EVF free

Streetshooter

Administrator Emeritus
Jul 12, 2010
123
Philly, Pa
Ok, you are working on this....good.
Think about Scrabble. You know how the words connect both vertically and horizontally?
Well the letter tha connects the words together is in photography, a transitional image.
That means that a certain image fits the group but has a fairy dust that could lead to another direction. These are not easily recognizable but crucial for future work.

The connect your body of work with your signature and create the map of your life's work.
 
D

dixeyk

Guest
I've been looking at my work. I've been going through it trying to find the threads. Which ones stand out and try to understand what it is about them that makes them so. Its a bit like therapy honestly. The pictures you take reveal a lot about you. The wok is just beginning and given the nature of this kind of thing it my never truly end but gaining a greater understanding of ones self and ones art is an essential part of being truly alive. I can share on thing so far, the image that I keeping coming back to is this...



It's my son. I don't know why it has such a hold on me but it does. Its the image that started me down this path. That's so like him.

Kevin
 

Luckypenguin

Hall of Famer
Dec 24, 2010
124
Brisbane, Australia
Nic
I don't walk around or drive my car using a periscope, why should I be forced to shoot my camera with one? I just want to see a frame, the tunnel vision is an optional extra that I want to uncheck.
 

Streetshooter

Administrator Emeritus
Jul 12, 2010
123
Philly, Pa
Nic, Newley weds are not allowed an opinion without the spouses approval... even tho I like what and how you stated what you did.

Kevin. I'm sure you are aware of the placement of the frame...right? This is a signal about framing you may see in other images. Funny, I just did a photo very similar...
View attachment 45029
11-11-0210-Edit-Edit.jpg by streetshooter.us, on Flickr

We see eye to eye we do...
 

Luckypenguin

Hall of Famer
Dec 24, 2010
124
Brisbane, Australia
Nic
Nic, Newley weds are not allowed an opinion without the spouses approval... even tho I like what and how you stated what you did.
Wife agrees. I hand her the E-PL1 to take a photo, no complaints (except for the usual "Where's the zoom?"..."It's on the lens, you twist the lens"...or..."Where's the zoom?"..."There is none"..."Well, what good is that?"..."Give me the camera back..."). GH1, same story. DSLR..."Where's the picture"..."You look through the viewfinder"..."Why?"...

Good question.
 
D

dixeyk

Guest
Sorry for displaying my complete ignorance...Placement of Image? I know the rule of thirds (I was a graphic designer in a former life). Is that in the same time zone?


Nic,

"Where's the zoom?"..."It's on the lens, you twist the lens"...or..."Where's the zoom?"..."There is none"..."Well, what good is that?"..."Give me the camera back..."). GH1, same story. DSLR..."Where's the picture"..."You look through the viewfinder"..."Why?"...
Hilarious...been there, done that.



Nic, Newley weds are not allowed an opinion without the spouses approval... even tho I like what and how you stated what you did.

Kevin. I'm sure you are aware of the placement of the frame...right? This is a signal about framing you may see in other images. Funny, I just did a photo very similar...
View attachment 45038
11-11-0210-Edit-Edit.jpg by streetshooter.us, on Flickr

We see eye to eye we do...
 
Jan 31, 2011
164
Newcastle, Australia
Sue
For now, I would suggest you sort and find your favorite images. Don't think in terms of subject matter, just the images.

Then, sort by lens to find the common denominator in this group. This will help you eliminate different focal lengths until needed.
After you SEE this group of images, try to define what each means on its own and in a group.
Then try to group the images so that the group reads nice, like prose or poetry.
I know this was directed at the OP but geez, what excellent advice! Thanks!
 

Streetshooter

Administrator Emeritus
Jul 12, 2010
123
Philly, Pa
Here's something I started writing on a blog and at a discussion at another forum.

Recently I was involved in a discussion at serious compacts.com. We were talking about the differences and merits of the screen and the finders on compact cameras.*

Lets establish what photography is to start. The process of image making is about abstracting from a 3 dimensional reality a new 2 dimensional reality. Regardless of what camera you use or how you process your images, this is what we are all doing as photographers.*
For me, it makes common sense to use a screen set to B&W. Why? Glad you asked.*
I am using the GXR for now and probably will be for a long spell. I hold the camera out in front or on some angle, depending on what I;m seeing. At this point, I can see my PRINT floating in reality. I see a B&W image in 2 dimensions in our 3 dimensional reality. It's exciting. Why do I use B&W on the screen? If in fact, the camera abstracts a new reality, then it stands to reason the seeing the image on the screen in B&W further abstracts the reality.
Sounds too heavy or too abstract? What do you think your doing making photos? Your making a new reality in the image. It stands on it's own. It is it's own object in 2 dimensions.

