Fuji Fuji X-S10

drd1135

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Steve
Not ready for a review, but here's a picture:
steelflower.jpg

A few observations:
1. It's similar in weight and size to the X-T30 (no surprise there) but the grip is great. It handles so much better with the 16-80 than the X-T30.
2. I'm quickly getting used to the Mode Dial and control dials. Just like Olympus.
3. IQ is the same as the X100V and X-T30 (no surprise again).
4. I went to set the iso to auto and accidentally set it to 51200. It's amazing how good they look on the little LCD. 😉
5. It's been a while since I had a FA LCD. They certainly are quick to deploy.
 
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drd1135

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Steve
I will post more tomorrow. I went out shooting today with the 16-80 and the grip really made the combination work. I am reminded of the first time I used an Olympus EM1. The huge grip on the Olympus really stood out when everyone first saw that camera, and it sort of defined the handling of that body. Same thing here. One good thing I noticed about the articulating screen is that I can actually leave the touchscreen activated without constantly hitting settings by accident. I rapidly got into the “open the screen to look and close it to shoot” mode. I also note that for architectural shooting the articulating screen makes it much easier to shoot at odd angles. Aside from that, the camera just disappeared and let me shoot without worrying about too much. Of course, the early morning light was wonderful and I suppose that had some effect.:biggrin:
 

Biro

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Steve
In my consideration of the X-S10, I find that I'm fine with the digital-era control dial set up versus Fuji's traditional SLR-type controls. And I love the grip, a la the X-H1. Plus, it's cheaper than the X-T4. The kit with the 16-80 zoom is $1499 versus $2199 with the X-T4. That's a $700 difference.

On the other hand, the X-T4 offers weather resistance and much longer battery life. Both are big pluses in my book, especially since the 16-80 and other Fuji lenses that I already own have WR. The X-T4 also has a high-resolution EVF - which is a plus but I should be able to live with the X-S10's viewfinder. On the downside, the X-T4 has a much smaller grip.

If I absolutely knew there would be an X-H2 within the next year, I might wait. But even if such a camera is coming, it's hard to know if its focus is going to change - perhaps it will be much more videocentric. But that top control LCD on the X-H1 is great.
 
On the other hand, the X-T4 offers weather resistance and much longer battery life. Both are big pluses in my book, especially since the 16-80 and other Fuji lenses that I already own have WR. The X-T4 also has a high-resolution EVF - which is a plus but I should be able to live with the X-S10's viewfinder.
Weather resistance is always a must have for my main camera. I'm in the same train of thought as you regarding the EVF. In my newly acquired X-T3, the EVF is flat out amazing. But that doesn't make me hate the EVF in the X-E3. It is still plenty usable. I find that it makes me appreciate the EVF in the X-T3 that much more when I use it. If you are narrowing down your kit and will only be shooting with one camera. I would go for the one with the better EVF.
 

drd1135

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Lexington, VA
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Steve
I had noticed that I was having no trouble adapting to using a Fuji camera with a mode dial. I suddenly remembered today that I have been using my X20 for quite a while now for the Day-to-Day challenge. It, of course, has a mode dial and an unmarked rear dial. Although it's not an issue, I do wonder why Fuji uses PSAM on the dial rather than PASM like everyone else.
 

drd1135

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Weather resistance is always a must have for my main camera. I'm in the same train of thought as you regarding the EVF. In my newly acquired X-T3, the EVF is flat out amazing. But that doesn't make me hate the EVF in the X-E3. It is still plenty usable. I find that it makes me appreciate the EVF in the X-T3 that much more when I use it. If you are narrowing down your kit and will only be shooting with one camera. I would go for the one with the better EVF.
That was my thinking with the XH1, but I wanted the smaller camera. I always have the A7Riii if I need WR. Actually, I wonder if any of my FE lenses are WR . . .

Edit: The 85 1.8
 
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drd1135

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Lexington, VA
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Steve
Unless, I'm mistaken, the Sony-branded, full-frame FE-mount lenses all have WR. But maybe not the old 50mm f/1.8. The Tamron f/2.8 zooms have WR. The Samyang primes do not.
I was just looking. The Samyang 14 and 85 mk2 are WR. The new Tamron primes are WR as well. The Tamron 35 2.8 had also gotten excellent reviews and is only $299. Still, Fuji has a nice set of WR primes as well.
 

drd1135

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Lexington, VA
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Steve
It's not gonna take much to convince me Bobby! I've been waiting for Fujifilm to put a proper grip on a camera, the XH1 was above my budget and too chunky, but this one might just do the trick.
8DA5DE63-58DC-49BB-BE4F-C4C4A32EAF40.jpeg

The grip is very good. You can easily hold the camera with a serious lens (16-80) using three fingers as shown above. I do use a wrist strap in practice but it's much easier to hold the camera with the weight on your fingers.
 
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