Film Delving Into Fomapan 200

agentlossing

All-Pro
Location
S. Oregon Coast (the Northernmost-Cal of them All)
Real Name
Andrew Lossing
I just developed only the second roll of Fomapan 200 that I've shot, and I find it a very different film. Unique, and kind of hard to wrap my head around. It's well spoken of, and often out of stock, pointing to either higher demand, or more difficulty in manufacturing than Foma 100 and 400. I decided to snap up a 100' roll on Adorama, which hasn't arrived yet, but developing this roll has reminded me that it's not going to be the relative cakewalk that shooting Foma 100 is. Foma 200 is less easy to anticipate. Also not that easy to scan, at least using Silverfast. So I decided to create this thread to go into my observations using it, above and beyond what I'd want to post in the showcase thread for this film. Oh, and observations and recommendations are appreciated. I'd like to get the best out of this film, since I sort of committed myself to shooting around 18-20 rolls of the stuff...

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agentlossing

All-Pro
Location
S. Oregon Coast (the Northernmost-Cal of them All)
Real Name
Andrew Lossing
I'm thinking slight underexposure might suit this film well. The normal exposures above tended to produce pretty flat negatives, and one thing I noticed in scanning them was that the film really doesn't like any negative exposure adjustment being added during scanning. Shadows, which tend to look dark gray, get chunky with erratic blocks of black when trying to lower the exposure. However, Foma notes on their website that this film is suited by slightly unfavorable lighting conditions, so I'm thinking the shadows might look more pleasing if it's shot at 400 instead of 200. Foma suggests it can be shot at up to 800 speed without adjusting processing at all. I guess I'll have the chance to find out!

I've seen this film described as a mixture of traditional cubic as well as more modern tabular grain, which might be why the shadows act so oddly with negative compensation. Foma, rather unintelligibly, describes it thus: "properties of hexagonal core/shell tabular silver halide grains."
 

agentlossing

All-Pro
Location
S. Oregon Coast (the Northernmost-Cal of them All)
Real Name
Andrew Lossing
I really like Foma 100, this is way different stuff though. I have three hand-rolled rolls (the first two I may have scratched all up, we will see. I didn't fully grasp the orientation of the spindle + emulsion side + correct way to wind on the film, so I had to reroll them more times than I'm ready to admit to anyone) ready to go, and loaded one into the 500G to take some snapshots with. Hopefully more coming soon.
 

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