GAS GAS: Please Share your Latest Acquisitions Big and Small

A small Godox flash, the Retro Lux Junior. It features manual settings for output 1/1...1/64 and also an Auto setting. Can be synched to another flash on its first or second flash. A cord for sync, enabling off-camera use as well. I instantly would fire the moron who designed the Auto circuit. It either produces very low light output or a blast, but nothing in between near a sensible exposure; read that in some reviews as well, so wasn't hoping for anything useable here. Manual flash output works well, once you figured out how to read the scales. It wasn't expensive, and rightly so. I think I'm going to keep it.

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It's a cool-looking flash! Do you know if the auto mode requires certain camera settings to work properly? I know that the Olympus FL-14 has a peculiar auto mode which reads back the amount of light produced by the flash and then cuts the flash duration... but it only works at set distances with set apertures: it has a chart associated with it to know what aperture to set for a particular distance.
 
It's a cool-looking flash! Do you know if the auto mode requires certain camera settings to work properly? I know that the Olympus FL-14 has a peculiar auto mode which reads back the amount of light produced by the flash and then cuts the flash duration... but it only works at set distances with set apertures: it has a chart associated with it to know what aperture to set for a particular distance.
Yes, it's a nice little flash. The Auto setting is indeed supposed to be the ancient type where a sensor on the flash reads the output and cuts off the current through the flash bulb once the exposure is correct. Too bad it doesn't work correctly. At shorter distances (somewhere below 2 m) it outputs a tiny amount of light, think enough for f/2 at ISO 3200, ridiculous. Further out it seems to deliver a reasonable output and there's no smooth crossover as far as I can tell. So I think it's workable when you set the manual output to something that will not overexpose and pull up exposure in post. With a leaf-shutter camera like the Fuji X100's or Leica Q's it easily should be able to overpower direct sunlight.
 
Yes, it's a nice little flash. The Auto setting is indeed supposed to be the ancient type where a sensor on the flash reads the output and cuts off the current through the flash bulb once the exposure is correct. Too bad it doesn't work correctly. At shorter distances (somewhere below 2 m) it outputs a tiny amount of light, think enough for f/2 at ISO 3200, ridiculous. Further out it seems to deliver a reasonable output and there's no smooth crossover as far as I can tell. So I think it's workable when you set the manual output to something that will not overexpose and pull up exposure in post. With a leaf-shutter camera like the Fuji X100's or Leica Q's it easily should be able to overpower direct sunlight.
I had a read of the manual linked from the B&H website. It appears that the auto mode only works with a single aperture for each ISO (f/2 at ISO 50, f/2.8 at ISO 100, f/4 at ISO 200 etc.) with a max distance of 4 m. So you cannot, for example, set it to f/4 at ISO 100 and expect it to provide the correct amount of light. Definitely a rather simple algorithm!
 
A small Godox flash, the Retro Lux Junior. It features manual settings for output 1/1...1/64 and also an Auto setting. Can be synched to another flash on its first or second flash. A cord for sync, enabling off-camera use as well. I instantly would fire the moron who designed the Auto circuit. It either produces very low light output or a blast, but nothing in between near a sensible exposure; read that in some reviews as well, so wasn't hoping for anything useable here. Manual flash output works well, once you figured out how to read the scales. It wasn't expensive, and rightly so. I think I'm going to keep it.

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Same idiot who designed the flash in my phone!
 
Starting down the retirement road with what's known as a trailing retirement. (retain access to email and servers and may attend a conference)

So I bought myself a retirement present:
Voigtlander 28mm f/1.5 Nokton Asph Type II, used from Stephen Gandy.
If it makes it here on time it might be my SIA lens.
Congratulations on retirement! I am only a few years behind you. I also bought mine used from CameraQuest. I really like it, wonderful lens.
 
Starting down the retirement road with what's known as a trailing retirement. (retain access to email and servers and may attend a conference)

So I bought myself a retirement present:
Voigtlander 28mm f/1.5 Nokton Asph Type II, used from Stephen Gandy.
If it makes it here on time it might be my SIA lens.
Congrats on the retirement, Don! Be sure to tell all your friends how much you love Leica gear as you go through this transition!
 