The EVF. These finders essentially do the same thing but they don't show the image or PRINT in 3 dimensional reality. The reason is that your camera is against your face. So you can't see the image floating in reality, just an image on a screen.*

The OVF. This finder like the one in the X100 is an engineering marvel but it also lacks the power to present your image in reality. Your face is still smashed against the camera.*

Working the street with a screen does a few important things. It allows you to look like a tourist or amatuer and blend in with everyone else out there. This simple fact is crucial to getting in closer. You actually go unnoticed most times, not always but most. This method also allows the camera to float in space and get a different angle that a finder can not do. The screen is not a new phenomonom. It dates back to the beginning of photography with view cameras.*
The screen is an active way of working. If your doing portraits or snaps of people, it allows eye contact. This can be very important to sensitive subjects in very sensitive times.*
You can get eye contact with finders also but your face is hidden behind the camera and this can be a put off to some.*

The finders on the other hand, have the advantage of being better in bright light.*
I have to admit, I've never had any luck with any EVF in contrasty light.*
So what does all this mean? It means that I prefer the screen for all it's advantages in composing my frame. I can see all around the frame easily and quickly decide what's in and what's out.

The EVF does not offer that important element. The OVF does but in a limited capacity.

I fell in love with the idea of the X100 and it's finder when it first was mentioned. I knew the camera would give me the feelings of my Leica M cameras. In a way it did but only in a way. After many months and many good images, I realized that I felt more self conscious using the camera.*
So I put it on the shelf and started with a few compacts. Luckily I just got my GRD3 back after 2 years. In 1 day of shooting, I confirmed my feelings about the finder on the X100. I never touched the X100 again until I sold it a month ago. Great camera just not my cup of tea anymore.*

I'm not trying to convince anyone of anything. I'm just stating my thoughts on a subject that's crucial to photography.....SEEING!
 
D

dixeyk

Guest
Amazing way to look at it.

I think I see what you're saying...you are using the LCD as a away of visualizing the end point of the process (the print). It makes perfect sense. When I am using the EVF I am immersing myself in the scene to the extent that it becomes more an act of documentation rather than creation. I find EVFs convenient in that they make things clearer but I feel like I'm missing the greater picture (no pun intended). Its like creating a photograph can happen in a very nuts and bolts see, frame, focus and click sort of way but that isn't all there is. It can also be an act of perception and creation that happens and I think THAT is what I see when I look at some peoples work that seems to be wholly different than anything I've ever seen.

I have soooo much to learn. Better get crackin'



Here's something I started writing on a blog and at a discussion at another forum.

Recently I was involved in a discussion at serious compacts.com. We were talking about the differences and merits of the screen and the finders on compact cameras.*

Lets establish what photography is to start. The process of image making is about abstracting from a 3 dimensional reality a new 2 dimensional reality. Regardless of what camera you use or how you process your images, this is what we are all doing as photographers.*
For me, it makes common sense to use a screen set to B&W. Why? Glad you asked.*
I am using the GXR for now and probably will be for a long spell. I hold the camera out in front or on some angle, depending on what I;m seeing. At this point, I can see my PRINT floating in reality. I see a B&W image in 2 dimensions in our 3 dimensional reality. It's exciting. Why do I use B&W on the screen? If in fact, the camera abstracts a new reality, then it stands to reason the seeing the image on the screen in B&W further abstracts the reality.
Sounds too heavy or too abstract? What do you think your doing making photos? Your making a new reality in the image. It stands on it's own. It is it's own object in 2 dimensions.

