Challenge! Day to Day 156

Location
Switzerland
Real Name
Matt
Start Date
Nov 3, 2020
End Date
Nov 3, 2020
In order not get drawn into actual politics, I took refuge in history (not always a cosy place ...); like so many other things, some important facts have trivial origins (which are nonetheless decisive):


M.
 

wee-pics

Hall of Famer
Location
Germany
Real Name
Walter
PB024576.1.JPG

E-M5 with 2.8/12-40 pro
 
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Location
Switzerland
Real Name
Matt
This is a little treat, honouring today's procedures in the spirit of democracy - bridging the ocean with a solid 100 years of instrument making genius:

DSC_1607.jpg


In the front we have our American entry, the curved King soprano from 1919/1920; a wonderful player with frugal, but very efficient keywork. My favourite soprano!

In the back, an even more special instrument: This alto was made by Adolphe Eduoard Sax, the son of the saxophone's inventor, Adolphe, in Paris. It's a 1920 Briard Lyrist (the Sax name had already been sold at this time). It's not in the best of states, having suffered a heavy neck pulldown at some point in the past and obviously been used as sort of a beater by someone who had no idea what he (probably not she) was holding, but it plays amazingly well for such an old and battered instrument; if only I could get the neck serviced ... but that's really hard to do. That said, I probably shouldn't take it out for gigging ... but we shall see (I'll certainly try at least once).

N.B. I use "modern" mouthpieces (nothing older than 50 years) on these instruments to be able to control their various moods ...

M.
 

drd1135

Zen Snapshooter
Location
SW Virginia
Real Name
Steve
This is a little treat, honouring today's procedures in the spirit of democracy - bridging the ocean with a solid 100 years of instrument making genius:

View attachment 239379

In the front we have our American entry, the curved King soprano from 1919/1920; a wonderful player with frugal, but very efficient keywork. My favourite soprano!

In the back, an even more special instrument: This alto was made by Adolphe Eduoard Sax, the son of the saxophone's inventor, Adolphe, in Paris. It's a 1920 Briard Lyrist (the Sax name had already been sold at this time). It's not in the best of states, having suffered a heavy neck pulldown at some point in the past and obviously been used as sort of a beater by someone who had no idea what he (probably not she) was holding, but it plays amazingly well for such an old and battered instrument; if only I could get the neck serviced ... but that's really hard to do. That said, I probably shouldn't take it out for gigging ... but we shall see (I'll certainly try at least once).

N.B. I use "modern" mouthpieces (nothing older than 50 years) on these instruments to be able to control their various moods ...

M.
I really like the picture, but I'm very pleased to know you play the sax. I've never been able to really master an instrument, so I appease myself with being an appreciative ear.
 

wee-pics

Hall of Famer
Location
Germany
Real Name
Walter
I really like the picture, but I'm very pleased to know you play the sax. I've never been able to really master an instrument, so I appease myself with being an appreciative ear.
We musicians would be nothing without all those who lend us an appreciative ear.
And we recognize them in the audience while we play ... they have a special sparkle in their eyes, a kind of dreamy look and a bright smile on their lips. Not to forget their feet tapping along in rhythm.
It's for them that we try to do our very best.
 
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tonyturley

Legend
Location
Scott Depot, WV, USA
Real Name
Tony
As if I needed to cement the fact that I am perfectly capable of making really dumb mistakes, I got up this morning, went down to the shop, carefully marked off the centerline and taper lines of the slotted fretboard - and then noticed after I had already rough cut the sides that I had tapered the board from the wrong end. :mad: It would have been less aggravating if I had taken a US $20 bill out to the sidewalk and lit it on fire. Cutting fret slots squarely and accurately is not a trivial task. Back to square one.

DSCF0413.JPG
 

wee-pics

Hall of Famer
Location
Germany
Real Name
Walter
As if I needed to cement the fact that I am perfectly capable of making really dumb mistakes, I got up this morning, went down to the shop, carefully marked off the centerline and taper lines of the slotted fretboard - and then noticed after I had already rough cut the sides that I had tapered the board from the wrong end. :mad: It would have been less aggravating if I had taken a US $20 bill out to the sidewalk and lit it on fire. Cutting fret slots squarely and accurately is not a trivial task. Back to square one.

View attachment 239386
Alas, there is no emoji for this kind of experience. And I'll make no dumb remarks either.
I once put together a two-door wardrobe only to discover when I wanted to fix the metal bars for the hangers that the supports were just 20 cm from the bottom (instead of the top). As I had already fixed the back side with its 40something screws I had to take it apart again. And that in times when screwdrivers were driven by hands instead of accus. I still remember the blisters I had.
 
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