Fuji Fun with Film Simulation 'Recipes'

Two different recipes with totally different looks of the same subject.
The first, the FujiXWeekly Kodak Gold 200 (which Ritchie Roesch recently 'tweaked' to come up with a version for the X-Trans V sensor in my X-T5, which renders blues in a different way from earlier X-Trans sensors)--

XT5_Nov24_23_Stanley_at_Coffee_Shop(kodak.gold.200).jpg
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The second using Luis Costa's "Colored BNW" recipe which is among my favorite Fuji monochrome 'looks'--

XT5_Nov24_23_Stanley_drinking_coffee(colored.bnw.sooc).jpg
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Minor processing note: the colour photo was adjusted slightly for contrast and an s-curve; but the black & white one is, literally, an SOOC with zero tweaking or adjustments... exactly as the camera rendered the jpeg image when I pressed the shutter.
 
Two shots of the same subject, each with a different 'recipe', both from Ritchie Roesch's Fuji-X-Weekly library.
The first is an interesting new one, his newest iteration of Kodak Vision3 250D (this one tweaked for X-Trans V sensors, and based on Nostalgic Neg, using a Fluorescent white balance, but with a surprising overall tonality)--

XT5_Dec21_23_Pee-Wee_Christmas_ornament#1(KodakV3250Dv2).jpg
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The second is the Kodak 1976 recipe which, according to Ritchie, began life as his attempt to replicate some of the colors of Joel Meyerowitz's work.

XT5_Dec21_23_Pee-Wee_Christmas_ornament#2(Kodak1976).jpg
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I rather like them both.
 
Trying out a few different X-Trans II sensor profiles on my newly acquired X-E2. All from Ritchie Roesch's FujiXWeekly website. (With embedded links to the recipe's pages.)
First is what may be my new favorite XTransII recipe, Classic Kodak Chrome --

XE2_Jan24_24_gate_hinge#1(C1-Classic.Kodak.Chrome).jpg
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Then Ritchie's Kodacolor recipe--

XE2_Jan24_24_gate_hinge#2(C3-Kodacolor).jpg
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Next the black & white recipe for Monochrome Red --

XE2_Jan24_24_gate_hinge#3(C4-Monochrome.Red).jpg
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And finally an attempt to modify the recipe for Fujicolor Superia 800 - designed for X-Trans III sensors, so it doesn't quite 'work' for the X-E2 the same way that it did for my old X-T3 --

XE2_Jan24_24_gate_hinge#4(C7-Superia.800).jpg
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I suspect I'll be diving down the rabbit hole of X-Trans II sensor recipes more in the not-too-distant future... :coco:
 
Trying out a few different X-Trans II sensor profiles on my newly acquired X-E2. All from Ritchie Roesch's FujiXWeekly website. (With embedded links to the recipe's pages.)
First is what may be my new favorite XTransII recipe, Classic Kodak Chrome --

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Then Ritchie's Kodacolor recipe--

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Next the black & white recipe for Monochrome Red --

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And finally an attempt to modify the recipe for Fujicolor Superia 800 - designed for X-Trans III sensors, so it doesn't quite 'work' for the X-E2 the same way that it did for my old X-T3 --

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I suspect I'll be diving down the rabbit hole of X-Trans II sensor recipes more in the not-too-distant future... :coco:
Miguel you are an invaluable asset to this forum.
 
Trying out a new simulaton 'recipe' recently published by Ritchie Roesch on the Fuji X Weekly website, which he calls "1971 Kodak". It is formulated for X-Trans V sensors (which includes my X-T5). Ritchie says it was initially inspired by a number of old color prints in an photo album his grandmother had made; he believes many of them had been shot with a Kodak Instamatic camera, loaded with Kodacolor-X negative film. His recipe features a warmish tone, subdued colors and a decent amount of contrast.

XT5_Feb12_25_Valentine's_Day_Calavera.jpg
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So far, I'm liking this recipe... a lot.
 
Comparing three interesting recipes from the Fuji-X website.
First, 1976 Kodak--

XT5_Feb24_24_fish_in_jar#1(1976.Kodak).jpg
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Next, Kodak Ultramax 400--

XT5_Feb24_24_fish_in_jar#2(Kodak.Ultramax.400).jpg
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And last, the recipe for the motion picture film stock, Kodak Vision3 250K v2--

XT5_Feb24_24_fish_in_jar#3(K.Vision3.250D.v2).jpg
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All of these are the newer tweaks, designed for the X-Trans V sensor... which is one of the (big) reasons why I was motivated to sell my otherwise superb X-T3 and 'upgrade' it to an X-T5 (the more versatile sensor).
 
One of the downsides of having recently downgraded my Fujifilm stable, from the significantly larger (but still quite wonderful) X-Pro3 (with its X-Trans IV sensor) to the physically smaller X-T3 (with its slightly older X-Trans III sensor) - is that I no longer have access to what used to be my favorite Fuji Film Simulation, 'Classic Negative', which was only introduced on a handful of (relatively) newer X-Trans IV equipped camera bodies.

So I'm currently embarked on what may be an entertainingly labyrinthine quest to find an X-Trans III simulation 'recipe' that will allow me to get some of the satisfying jpeg color tones and palettes that made me a Fuji fan in the first place. Am sharing a few initial results with fellow Fujiholics who may be at least intrigued by the possibilities. Here is a series of shots taken this morning, of an ancient Olivetti portable typewriter that's been in my family a few generations now - each shot taken with a different 'recipe'.

First, Ritchie Roesch's 'Superia 800' recipe (from his Fuji-X Weekly website).

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Next, a homegrown general purpose colour recipe developed by the Portuguese photographer Luis Costa. This one is growing on me.

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Then another Superia recipe - this one for 'Superia 100', developed by the Czech photographer Piotr Skrzypek, a little more contrasty with less shadow details than the previous Superia, but interesting nonetheless.

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Then another recipe from Ritchie Roesch's website, this one his attempt to recreate the feeling of the Kodak motion picture negative film stock, Vision3 250D. I can't say exactly why, but it intrigues me quite a bit.

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Then one more of Ritchie Roesch's recipes, this one a variation on one of my X-T3's default internal simulations, 'Eterna'. Real Eterna was originally a motion picture film and Fujifilm created this simulation initially for videographers, but Ritchie's reinterpretation of it has, to my eyes at least, a more contrasty and analog feel to it. (It's also growing on me.)

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Finally, just to mix things up, a monochrome recipe. My X-T3 has the excellent default Acros sim (based on Fuji's legendary high-contrast black & white film), which allows the additional implementation of colored filter effects; but there is also a whole host of interesting 3rd party monochrome 'recipes'. This one, too, comes from the Fuji-X weekly website, it's called 'Analog Monochrome'.

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I'm guardedly optimistic that I may not miss the XPro's Classic Neg simulation quite as much as I was afraid I might.
Awesome! Very good examples of what can be achieved with recipes applied on fuji film Sims.
Congratulations and thanks
 
Using the modified (for X-Trans V sensors, which my X-T5 has) Cinestill 800T recipe from FujiXWeekly. Cinestill 800T was originally a Tungsten-based motion picture film - and is particularly neat when shooting dark images, late at night, with varieties of tungsten or fluorescent lighting.

XT5_June9_24_driving_on_bookcase(cinestill.800t).jpg
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