Digitizing slides....

Landshark

PhotoDog
Jul 15, 2010
124
SoCal
Bob
Picture Libraries, Magazines, the Publishing and Repro. industries are all now quite happy with jpgs. The difference between jpg. at the lowest compression rate and tiff is minimal at best and impossible to see at worst. I've been sending out jpgs. for use as cover images for glossy magazines, A3 double page spreads, billboards and high end advertising campaigns for years. Virtually every reproduced image you see is printed from a jpg.
In my work jpegs are only used for editing, approvals, and interntet release for press use.
For all retouching, advertising, marketing, packaging use only raw or tiffs are used.
Also these are huge files shot on medium format digital backs mostly.
I store my stuff in raw and tiffs on multiple hard drives, the clients store images in tiffs and jpegs on dvds, external hard drives and servers. For me it depends on what they will do with the images, if they are going to leave them as they are jpegs are fine, if at some point they want play with them I would store tiffs.
 

BBW

Administrator Emeritus
Jul 7, 2010
123
betwixt and between
BB
sorry, I cannot cut and paste the url correctly, please google "fujifilm photo rescue project" and you will find the correct links.
Thank you for your efforts AldPixto. Next time you're here please stop over to our Welcomes and Introductions forum for a quick hello.

Meanwhile you guys, I need to ask you to get back to my questions for my friend. She is not going to do this herself...think Luddite!:biggrin: So it seems that she'd be better off using one of the companies such as Ray and James suggested. But how about my follow-up questions regarding cleaning slides..is "lighter fluid" with a Q-tip, the way to go? Sounds a bit dicey to me.
 

Landshark

PhotoDog
Jul 15, 2010
124
SoCal
Bob
All I can say is I sell between 10-15,000 images per year, for advertising, editorial and publishing. All are jpgs.
I am glad that works out for you but in my part of the photo industry none of the agencies or other clients I work with will take jpegs unless that is all there is, all of the photographers both unit and special are required to deliver raws or tiffs. Everybody wants the largest uncompressed file possible. Most of these jobs are buy out/ work for hire stuff so they get what they want. Any frame could end up on bus side or bus shelter they need the large files.
And since we are throwing out numbers my jobs average anywhere between 5000 to 7000 frames of 75mb to 100mb raw files that process out to 96mb to 175mb tiff image files per shoot, per day
 

Brian

Top Veteran
Jul 7, 2010
103
Cleaning slides.

Just a random google search, looks good.

Cleaning 35mm Slides, 35mm Film, 35mm Negatives and Other Films

I also note that they offer a slide scanning service at $0.39 per slide.

and 10 free.

35mm Special Free offer

I don't think the OPs friend is going to want to store Terabytes of Data. Chances are, they want to look at there scanned slides easily, load them into a digital frame, print, etc.

24-bit scans are fine for this, JPEG is fine for the file format. A JPEG setting of "12" with Photoshop is lossless. All of the frequency components are stored, and stored images can be reconstituted into their original form. In 20 years, it will be easy to pull up the JPEG and view it.

After 10 years with a TIFF file stored in some allowable option in the standard that was no longer implemented by modern software, I had to write custom software to unpack the images. Reading the TIFF 6.0 specification is great reading, if you like machine code. Writing software to unpack images stored in obsolete formats is something that most people do not enjoy doing. I use FORTRAN, and have been using it to process digital images for over 30 years. Digital scanners for film used to fill up an entire Lab. PDP-8 "Scanning Densitometer". I guess they shortened the name to "scanner" when they got smaller. I also had to write a RAW processor for my first DSLR. 20 years old this coming year. If anyone has Kodak ".KC2" format files, I can send you FORTRAN code to convert them to ".BMP". Lossless, of course.
 
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soundimageplus

Top Veteran
Jul 6, 2010
103
And since we are throwing out numbers my jobs average anywhere between 5000 to 7000 frames of 75mb to 100mb raw files that process out to 96mb to 175mb tiff image files per shoot, per day
I'm trying to work out exactly what kind of work requires that number of images per day. I'd be interested to know what you shoot.
 

Landshark

PhotoDog
Jul 15, 2010
124
SoCal
Bob
I shoot entertainment advertising, editorial and publicity campaigns for movies and television, The average show gallery(term for the photo shoot) has a cast of between 5 to 12 people, usually the whole years art work needs to be shot in one day, the shopping list is usually 2 or 3 pr single setups per actor, 3 to 8 ad single setups, 3 to 6 group shots, plus plate shots of the set and props; each setup averages between 100 to 250 frames.
Each setup has to be built,dressed and pre-lit before we start shooting, the actors are just walked to each setup without any wait time, here are couple of examples; the first was all done in parts on the same day the second was done in many parts shot over 5 days,the set one day in a studio, the actors over 3 days on location,one day background plates
View attachment 46095

View attachment 46096
 

soundimageplus

Top Veteran
Jul 6, 2010
103
Fascinating. Though I must admit, I started feeling pressured just reading your description!

I'd love to continue this conversation, but this has now gone way "off message" as far as BB's original post is concerned, and I'm not sure medium format digital backs could be described as a serious compact!

Maybe we could move it to somewhere more appropriate?

I shoot entertainment advertising, editorial and publicity campaigns for movies and television, The average show gallery(term for the photo shoot) has a cast of between 5 to 12 people, usually the whole years art work needs to be shot in one day, the shopping list is usually 2 or 3 pr single setups per actor, 3 to 8 ad single setups, 3 to 6 group shots, plus plate shots of the set and props; each setup averages between 100 to 250 frames.
Each setup has to be built,dressed and pre-lit before we start shooting, the actors are just walked to each setup without any wait time, here are couple of examples; the first was all done in parts on the same day the second was done in many parts shot over 5 days,the set one day in a studio, the actors over 3 days on location,one day background plates
View attachment 46098

View attachment 46099
 

Landshark

PhotoDog
Jul 15, 2010
124
SoCal
Bob
you are right we got way off topic, we certainly can continue the discussion elseware, I am open to suggestions
 
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soundimageplus

Top Veteran
Jul 6, 2010
103
How about if you re-posted your piece about what you do in a new thread in the image processing section? Maybe something along the lines of "bulk processing" "coping with high intensity shooting" or something similar?

I'd be fascinated to know how you cope with this. I've done something similar for model agencies, but nothing thats quite as intense as what you do. Hopefully others might find it as interesting as I do.


you are right we got way off topic, we certainly can continue the discussion elseware, I am open to suggestions
 
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BBW

Administrator Emeritus
Jul 7, 2010
123
betwixt and between
BB
Thanks so much, Brian! I'm going to send my friend over here to read what you and others have posted.:drinks:

And Bob and David - that new thread is a good idea and I've no doubt you'll have quite a few readers.:thumbup:
 

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