I had a read of the manual linked from the B&H website. It appears that the auto mode only works with a single aperture for each ISO (f/2 at ISO 50, f/2.8 at ISO 100, f/4 at ISO 200 etc.) with a max distance of 4 m. So you cannot, for example, set it to f/4 at ISO 100 and expect it to provide the correct amount of light. Definitely a rather simple algorithm!
I read that too. I have experimented extensively with f/2.8 at ISO 100 and it just doesn't work. At shorter distances the picture is almost completely dark with these settings. I tried if any of the other settings (manual output, S1/off/S2) made any difference, they didn't.

Edit: meanwhile, on the Sony A7R4 the flash's Auto mode works as expected. It looks like the Leica Q3's shutter is just a bit too slow relative to the flash in Auto mode to catch the first bit of light (which is all there is if you're going close). Same problem in manual with 1/64 power, which is also a very short burst. Maybe the moron is a Leica employee...
 
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A Sony 20mm f2.8 E lens for my A7CR. B&H had a very slightly used one for $275 and I would say that is a bargain. On a FF camera it has a roughly 30mm FOV. Combine that with the size (it is definitely a pancake) and you have an excellent, compact carry. I will use it with the Sigma 90/2.8.

I also had a Leica 6 bit template printed up by a company called Print a Thing. I downloaded the .STL file from a person who made it available. The cost to make these was extremely reasonable and I had the template in less than a week. I was using a cardboard template that I got from a FM member but I was concerned about the long term viability of it so I took a gamble on this and I am glad I did.

Finally, I ordered a few 43mm screw on vented hood for the Voigtlander 28/1.5 and 50/1.5 which more or less eliminates the need for a cap. An added plus is they hide the chrome rings of these lenses. They are no name thin ones from Amazon.
 
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I picked up a Tap and Dye Classic (5/8" wide) leather strap in a 30" length. I don't wear shoulder straps on my neck, shoulder or cross shoulder but just with a wrap or two around my wrist or fore arm. I do often throw it around my neck for a lens change and the length works well for that. The Horween Chromexcel leather is rich and supple and Justin over at Tap and Dye is great to work with.
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64gb RAM for my iMac and the Thunderbolt NVME housing I should have bought when I got the 4TB NVME to put my photos on.

The RAM upgrade is not for the faint hearted since it involves cutting the screen away. Made a mistake of sticking it back on before testing. Had to disassemble/reassemble because the machine wouldn't boot - turned out that although the RAM clips had snapped into place, the modules weren't seated properly.
 
64gb RAM for my iMac and the Thunderbolt NVME housing I should have bought when I got the 4TB NVME to put my photos on.

The RAM upgrade is not for the faint hearted since it involves cutting the screen away. Made a mistake of sticking it back on before testing. Had to disassemble/reassemble because the machine wouldn't boot - turned out that although the RAM clips had snapped into place, the modules weren't seated properly.
Well done, Richard.

You can never have too much RAM, or too much hard disk space. I hope you have a nice reliable spinner or two, just in case your nice new NVME.2 drives decide not to play.
 
Thanks John. I obsessively back things up and have about 10 external HDDs and counting. 64GB of RAM was a £1000 Apple upgrade when you could still order these Macs new in 2022.

As resolutions get higher and RAW files get bigger, a fast drive for your photo catalogue is pretty much a necessity for lightroom. I bought the iMac secondhand two years ago at a bargain price. Turns out that it had the option of a Fusion drive (small SSD plus an HDD) or SSD. This one was supplied off the shelf with a 512GB SSD.

However, it turns out that the logic board is the same as in the Fusion version, so when I got it apart, there is an empty HDD caddy in the case and an empty SATA connector and power connector. the 'Fusion' drive is actually a small-ish SSD AND an HDD.

I'll need to research it, but I think I can add a 2.5" SSD or HDD in there as well :)
 
One other thing - I have recently had a few issues with the fans racing. The back of the case was frequently hot to the touch.

On disassembly, the fan blades and processor cooling fins were thick with dust/dirt. One side was around 50% occluded and therefore not working.

I was tempted to renew the thermal paste, but because the processor is not attached to the board (it's held in place with the heatsink), I read that it's easy to bend the pins if you don't know what you are doing because the bolts are on one side of the board and the processor and heatsink are wobbling around on the reverse as you tighten things back up. I'm going to see how things go.

