Film Delving Into Fomapan 200

agentlossing

All-Pro
Location
S. Oregon Coast (the Northernmost-Cal of them All)
Real Name
Andrew Lossing
I just developed only the second roll of Fomapan 200 that I've shot, and I find it a very different film. Unique, and kind of hard to wrap my head around. It's well spoken of, and often out of stock, pointing to either higher demand, or more difficulty in manufacturing than Foma 100 and 400. I decided to snap up a 100' roll on Adorama, which hasn't arrived yet, but developing this roll has reminded me that it's not going to be the relative cakewalk that shooting Foma 100 is. Foma 200 is less easy to anticipate. Also not that easy to scan, at least using Silverfast. So I decided to create this thread to go into my observations using it, above and beyond what I'd want to post in the showcase thread for this film. Oh, and observations and recommendations are appreciated. I'd like to get the best out of this film, since I sort of committed myself to shooting around 18-20 rolls of the stuff...

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agentlossing

All-Pro
Location
S. Oregon Coast (the Northernmost-Cal of them All)
Real Name
Andrew Lossing
I'm thinking slight underexposure might suit this film well. The normal exposures above tended to produce pretty flat negatives, and one thing I noticed in scanning them was that the film really doesn't like any negative exposure adjustment being added during scanning. Shadows, which tend to look dark gray, get chunky with erratic blocks of black when trying to lower the exposure. However, Foma notes on their website that this film is suited by slightly unfavorable lighting conditions, so I'm thinking the shadows might look more pleasing if it's shot at 400 instead of 200. Foma suggests it can be shot at up to 800 speed without adjusting processing at all. I guess I'll have the chance to find out!

I've seen this film described as a mixture of traditional cubic as well as more modern tabular grain, which might be why the shadows act so oddly with negative compensation. Foma, rather unintelligibly, describes it thus: "properties of hexagonal core/shell tabular silver halide grains."
 
Location
Central Florida
Real Name
Timothy Williams
These are very nice. I have heard from another film shooter that he really liked Foma. I'm going to have to give it a go, that is if I get through these 20 some odd rolls of T Max, HP5 and what ever in the hell else I have in the fridge. I'm behind.
 

agentlossing

All-Pro
Location
S. Oregon Coast (the Northernmost-Cal of them All)
Real Name
Andrew Lossing
I really like Foma 100, this is way different stuff though. I have three hand-rolled rolls (the first two I may have scratched all up, we will see. I didn't fully grasp the orientation of the spindle + emulsion side + correct way to wind on the film, so I had to reroll them more times than I'm ready to admit to anyone) ready to go, and loaded one into the 500G to take some snapshots with. Hopefully more coming soon.
 

agentlossing

All-Pro
Location
S. Oregon Coast (the Northernmost-Cal of them All)
Real Name
Andrew Lossing
Well, I shot a couple rolls in the past couple weeks, and developed them yesterday. I am still shooting at 200, but developed these in Rodinal 1:25 instead of 1:50 for the last ones, with a bit more aggressive agitation (first full minute instead of 30 seconds, ten seconds a minute instead of 5). I like the look of these a little better, they have more contrast but are very sharp, and have good detail retention such that a few of these I really dialed down highlights or opened up shadows in post. The shadows ones are obvious because they take on a really grainy look, but I was surprised that I was able to at all. Highlights recover beautifully, better than Foma 100 I am thinking, which has a propensity for those highlights to burn a little.

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These were also the first couple rolls which I hand-loaded, which took an embarrassing amount of times to figure out which way the film needed to face and be wound... so the scratches were expected.
 

agentlossing

All-Pro
Location
S. Oregon Coast (the Northernmost-Cal of them All)
Real Name
Andrew Lossing
Shot another roll (on a rather beat-up Olympus XA with some light leaks due to completely disintegrated light seals), this one at ISO 400, developed in Rodinal 1:25 for 8 minutes. Same agitation pattern as the above post. This film pushes one stop without breaking a sweat, I think it could go another stop, and also 1:25 is an excellent recipe.

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Untitled (11) by Andrew Lossing, on Flickr

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Untitled (14) by Andrew Lossing, on Flickr

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Untitled (22) by Andrew Lossing, on Flickr

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Untitled (25) by Andrew Lossing, on Flickr

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Untitled (38) by Andrew Lossing, on Flickr
 

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