Philosophy Found an Interview with working Pro using vintage compacts

sh0wtime

Veteran
Aug 20, 2011
Surrey/Hants border UK
Adam.
Hi guys.
was just browsing the net (like you do) & stumbled across this interview..

quite liked the concept :)

although it's very "niche", i can't imagine there would be a lot of mainstream demand..
 

agentlossing

Top Veteran
Definitely an interesting article, and while I get the aesthetic of "vintage digital" I wonder how many keepers she would get, as opposed to messy images that just fall apart. It can't be easy to control imperfections. I personally have mixed experiences with old-timey digital; I started with a 2MP Olympus zoom, and it was abysmal, way too early to have any charm, then I leaped forward to a 6MP Nikon D40, which had all the CCD charm but lacked the small-sensor, fixed lens look. I am still tempted to buy an old D40x, which I think is a 10MP version of the D40, just to have a CCD APS-C sensor.
 
Oct 19, 2016
West side O'ahu, Hawai'i
Greg Leong
I think, for the purposes of her work (web publications and slick print), these cameras are fine. Her choices certainly set her apart. I like her work, for the most part. On a personal level, I don’t have a camera, save two, that resolves more than 16 mp. My favorites are 12 mp and the resulting images are fine (for web and print).
 

Jonathan F/2

Top Veteran
Aug 21, 2011
Los Angeles, USA
Considering you can buy a minty used a Sony APS-C NEX 16mp camera for $50-100 and also M43 and Nikon 1 bodies in that price range, I don't see the point with some of these lesser cameras.

I bought my daughter a cheap Sony NEX-5T as her knock-around camera, I just set it on raw and told her to just shoot so she can focus on her composition. Afterwards I go in and edit the results! On the plus side, it mounts all my Sony E-mount lenses and I could use it an emergency backup when needed! :D
 

Tilman Paulin

All-Pro
Nov 15, 2011
Vancouver B.C.
Tilman
In my experience some of these old compacts have great lenses. And once you know the limitations of the sensor you know how you can use them (and what to avoid)

If you have an idea of what you want to photograph - and have some control over your photographic subject and its environment (as in controlled portraits) you can definitely get some nice photos.

It was mostly for landscape photos, etc. with completely uncontrollable lighting and loads of fine details - or anything that requires very fast autofocus - where these small sensor compacts ran into their biggest limitations...
 

sh0wtime

Veteran
Aug 20, 2011
Surrey/Hants border UK
Adam.
Definitely an interesting article, and while I get the aesthetic of "vintage digital" I wonder how many keepers she would get, as opposed to messy images that just fall apart. It can't be easy to control imperfections. I personally have mixed experiences with old-timey digital; I started with a 2MP Olympus zoom, and it was abysmal, way too early to have any charm, then I leaped forward to a 6MP Nikon D40, which had all the CCD charm but lacked the small-sensor, fixed lens look. I am still tempted to buy an old D40x, which I think is a 10MP version of the D40, just to have a CCD APS-C sensor.
Yes the D40x is a 10mp CCD. depending on what you're used to you might find the control interface frustrating as you have to dip in & out of menus to make changes, it has no front wheel adjuster etc.
if you wanted a 10MP CCD in a solid easy to use body then look at a D200 , sell for peanuts nowadays. Bigger & heavier than a D40x though...
Heavy on batteries as well, worth carrying a spare on a day trip.
 

sh0wtime

Veteran
Aug 20, 2011
Surrey/Hants border UK
Adam.
In my experience some of these old compacts have great lenses. And once you know the limitations of the sensor you know how you can use them (and what to avoid)

If you have an idea of what you want to photograph - and have some control over your photographic subject and its environment (as in controlled portraits) you can definitely get some nice photos.

It was mostly for landscape photos, etc. with completely uncontrollable lighting and loads of fine details - or anything that requires very fast autofocus - where these small sensor compacts ran into their biggest limitations...
Exactly this. Shoot to it's strengths & avoid any weakness you already know will be there.
i guess for web, Instagram and social media a compact is perfect. much less obvious or intrusive..
 

sh0wtime

Veteran
Aug 20, 2011
Surrey/Hants border UK
Adam.
I am still tempted to buy an old D40x, which I think is a 10MP version of the D40, just to have a CCD APS-C sensor.
One from my D200 from back in 2010, i hadn't discovered RAW then so this is (as far as i can remember) a JPEG SOOC.
I remember it really liking reds & blues.
This was taken with the 18-70mm lens as well, great value & often thrown in with cameras when sold :thumbsup:

Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 

agentlossing

Top Veteran
Yes the D40x is a 10mp CCD. depending on what you're used to you might find the control interface frustrating as you have to dip in & out of menus to make changes, it has no front wheel adjuster etc.
if you wanted a 10MP CCD in a solid easy to use body then look at a D200 , sell for peanuts nowadays. Bigger & heavier than a D40x though...
Heavy on batteries as well, worth carrying a spare on a day trip.
I know the D40 cameras pretty well, it was my only camera from 2006 to 2013! Can't last that long on a single camera body anymore, that's for sure (but I blame the pace of innovation).
 
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sh0wtime

Veteran
Aug 20, 2011
Surrey/Hants border UK
Adam.
There's an optimistic take! No, wait, that's a pessimistic take. Uh...?
bit of both i guess. the "improvements" on the new stuff is more incremental now rather than the giant leaps we've experienced in the last 15 years or so...

Which for most of us means we can use stuff thats a generation or so behind without giving up too much to the people with the "latest & greatest".
My change from D2Xs to the D3 was the biggest improvement i experienced, i have often described the D3 as a gamechanger. it was.
However when i bought a D4 i didn't feel i got a lot more for my money.
The D800 was a quantum leap from the D700 in both resolution & DR but the D810 offered only marginal improvements on the 800.
i know it was more of a refresh to fix a few things but in reality that refresh makes a massive difference to the user experience but very little to the output.

As much as i like the idea of a D5 or D850 i can't really justify the expenditure. i've not really shot anything properly for a couple of years (paid events etc) so my D4 & D810 combo will have to do me for now. D3, old faithful will come along as backup :thumbsup:
 
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