The EVF. These finders essentially do the same thing but they don't show the image or PRINT in 3 dimensional reality. The reason is that your camera is against your face. So you can't see the image floating in reality, just an image on a screen.*

The OVF. This finder like the one in the X100 is an engineering marvel but it also lacks the power to present your image in reality. Your face is still smashed against the camera.*

Working the street with a screen does a few important things. It allows you to look like a tourist or amatuer and blend in with everyone else out there. This simple fact is crucial to getting in closer. You actually go unnoticed most times, not always but most. This method also allows the camera to float in space and get a different angle that a finder can not do. The screen is not a new phenomonom. It dates back to the beginning of photography with view cameras.*
The screen is an active way of working. If your doing portraits or snaps of people, it allows eye contact. This can be very important to sensitive subjects in very sensitive times.*
You can get eye contact with finders also but your face is hidden behind the camera and this can be a put off to some.*

The finders on the other hand, have the advantage of being better in bright light.*
I have to admit, I've never had any luck with any EVF in contrasty light.*
So what does all this mean? It means that I prefer the screen for all it's advantages in composing my frame. I can see all around the frame easily and quickly decide what's in and what's out.

The EVF does not offer that important element. The OVF does but in a limited capacity.

I fell in love with the idea of the X100 and it's finder when it first was mentioned. I knew the camera would give me the feelings of my Leica M cameras. In a way it did but only in a way. After many months and many good images, I realized that I felt more self conscious using the camera.*
So I put it on the shelf and started with a few compacts. Luckily I just got my GRD3 back after 2 years. In 1 day of shooting, I confirmed my feelings about the finder on the X100. I never touched the X100 again until I sold it a month ago. Great camera just not my cup of tea anymore.*

I'm not trying to convince anyone of anything. I'm just stating my thoughts on a subject that's crucial to photography.....SEEING!
 

Luckypenguin

Hall of Famer
Dec 24, 2010
124
Brisbane, Australia
Nic
Kevin, I don't see your approach to making an image as being wrong. It sounds like you've already resolved to try the LCD approach for a period and that's great, but if you find yourself going back to the EVF at the end of it then the exercise was still a success because you'd have proved conclusively what works best for you.

It's also possible to look through an OVF/EVF and keep your other eye open, but this is also a good recipe for a headache if used excessively.
 
D

dixeyk

Guest
Kevin, I don't see your approach to making an image as being wrong. It sounds like you've already resolved to try the LCD approach for a period and that's great, but if you find yourself going back to the EVF at the end of it then the exercise was still a success because you'd have proved conclusively what works best for you.

It's also possible to look through an OVF/EVF and keep your other eye open, but this is also a good recipe for a headache if used excessively.
Ture enough...if I find I'm EVF sort of guy that's fine as well. That said, I am looking forward to exploring what I can do with the camera and sometimes a limitation can really speak the creative. I look at the work form you, Don and Lilli (just to name a few) and I see something special. Part of it is an intimate understanding of the art in ways that I do not (I don't mean that as a complaint either...I have always felt you gotta be honest about what you are and aren't before you can grow). Its nice to have a community.

BTW, I tried that one eye open stuff and you're right, I had to have the Alleve on hand. :eek:
 

Streetshooter

Administrator Emeritus
Jul 12, 2010
123
Philly, Pa
Well, I was always a 2 eye shooter with the M. It's easy but putting the camera to the face triggers the other eye to close. It's something one has to learn and the make it a habit.

Please know that I am speaking about how I work and think. It's not right for everybody but I'll never inderstand why not. Nah... I gotz no modesty at all....

Nic of course is right about the result of the experiment.
I look forward to your findings and images.
 
Interesting thread,

I used to be an avid EVF/OVF user and scoffed at the idea of using the LCD. To me the EVF/OVF was a frame that removed distractions and allowed you a view as similar to the final image as you could get.

Then I got the Sony NEX 5N and decided to finally try and shoot just using the LCD and at first it seems plain weird - like driving an unfamiliar car I guess. After a while you begin to see differently. Your POV is generally lower which suits me because I often shoot from the hip with my Ricoh GRD3 (now GRD IV) - I like that lower perspective. Those distractions I talked about can so easily be elements that would make a good shot a great shot, or a warning that you better shoot quick before the moment is gone.

I also shoot in b&w now but unlike Don I do so purely because focus peaking works better in b&w! I don't really see the final image on the LCD. Instead I see it with my eyes and then look down on the LCD and adjust the settings, zoom with my feet, focus and frame and hope the shot turns out nice. :biggrin:

I can't envisage me ever using a VF for street work, shooting from the hip or with the LCD I'm comfortable with. For everything else? Well, I'm still torn. I think both methods have their merits and disadvantages..
 

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