Flaw Found in Key Method for Protecting Data on the Internet

BBW

Administrator Emeritus
Jul 7, 2010
123
betwixt and between
BB
I need some clarification about what you two, Sue and Mark, are referring to when you write about "standing in line, paying bills". Do you mean going to the post office and mailing out your letters/bills? I still do mail some bills with checks in - but just throw them in the mailbox...though I must say here in the rural part of Connecticut there aren't any mailboxes except outside the local post office. Back in my previous home we had mailboxes around the town...though they had become more scarce due to the US Postal Service slowly dwindling...

And yes, Mark - I, too, want to keep people employed! I'd be very sad not to have our local rural mail carrier who will even zoom up our long craggily driveway to deliver something big and then talk to me for a few minutes.:wink:

Oh, and by the way I wrote to Amazon's customer service about this "breach" and they assured me they were very well protected. Had to laugh, but I hope they're right!

P.S. Uh oh, I see Paul has come out - twice no less!:eek::rofl:
 

Biro

Super Moderator
Aug 7, 2011
124
Jersey Shore
Steve
Here's a short excerpt from a Bloomberg News article on the story:

"Google and Facebook Inc. said in e-mailed statements yesterday that their properties aren’t vulnerable to the flaw. Tests on the home pages of other large technology, e-commerce and banking companies including Microsoft Corp., Amazon.com Inc. and Bank of America Corp. indicated they weren’t vulnerable. The U.S. Internal Revenue Service said it isn’t affected by the flaw and is accepting tax returns as normal, while continuing to monitor the situation."

Also... here's a website where you can check on a vulnerability of a given site: http://filippo.io/Heartbleed/

Also, I'm another one who pays most of his bills via check and snailmail. But I have no doubt those of us who still prefer this method will soon be forced to do everything electronically - with all that entails both good and bad. I refuse to do my banking online - not because I'm a luddite (I work with high tech all day) but because I know better. The companies always insist it's completely safe. Until they tell you it isn't.
 

stillshunter

Super Moderator Emeritus
Nov 5, 2010
123
Down Under
Mark
I need some clarification about what you two, Sue and Mark, are referring to when you write about "standing in line, paying bills". Do you mean going to the post office and mailing out your letters/bills?
Australia Post are agents for most utility providers - failing that you can use their BPay (electronic payment) service for any bill - though this just shifts the electronic security problem from your PC to theirs :wink: So bills can be paid over the counter at the Post Office which I often do while they are rummaging for my next photo parcel. :blush:

Uh oh, I see Paul has come out - twice no less!:eek::rofl:
Yeah I heard the clanging of the sandwich board he's wearing before the spruiking and bell-ringing began :wink:
 
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BBW

Administrator Emeritus
Jul 7, 2010
123
betwixt and between
BB
Thanks, Steve - for the link, the excerpts and for your thoughts about online banking. I have to admit that I've gotten really used to using it for 90% of my bills... I was also thinking about the youngest among us here and "out there" - that use their cell phones to do just about everything financial.

Ah, Mark - thank you for explaining the cultural differences regarding postal services! I do love that image of you waiting as they rummage for your "next photo parcel"!!:biggrin:
 

Chris2500dk

Top Veteran
Dec 22, 2011
104
Copenhagen, Denmark
We've reached the point here where it's practically impossible to get around online banking. Paying your bills at the register at the bank or post office costs around $7 per bill, paying them online is free.
 
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Jan 31, 2011
164
Newcastle, Australia
Sue
I need some clarification about what you two, Sue and Mark, are referring to when you write about "standing in line, paying bills".
When I said that, I was actually referring to a time where you would actually go to the front desk of the utility company, or the phone company or whatever, to pay the current bill. It could take nearly a half day to get it all done. I've never used the post office to do it, but was able to do it all at my bank for a while until I discovered BPay. I even pay my lawn guys with BPay. Open bank account online, choose payee, send money, done.

Now, on a more serious note...
http://heartbleed.com

You can use the following link to plug in a website you might be concerned about: I have no idea if its really reliable but TUAW seemed to think it was/is
http://filippo.io/Heartbleed/

Apple said its key web services are not affected (more info at the link)
http://recode.net/2014/04/10/apple-says-ios-osx-and-key-web-services-not-affected-by-heartbleed-security-flaw/

And why that is
http://www.tuaw.com/2014/04/09/why-the-openssl-heartbleed-bug-doesnt-affect-os-x-or-os-x-serve/

But, changing passwords is a good idea, just in case some random ******* managed to find yours
http://www.tuaw.com/2014/04/10/tips-to-manage-your-passwords-and-protect-yourself-from-heartble/

Mashable has a list of sites which are/were affected and where you should change your pass. Its now a couple of days, I'm betting the patches have been applied, and its probably too late so I did not bother. Some of you might want to.
http://mashable.com/2014/04/09/heartbleed-bug-websites-affected/

And, if you happen to be someone who uses LastPass for password management, it now checks your stored services for vulnerability
http://blog.lastpass.com/2014/04/lastpass-now-checks-if-your-sites-are.html
 
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