernando Lebrija, who divides his time between Guadalajara and L.A. We completed most of the film's principal photography last year but needed to do a few 'reshoots' so returned to Mexico this week. The story is a comedy about two high school seniors who disobey their parents and sneak off to Puerto Vallarta - and the insanity that ensues. Actually, it's also a human (coming-of-age) drama and an adventure story as well. The current working title - 'I Brake for Gringos' -is a bumpersticker on the back of the crazed Mexican taxista (taxi driver) who befriends the heroes; in the film he is played by Silverio Palacios, a brilliant Mexican actor who's basically unknown in the United States.

The photo in question here, of Sansans, was taken midway through a long 'night shoot' (from sundown to sunup) on location just outside of Mexico City. Filming is a pretty exhausting business, and filming at night is even more exhausting; it's also logistically complicated to the point where it resembles waging a small ground war. There are moments (like the 'lunch break' at around 1 in the morning) when most of the crew can relax for a few minutes over a meal; but the cinematographer and director, both master visual storytellers, are continually focusing their individual and collective creative energies into the forthcoming shots and 'set-ups' that still must be filmed. And like novels, scenes and images from good films have text and subtext and shades of meaning and content in addition to and above and beyond a simple description of characters and action (who does what in the scene or shot) - and those can't happen without the filmmakers putting in a lot of energy, thought and focus.

One of the things I wonder about is if a photo can somehow document some of that inner flow which goes on inside people's minds. I think it's possible (obviously great photographs can do it) but difficult. What I do know is - Sansans is a gifted imagemaker whose film frames are painted with light and shadow and sharpness and blurs - and he puts a lot of himself into what he does.

How cool, Miguel! Thank you for sharing!
 

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