Challenge! Day to Day 72

tonyturley

Legend
Nov 24, 2014
Scott Depot, WV, USA
Tony
Another of the many hobbies in which I’ve participated through the years was rocketry. “Model” rocketry, which is the type found in hobby stores, uses motors designated “1/2A” through “G”. A “G” motor is a truly impressive work of engineering, capable of launching a rocket over 6 feet tall. I still have a few “G” motors in storage. “High power” rocketry begins at “H” and goes all the way through “P” if I remember correctly. The largest I ever used was “H”, and I had built a 6 foot upscale of a popular 1970s model rocket to use that motor. The rocket was a real crowd pleaser at our club’s monthly launches, but was unfortunately destroyed due to a parachute failure. The 3 unbuilt kits on the workbench use motors from “B” to “D”, and the red Navy model used “E” or “F” motors. It is still functional and requires a very large open field, because an “E” will send it to around 1,600 feet; an “F” would boost it to over 3,000 feet.

Here’s a link to an article I wrote 21 years ago. You can just skim the article, as it goes into detail on how I modified a popular model rocket of that time to handle much more powerful motors. But there are two images published with the article, and one of them shows the rocket launching on a “G” motor. If I’m not mistaken, I took both of those images with my old Praktica film camera: Modification - Big Wild Daddy {Modification} I still have that model on display, and it is still functional.

DSCF0150.JPG
 

drd1135

Zen Snapshooter
Jul 13, 2011
Lexington, VA
Steve
Another of the many hobbies in which I’ve participated through the years was rocketry. “Model” rocketry, which is the type found in hobby stores, uses motors designated “1/2A” through “G”. A “G” motor is a truly impressive work of engineering, capable of launching a rocket over 6 feet tall. I still have a few “G” motors in storage. “High power” rocketry begins at “H” and goes all the way through “P” if I remember correctly. The largest I ever used was “H”, and I had built a 6 foot upscale of a popular 1970s model rocket to use that motor. The rocket was a real crowd pleaser at our club’s monthly launches, but was unfortunately destroyed due to a parachute failure. The 3 unbuilt kits on the workbench use motors from “B” to “D”, and the red Navy model used “E” or “F” motors. It is still functional and requires a very large open field, because an “E” will send it to around 1,600 feet; an “F” would boost it to over 3,000 feet.

Here’s a link to an article I wrote 21 years ago. You can just skim the article, as it goes into detail on how I modified a popular model rocket of that time to handle much more powerful motors. But there are two images published with the article, and one of them shows the rocket launching on a “G” motor. If I’m not mistaken, I took both of those images with my old Praktica film camera: Modification - Big Wild Daddy {Modification} I still have that model on display, and it is still functional.

View attachment 231887
My childhood neural storage area starts screaming. I crashed a lot of these in the north end of Fall River, Massachusetts.
 

donlaw

Hall of Famer
Sep 14, 2012
Texas
Don
Another of the many hobbies in which I’ve participated through the years was rocketry. “Model” rocketry, which is the type found in hobby stores, uses motors designated “1/2A” through “G”. A “G” motor is a truly impressive work of engineering, capable of launching a rocket over 6 feet tall. I still have a few “G” motors in storage. “High power” rocketry begins at “H” and goes all the way through “P” if I remember correctly. The largest I ever used was “H”, and I had built a 6 foot upscale of a popular 1970s model rocket to use that motor. The rocket was a real crowd pleaser at our club’s monthly launches, but was unfortunately destroyed due to a parachute failure. The 3 unbuilt kits on the workbench use motors from “B” to “D”, and the red Navy model used “E” or “F” motors. It is still functional and requires a very large open field, because an “E” will send it to around 1,600 feet; an “F” would boost it to over 3,000 feet.

Here’s a link to an article I wrote 21 years ago. You can just skim the article, as it goes into detail on how I modified a popular model rocket of that time to handle much more powerful motors. But there are two images published with the article, and one of them shows the rocket launching on a “G” motor. If I’m not mistaken, I took both of those images with my old Praktica film camera: Modification - Big Wild Daddy {Modification} I still have that model on display, and it is still functional.

View attachment 231887
I used to build those model rockets as a kid. I did one that had a clear nosecone. Launched a unlucky 'cricket' that I caught up on that one once. The insect survived but must have experienced some serious freak out!
I once launched the smallest rocket I had built with the largest engine it could fit inside. It went spectacularly high and fast. Quick went out of sight never to be seen again! Always dreamed it made it to orbit!
 
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