At the bottom of the Mac casing there are air vents running the length of the case. I Hoovered these periodically, so they were nice and clean. However, inside the case, an inch above the vents is a black plastic strip full of little holes running the whole width of the computer. Those holes were 3/4 blocked with dirt.

Having sucked all the dirt out with a Hoover equipped with a silicone straw, everything's now a lot cooler.
 
One other thing - I have recently had a few issues with the fans racing. The back of the case was frequently hot to the touch.

On disassembly, the fan blades and processor cooling fins were thick with dust/dirt. One side was around 50% occluded and therefore not working.
That always helps, IME.
I was tempted to renew the thermal paste, but because the processor is not attached to the board (it's held in place with the heatsink), I read that it's easy to bend the pins if you don't know what you are doing because the bolts are on one side of the board and the processor and heatsink are wobbling around on the reverse as you tighten things back up. I'm going to see how things go.
Again, IME, while the paste might be hard and nasty, it still works (with Intel CPUs and heatsinks, at least). While I have a nice big syringe of heatsink paste, I've only ever used about 1/10th of a thimble full of it, in about 20 years. A common mistake is to use far too much. It should not squeeze out the sides!

By the sound of yours, I wouldn't interfere unless the CPU is overheating.
At the bottom of the Mac casing there are air vents running the length of the case. I Hoovered these periodically, so they were nice and clean. However, inside the case, an inch above the vents is a black plastic strip full of little holes running the whole width of the computer. Those holes were 3/4 blocked with dirt.
Good work. There are some of those in some of my PCs PSU air vents. Cleaning them every few years is a bit of a PITA, but they do help to keep the PSU fans running cleaner. I need to pull the PSU out of Heather's PC at some stage. It's making nasty noises on occasion, like a dry bearing.
Having sucked all the dirt out with a Hoover equipped with a silicone straw, everything's now a lot cooler.
Good to hear, mate.
 
A Sony 20mm f2.8 E lens for my A7CR. B&H had a very slightly used one for $275 and I would say that is a bargain. On a FF camera it has a roughly 30mm FOV. Combine that with the size (it is definitely a pancake) and you have an excellent, compact carry. I will use it with the Sigma 90/2.8.
Totally agree. I think it's the smallest lens available for Sony E-mount (APS-C), ideal for street photography. I rebought it after the first sample's focusing mechanism broke, I now mainly use it for infrared photography on a full-spectrum A3000.
 
I need to pull the PSU out of Heather's PC at some stage. It's making nasty noises on occasion, like a dry bearing.

What kind of noise John?

I had an issue with my very first PC (2GB HDD / 16MB RAM / WIN 98).

Switched it on and within a few minutes, it was making a noise like a flashgun charging. It got louder.....and louder.....then.........BOOM. A spectacular flash followed by some smoke (I recall running away).

Power supply. I was told by the shop that when they blow they often take the drives with them.

So, as long as it's not THAT kind of noise.
 
What kind of noise John?

I had an issue with my very first PC (2GB HDD / 16MB RAM / WIN 98).

Switched it on and within a few minutes, it was making a noise like a flashgun charging. It got louder.....and louder.....then.........BOOM. A spectacular flash followed by some smoke (I recall running away).

Power supply. I was told by the shop that when they blow they often take the drives with them.

So, as long as it's not THAT kind of noise.
It depends on the noise indeed. If it's a very high pitch constant noise when the PC is on it could be coil whine coming from some GPUs. If it's the way you describe it Richard it could be capacitors inside a PSU or on the motherboard but those kind of issues are not as common as back in the 80s and 90s as capacitor technology has come leaps and bounds and incredibly cheap these days (unless it's very cheap Chinese and no name brands).
If it's a loud wiring sound it's probably a fan's ball barring getting dry and grinding the plastic casing as it spins. But it's still the easiest problem to solve, just replace the fan (don't bother fixing it, they are cheap enough to just replace them and not have the risk of breaking and flinging plastic blades around the case when it crashes into its frame).
If it's loud clicking noise it could be a dying hard drive (if you have the old disk spinning hard drives). It would need to backed up (if you have valuable info on it) immediately and replace. Don't postpone it if you can, that's how I lost all my images from 2008 to half of 2013 (I couldn't afford another hard drive and it eventually died with all my pictures).
 
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