Fuji X-PRO 1 Fully Leaked by French Magazine 'Responses Photo'

Pelao

All-Pro
Jul 11, 2010
123
Ontario, Canada
Stephen
I can't really tell the size from the info available. But for me, size is a relative thing: i look at the bulk of the overall package. If this lives up to it's potential, it will offer the IQ I am seeking, the primes I like and will be able to use the same bag as my M4/3 kit. Cool.

Stillshunter: I agree re the lenses and Sony. I am very interested in the Nex 7. The lenses seem to perform well, but apart from the (pricey) 24, they are, for me, odd focal lengths.

Fuji seem to have some actual photographers in the company.
 

pawzitiv

Regular
Dec 9, 2011
33
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Fuji has offered some exquisite cameras (both film and digital) in the past and superb optics .. I expect the X-PRO 1 will be every bit as good. However, assuming the lens shown is roughly the size of an M-mount 35/1.4 lens, this camera would appear to be about the same size as a Leica M8 or Epson R-D1s (both of which I own). I don't think it will be as petite as a Minolta CLE.

Perhaps if the X-PRO 1 grows a shutter cocking lever, loses video capabilities and gains an M-mount adapter, I may have found a worthy replacement for BOTH my Epson R-D1s and Leica M8.:flypig:

I do see this as a camera of interest to those desiring an interchangeable lens equivalent of the X100 or those lusting after a Leica-esque body that has somewhat more affordable fast lenses available than what Leica offers (or both).

If, indeed, it's as small as the Minolta CLE and can use M-mount lenses via an adapter, I might just have to try the X-PRO 1.
 

Luke

Super Moderator
Nov 11, 2011
214
Milwaukee, WI USA
Luke
I'm not sure they will be able to keep the X100 sales up anymore if this test group is anything to judge the camera-buying public by. Maybe the X100 was just a publicly funded R & D project for the X-S1.
 

Michael

Rookie
Sep 7, 2010
3
Western Australia
When Fuji last made 35mm cameras and lenses they were the equal of Topcon, Pentax and Canon FD (these were some that I used!). Recently my jaw dropped when I saw on eBAY an Xmount 35mm Fujica with a 50mm 1.6 lens sell for under $10 and a Topcor f1.4 for $500 (ebay's a crazy place!!) So if it is the same X mount as fuji used in the past there are a lot of good lenses already available for this new offering. There were a full range of primes, zooms and I think an M42 adaptor. They say this one has a 17.7mm flange-to-sensor distance so I think that would be good for many others too... Olympus better hurry up with their Pro M43.
 

soundimageplus

Top Veteran
Jul 6, 2010
103
I suspect this is going to be very much a "niche" camera. But that niche could be quite large. Last time I saw some figures Fuji had sold 70,000 of the X100, and they were apparently both pleased and surprised by that. Its very much in the "upmarket" compact(ish) market sector. The Contax G system has been mentioned and it seems that Fuji are going for this sector in the digital era.

It looks great, the lenses look great, but I'm hoping that they don't just turn out an X100 with interchangeable lenses. I had an x100, and while I appreciated its image quality, there were certainly operational issues, with overall sluggishness and that ill thought out menu system.

Fast primes, no AA filter is aimed straight for the "Leica envy" market. Sorry its such an unpleasant phrase, but I'm sure you know what I mean. Many photographers like the idea of Leicas, but not the price and the lack of options. There has always been a gaping hole to my mind in what camera manufacturers offer to this market.

Fuji took a punt on what seemed to them an opportunity, and they have been rewarded with a resounding success with the x100. M4/3 and NEX users seem to be split between those who have no interest whatsoever in something like the Fuji, and indeed probably think it looks and works like their "Grandads camera" and those who might be interested. Releasing a camera and 3 primes straight off is much more of an investment, and indeed a gamble, than the x100 ever was.

Fuji are to be applauded for giving this a try, and I don't think they will be disappointed by the reaction they get, or indeed initial sales, which I would assume will be substantial. I also think that they are in a much better position to estimate demand, and get the cameras and lenses to those who want them than they were before. The Tsunami obviously caused immense problems, and hopefully that, or something like it or the floods in Thailand, won't slow them up.

Its not however the "one true camera" and as someone once observed about the x100, "It won't solve world hunger!" but its a serious attempt to satisfy the demand for "nouveau retro" that is currently unsatisfied. Other manufacturers have had a dabble, the Olympus Pens, Panasonics GX1 and the NEX-7 (to a certain extent) are all moves to address that "old school looks, cutting edge technology" movement, and Fuji seem to have embraced it more enthusiastically than most.

Personally, the lack of an AA filter (if true) made me suddenly pay more attention. It would be nice if more camera manufacturers realised that this is something that many would like to see (and certainly something Sony could take note of) The GXR m-mount module(s) are a move in the right direction, and while some companies seem to be continually weakening their AA filters, few take the decision to remove it altogether. While on that point, isn't it about time anyway that we can get a sensor to record what our lenses are capable of without either having moire all over the results or some kind of visual "muffling" in place?

