Fuji Fuji XP-90 waterproof camera images

Biro

Hall of Famer
Aug 7, 2011
Jersey Shore
Steve
I think everyone should have a waterproof camera
I agree. I have the Olympus TG-4... and it's great for what it is. I picked up a refurbished one from Olympus's own website during a 20 percent-off sale.

But for those who don't want to spend that much on a camera they plan to risk underwater, the Fujis are a good idea.

Check Amazon and eBay. If you can't find an XP-90 that's cheap enough... there are plenty of leftover and refurbed XP-80's and XP-70's. Some for under $100. I'd say that's low risk for those trying underwater photography for the first time.

Waterproof cameras are also a good idea for those who don't want to shoot underwater but don't want to risk high-end cameras on the beach or near the pool. Even if you never have the gaskets replaced (recommended every year by most camera makers), they're still splash and dust proof.
 
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Jock Elliott

Hall of Famer
Jan 3, 2012
Troy, NY
Lovely pictures, Dale. Could be a great camera for use when kayaking.

Amazon has it for $200 . . . and here's the really fun part: for an extra $40, you can get 4-year drops and spills protection!

I wonder, did somebody miss the point of this camera?:rofl:

Cheers, Jock
 
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dalethorn

Guest
XP90 first light . . .
View attachment 28417
View attachment 28418
View attachment 28419
View attachment 28420
Is it me or do these not look crisp at center of focus?
Cheers, Jock
Well, I wouldn't be inclined to judge the XP90 the same as a mid-priced Nikon or Leica, especially given the lack of manual control. Are you using spot focus?

Anyway, the first (white) flower is outstanding, as it's a subtle color and texture. The trees are also amazing, as most of the tiny inexpensive cameras smear foliage so badly. I'd need more examples to judge. Now to the second of your posts...
 
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dalethorn

Guest
I see in these that the Sony did much better, but I expected that for several reasons. One is that the XP90 ultimate image quality is on a par with an iPhone 6s-plus, even though the XP90 sensor is ostensibly bigger (1/2.3 inch). Did you try sharpening the XP90 flower slightly? And in the XP90 and Sony examples of the individual flower, could you back off on the Sony so the flower is the same size in the image? I wouldn't expect the XP90 'Macro' mode to be as good in lens handling as the Sony.
 

Jock Elliott

Hall of Famer
Jan 3, 2012
Troy, NY
I see in these that the Sony did much better, but I expected that for several reasons. One is that the XP90 ultimate image quality is on a par with an iPhone 6s-plus, even though the XP90 sensor is ostensibly bigger (1/2.3 inch). Did you try sharpening the XP90 flower slightly? And in the XP90 and Sony examples of the individual flower, could you back off on the Sony so the flower is the same size in the image? I wouldn't expect the XP90 'Macro' mode to be as good in lens handling as the Sony.
I ran three of the shots through Perfect Effects 8 sharpening:





Yes, I was using spot focusing.

Cheers, Jock
 
Aug 13, 2011
Sunny Frimley
Bill Palmer
I've just snagged one of these. A hundred and thirty quid Fuji refurb. with a full 12-month warranty. Haven't had a chance to try it yet. To be honest I am not expecting miracles for the price. I've bought it to sit in my shorts when on the beach; I'll probably take the battery out and store it with the holiday kit otherwise.

First impressions are that it is well thought out, well made and no better than it should be; it has a small sensor, slow lens, basic functions and controls - BUT I can wade out into the sea and not worry about dropping it in the drink.

(sea)horses for courses...
 
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dalethorn

Guest
Now these are 2 very difficult images. In the first, the brownish-green low-contrast areas of the trees and reflections on the water have a lot of smear, yet the overall appearance is good because the camera resolved just enough of the greener tree-leaves/foliage to make the foliage stand out with its characteristic form and shapes - better than the average cellphone anyway. In #2 the extreme light/dark contrast masks the problem areas effectively. I don't know how you planned these, but I could shoot these 50 times and be lucky to have one keeper. If I go back to the XP90 anytime soon, I might concentrate on doing some black and whites.

Edit: I think I'd try some different kinds of sharpening on #1, to make the better foliage stand out more.
 
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Jock Elliott

Hall of Famer
Jan 3, 2012
Troy, NY
Now these are 2 very difficult images. In the first, the brownish-green low-contrast areas of the trees and reflections on the water have a lot of smear, yet the overall appearance is good because the camera resolved just enough of the greener tree-leaves/foliage to make the foliage stand out with its characteristic form and shapes - better than the average cellphone anyway. In #2 the extreme light/dark contrast masks the problem areas effectively. I don't know how you planned these, but I could shoot these 50 times and be lucky to have one keeper. If I go back to the XP90 anytime soon, I might concentrate on doing some black and whites.

Edit: I think I'd try some different kinds of sharpening on #1, to make the better foliage stand out more.
The top one is a fairly serious crop.

Here's the original:


And here's the crop from it:


So far I am well pleased with this camera. It's smaller than all of my other cameras, flatter than the Sony RX100; I can wear it under my over-shirt, and it deploys almost instantly -- click the power button, and it's good to go.

As to planning . . . mostly, I don't. Generally I just carry a camera and shoot when I see something that moves me. Occasionally, I will travel to a hilltop when I think a great sunset or sunrise is in the offing.

Both this shot and the leaves lit by the sunlight happened when my wife and I were out strolling with the dogs.

Thanks for your comments . . . always useful.

Cheers, Jock
 
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dalethorn

Guest
The top one is a fairly serious crop.

Here's the original:
View attachment 28493

And here's the crop from it:

View attachment 28494
So far I am well pleased with this camera. It's smaller than all of my other cameras, flatter than the Sony RX100; I can wear it under my over-shirt, and it deploys almost instantly -- click the power button, and it's good to go. As to planning . . . mostly, I don't. Generally I just carry a camera and shoot when I see something that moves me. Occasionally, I will travel to a hilltop when I think a great sunset or sunrise is in the offing. Both this shot and the leaves lit by the sunlight happened when my wife and I were out strolling with the dogs. Thanks for your comments . . . always useful.
Cheers, Jock
All of a sudden I remember why this camera is so great - the original is excellent. BTW, could you have zoomed in to get the cropped perspective? The lens is good enough that you would get the best level of detail that way.
 

Jock Elliott

Hall of Famer
Jan 3, 2012
Troy, NY
All of a sudden I remember why this camera is so great - the original is excellent. BTW, could you have zoomed in to get the cropped perspective? The lens is good enough that you would get the best level of detail that way.
I probably could have zoomed to get the perspective, but the sun was behind me, which made viewing the screen to compose the shot very difficult.
 

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