Challenge! Day to Day 151

wee-pics

All-Pro
Location
Germany
Real Name
Walter
PA254479.3.jpg

Still fascinated by the richness of all these autumn colours, that special beauty of decay.
Yes, the pic is about all that's around the mushroom, philosophically the mushroom can be considered
"a centered self without being self-centered".
 
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Location
Switzerland
Real Name
Matt
Thanks, Matt, for sharing this song. Never heard his name. But what a voice ... and a cool guitar!
This song touched my heart.

He's a bit like an urban Jack Johnson, though not as consistent. He's also a truely nice guy who initiates and supports social projects. He was quite a find, though I have yet to listen to an album I'd actually want to own in its entirety. Luckily, he's very generous with sharing his songs online.

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Still fascinated by the richness of all these autumn colours, that special beauty of decay.
Yes, the pic is about all that's around the mushroom, philosophically the mushroom can be considered
"a centered self without being self-centered".

You hit the nail on the head with that description - and the image is a beautiful illustration of your point; this is a time when philosophy and introspection are needed - and tremendously helpful.

M.
 
Location
Switzerland
Real Name
Matt
Ah, percussionists! The mad dogs of the musical world. During some of these classical or choral pieces, I always imagine the drummer suddenly just breaking out into a rock concert solo.
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Something I'd really like to write (though I'm woefully bad at scripting percussion): Concerto for four drumsets and a sleepy triangle, in 5/8 (a "Stolpermarsch" ~ stumble march) ;)

M.
 

drd1135

Zen Snapshooter
Location
Lexington, VA
Real Name
Steve
Something I'd really like to write (though I'm woefully bad at scripting percussion): Concerto for four drumsets and a sleepy triangle, in 5/8 (a "Stolpermarsch" ~ stumble march) ;)

M.
During my time in India, I was surprised to discover how rhythmic some of their native music is, as opposed to western music.
 
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wee-pics

All-Pro
Location
Germany
Real Name
Walter
I'd really, really love to see people try and march to this:



View attachment 238928

:biggrin:

M.
So do I. A friend of mine of Greek origin plays 7/8, 9/8 and 13/8 tunes. It sounds great, though slightly odd, they even dance to it. I still don't really get behind it. When I asked him about 7/8 rhythm playing he said that it's very easy, you just count 1-2-3-4, 1-2-3 .
 
Location
Switzerland
Real Name
Matt
I like it. You could boogie to it, maybe not march. I missed the MP3 at first, so I tried to find it on Google and I found some group named Diazepam:
3/4-4/4-3/4-4/4 ... - that's trivial 😜 (No, of course it isn't ... at least not for your feet.)

I think the name of the group is a bit of a give-away, though (you may know "Valium" better ...).

M.
 

MiguelATF

Hall of Famer
Location
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Real Name
Miguel Tejada-Flores
So do I. A friend of mine of Greek origin plays 7/8, 9/8 and 13/8 tunes. It sounds great, though slightly odd, they even dance to it. I still don't really get behind it. When I asked him about 7/8 rhythm playing he said that it's very easy, you just count 1-2-3-4, 1-2-3 .
Many - actually most - of the complex 'uneven' rhythms which proliferate all over the Balkans - but are found especially in parts of Macedonia and Bulgaria - come from the centuries of Ottoman rule, when many of the Turkish rhythms were both adopted but then further improvised upon by the locals. Many of whom are or were from the Rom or gypsy culture. I've actually been playing (and occasionally performing) as a percussionist with a number of assorted Balkan groups over the last three or four decades, and longer than that still - and the truth is, when you hear - and sometimes play - and sometimes dance to - these rhythms which seem exotic and complex to those who come out of the more even-metered occidental traditions ... it really is much more 'easy'.

7/8 is one of the classic rhythms which is played both slowly and at warp speeds (often by the newer generation of so-called Bulgarian 'Wedding Music' gypsy musicians, like Ivo Papasov and his ensembles); it is often counted 1-2-3, 1-2, 1-2 - in which the 1-2-3 simplifies to a 'long(er)' beat, and the 1-2's are 'short' beats - so in its simpler forms, the rhythm is counted as: long, short, short... long, short, short... etc. But most people who have grown up with these rhythms - including the more complex 11/8 and 13/8 (and other even more seemingly mind-numbing variations) - don't actually 'count them out' - you just sort of tap your foot and 'feel it'.

A further complication is that, all over the Balkans - and Turkey and the Middle East - as well as across North Africa - where there is a commonality of so-called odd-metered music and rhythms - most musicians tend to 'syncopate' their playing like mad, all the time - which makes it harder for many Western-trained musicians... to master.

But your friend of Greek Origin is 1000% right - they do dance to it. And when they do - often in large circles - it's really astoundingly cool :)
 

MiguelATF

Hall of Famer
Location
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Real Name
Miguel Tejada-Flores
3/4-4/4-3/4-4/4 ... - that's trivial 😜 (No, of course it isn't ... at least not for your feet.)

I think the name of the group is a bit of a give-away, though (you may know "Valium" better ...).

M.

As long as we're on the (endlessly fascinating, to some of us, at least) general subject of complex non-even-metered rhythms - and specifically some of the odd-meters which are played across Serbia, Macedonia, Bulgaria, Albania and Turkey (just to name a few) - let's not forget the classic 5/8 - which was appropriated in such a cool way by Dave Brubeck & Co, many moons ago -- 'Take Five'

 

MiguelATF

Hall of Famer
Location
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Real Name
Miguel Tejada-Flores
I've got to admit it: I love Halloween.

If for no other reason than the crazy shop-window decorations which seem to proliferate around this time of year.

Especially in the neighboring small city of Ashland, Oregon - home to the Oregon Shakespeare Festival - and to a significant percentage of eccentric theatrically-inclined citizens and businesses.

This was taken looking into the shop-window of 'Renaissance Rose', a small store which, for decades, has always stocked a wonderful selection of Halloween costumes and masks. (Though, with the pandemic and social distancing this year, no one really knows....what lies in store on All Hallows Eve.)

EP3_Skeleton_Shopwindow(AnalEfex).jpg


Taken with my recently acquired Olympus 17mm pancake lens, on my vintage E-P1.
 
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