I must admit I wasn't sure at first but now I can feel my credit card getting VERY nervous. If the flange distance allows for alternative / legacy lenses then I may find my resistance crumbling altogether. Just as I thought I was "sorted" with the NEX-7 along comes this!! Why can't they all just stop and leave me in peace!
 

Iansky

All-Pro
Dec 8, 2011
123
Cotswolds, UK
the main appeal to me over a Leica is AF with fast lenses
One of the main reasons I got rid of my M8 was problems with manual focussing (my eyes) and the associated cost of dioptre lenses - IQ and LCD issues didn't help!

If the build quality surpasses the X100, OVF offers maginifed frame lines for appropriate lenses, IQ matches or betters X100 and the lenses are small, fast & metal and finally AF is fast and accurate, the body with 3 lenses will be on my wish list and I suspect will find it's way onto those longing for a Leica but holding back because of price - this could be a real killer of a camera that offers retro styling, tactile dials all in a solid body with up to the minute workings...........nice and possible price seems reasonable.
 

wt21

Hall of Famer
Aug 15, 2010
123
Doing a spot of online research on size.

I found one person's calculation (Fujifilm X-Pro1 details leaked!!!! - X100 Forum - Page 4), based on filter thread size of 52mm (not sure if that is confirmed), putting the body at 130mm long, 83mm high and 37mm deep (I would question that last one, but with a face-front pic, I suppose you could estimate L and W based on the filter size).

If that were the case, here are some sizes in L X W X H(from DPR)
Small DSLRs
T3i: 133 X 100 X 80
K5: 131 X 97 X 73

CSC
M9: 139 X 80 X 37
X-Pro1: 130 X 83 X 37
EP3: 122 X 69 X 34
NEX7: 120 X 67 X 43
P-G3: 115 X 84 X 47
EPM1: 110 X 64 X 34

Other Fuji, with integrated Lenses
X100: 126 X 75 X 54 (depth includes lens?)
X10: 117 X 70 X 57 (depth includes lens?)
 

retow

All-Pro
Jul 24, 2010
123
As far as size is concerned, the M9 size is ok, but it's a heavy body as well as its lenses. Fuji's body and lenses are hopefully lighter. Its grip promises superior ergonomics. There is no information whether it will have in body IS.
 

Ray Sachs

Legend
Sep 21, 2010
123
Not too far from Philly
you should be able to figure it out...
From the reaction to it, it seems the X100 menu system satisfied less than most.
True, only the Nex may have been less popular... :biggrin:

I never had any problems with either of them, once I figured them out. The only camera interface that I was never able to really wrap my head around and get to what I needed quickly and easily was the EPL1. I've never had any problems with the Nex, once I figured out how to customize the buttons, or the X100, once I figured out how it thought...

-Ray
 

Pelao

All-Pro
Jul 11, 2010
123
Ontario, Canada
Stephen
I've never had any problems with the Nex, once I figured out how to customize the buttons, or the X100, once I figured out how it thought...
I have read other posts where you have made similar observations. Always struck me as very astute: with a few exceptions, I have always managed to work with various menu designs. There are some I prefer (generally, I prefer Panasonic over Olympus), and occasionally there will be settings that make little sense. For example, I remember a lot of remarks around the X100's ISO menu.

For my shooting I actually don't spend a lot of time in menus. I set up my preferences, and arrange customizable buttons etc. After that, I rarely need to visit menus. This is especially the case for cameras with lots of external controls.

There are a number of things I hope are very good with this camera (AF, lens quality) but I am not worried about size or menus.

On paper at least it looks like it was designed by photographers for photographers. Refreshing.
 

Luckypenguin

Hall of Famer
Dec 24, 2010
123
Brisbane, Australia
Nic
Generally I think that differences in menus between brands/models isn't always a massive issue for the general usability of a camera, and it tends to be a personal thing anyway. Some might hate a system others swear by. The biggest UI issue I would have with this new Fuji (judging by the leaked images) is the use of old-school controls like the explicit shutter speed dial and lens-mounted aperture control. I may be in a minority of one but I feel that moving these two fundamental controls to ergonomically-placed, body-mounted control wheels and digital readouts was an advance in control camera, not a backward step.
 

Pelao

All-Pro
Jul 11, 2010
123
Ontario, Canada
Stephen
I may be in a minority of one but I feel that moving these two fundamental controls to ergonomically-placed, body-mounted control wheels and digital readouts was an advance in control camera, not a backward step.
I am all for well placed controls (and I doubt if I'll have a problem with the Fuji choices) but the only digital readout I like is in the VF. I strongly dislike having to look at a rear screen to see the changes I have made. I want it either in the VF or visible on the control.
 

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