Fuji Fun with Film Simulation 'Recipes'

bartjeej

Hall of Famer
I really enjoy the cooler colour palette of pretty much any film recipe or simulation that attempts to replicate Fujifilm, over the ine inevitably much warmer attempted Kodak replications.

I didn't shoot a lot of Kodak film, just a few rolls of Kodak Gold inbetween a truckload of Superia, which was just more prevalent here. But I can't remember the difference being so obvious. Was the difference really as big as the film replications make it look?
 
Location
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Name
Miguel Tejada-Flores
I really enjoy the cooler colour palette of pretty much any film recipe or simulation that attempts to replicate Fujifilm, over the ine inevitably much warmer attempted Kodak replications.

I didn't shoot a lot of Kodak film, just a few rolls of Kodak Gold inbetween a truckload of Superia, which was just more prevalent here. But I can't remember the difference being so obvious. Was the difference really as big as the film replications make it look?

I think actually in some ways the differences between films were very obvious - as much and even more so than the modern crop of simulations. Although, that said, there were, are and have been a wide, wide variety of different looks and tonalities among films. The palettes of a number of Kodachromes were rather different, one from another - and all differed from Ektachrome as well. Recently I've been looking at some photographers who worked extensively with different Kodacolor emulsions, which to my non-professional eye look much cooler than the more traditional or stereotypical Kodak reddish tones. Plus there were (and still are, though not used as much by film photographers) a number of motion picture film emulsions that were occasionally marketed for still photographers - with even more marked differences between them. (Though that was partially due obviously, for example, to some being balanced for different light temperatures than the daylight films.

And then you look at the Fuji analog films and I think (correct me if I'm wrong please) that many (most?) of the Superias tended to have much cooler (greener or bluer or both) balances than, say, Velvia, which occasionally looks like Kodachrome to me.

Short answer: I think the differences have always been rather significant.
But, you may have a point - in that certain simulations, whether in-camera jpegs, or post-processing looks or presets - do tend to exaggerate some differences. Or, at least, some of them do.
 

rayvonn

Hall of Famer
Location
London
I think actually in some ways the differences between films were very obvious - as much and even more so than the modern crop of simulations. Although, that said, there were, are and have been a wide, wide variety of different looks and tonalities among films. The palettes of a number of Kodachromes were rather different, one from another - and all differed from Ektachrome as well. Recently I've been looking at some photographers who worked extensively with different Kodacolor emulsions, which to my non-professional eye look much cooler than the more traditional or stereotypical Kodak reddish tones. Plus there were (and still are, though not used as much by film photographers) a number of motion picture film emulsions that were occasionally marketed for still photographers - with even more marked differences between them. (Though that was partially due obviously, for example, to some being balanced for different light temperatures than the daylight films.

And then you look at the Fuji analog films and I think (correct me if I'm wrong please) that many (most?) of the Superias tended to have much cooler (greener or bluer or both) balances than, say, Velvia, which occasionally looks like Kodachrome to me.

Short answer: I think the differences have always been rather significant.
But, you may have a point - in that certain simulations, whether in-camera jpegs, or post-processing looks or presets - do tend to exaggerate some differences. Or, at least, some of them do.
I always found Kodachrome presets to be a bit warm, nothing a slight nudge of the temperature slider can’t fix in PP.
 

Darmok N Jalad

There are FOUR LIGHTS!
Location
Tanagra
I had the X-T3 for a while and tried out the recipes. It was fun, but that WB issue did come up at times. I found a possible way to bring it back to default by jumping over to one of Fujis default sims, and then pick the next custom one. Otherwise, yeah, you’d get the wrong WB sometimes. Considering this is a major feature to having a Fuji, I’m honestly surprised they goofed this up.
 

Ghostbuggy

Regular
Location
Hoher Fläming, Germany
Name
Phill
Today I went out for a short stroll around the block. Autumn has long arrived here and days are mostly wet. So taking my Fujifilm kit was the logical choice. I always have a bunch of Film Recipes loaded and especially today I was rather pleased with the outcome of the sooc images. Those were only cropped and exported with Affinity Photo, no further editing done.

A lonely red leaf resting in the soft grass. Superia Xtra 400
52402999969_0d8c2678d9_o.jpg
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DSCF0473_AP by Kaltpfote, auf Flickr

A kilometer post sign of an abandoned railroad line was neatly framed by nature, the nice colored foliage would've been more pleasing with some evening sun - but that was blocked behind a thick layer of clouds. Superia Xtra 400
52403215718_238cae90e9_o.jpg
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The already mentioned railroad line, no need to worry, it is closed and abandoned. Only on very rare occasions some construction equipment is being stored on these tracks. Classic Negative, my own "Standard" settings.
52402204467_290fedc82c_o.jpg
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With autumn comes the mushroom season, here is a small example below a tree. Superia Xtra 400
52403159180_d0bc571737_o.jpg
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I quite like the Superia Xtra 400 recipe, it is a fairly good allrounder in many conditions. Of course one has to like the Classic Negative film simulation the recipe is based on.
 
Location
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Name
Miguel Tejada-Flores
Two more shots with the Stephen Shore-inspired Kodacolor recipe from Ritchie Roesch's FujiXWeekly website.
The first, an exterior shot on my rural street--

XT3_Oct19_22_motorcycle_mailbox.jpg
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The second, from inside my local Café (where Halloween-inspired redecoration is ongoing)--

XT3_Oct19_22_Calavera_mother+child.jpg
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Herbert Hound

Veteran
Location
The Welsh Borders
Name
Colin
Location
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Name
Miguel Tejada-Flores
Today I went out for a short stroll around the block. Autumn has long arrived here and days are mostly wet. So taking my Fujifilm kit was the logical choice. I always have a bunch of Film Recipes loaded and especially today I was rather pleased with the outcome of the sooc images. Those were only cropped and exported with Affinity Photo, no further editing done.

A lonely red leaf resting in the soft grass. Superia Xtra 400
View attachment 340061DSCF0473_AP by Kaltpfote, auf Flickr

A kilometer post sign of an abandoned railroad line was neatly framed by nature, the nice colored foliage would've been more pleasing with some evening sun - but that was blocked behind a thick layer of clouds. Superia Xtra 400
View attachment 340062DSCF0505_AP by Kaltpfote, auf Flickr

The already mentioned railroad line, no need to worry, it is closed and abandoned. Only on very rare occasions some construction equipment is being stored on these tracks. Classic Negative, my own "Standard" settings.
View attachment 340063DSCF0512_AP by Kaltpfote, auf Flickr

With autumn comes the mushroom season, here is a small example below a tree. Superia Xtra 400
View attachment 340064DSCF0519_AP by Kaltpfote, auf Flickr

I quite like the Superia Xtra 400 recipe, it is a fairly good allrounder in many conditions. Of course one has to like the Classic Negative film simulation the recipe is based on.

These are really, really nice, Phil.
And I totally agree with you on the Superia Xtra 400 recipe. It is both pleasing and versatile.
 
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