GAS: Please Share your Latest Acquisitions Big and Small

Apr 18, 2014
Boston Burbs
David
..... I might be headed back to Canon, but no good forum home now for gear-talk :(
If it’s gear talk you want, dpreview forums are great for that, including the frequent my gear is better than yours. Lol

But check out Fred Miranda or POTN which have strong Canon specific areas.
Interesting, on a quick search there really doesn't seem to be Canon specific forums as there are for others. There were more for Pentax on page one of a google search than for Canon. Are the big forums (DPR, FM, etc) Canon centric so enough so Canon forums just never come to be? I've never been a Canon shooter (other than a few early P&S).

Maybe FB? I'm a member of several Olympus and Fuji groups.
 
Dec 31, 2013
Louisville, Ky
Interesting, on a quick search there really doesn't seem to be Canon specific forums as there are for others. There were more for Pentax on page one of a google search than for Canon. Are the big forums (DPR, FM, etc) Canon centric so enough so Canon forums just never come to be? I've never been a Canon shooter (other than a few early P&S).

Maybe FB? I'm a member of several Olympus and Fuji groups.
In the old days, POTN was an all Canon forum. It slowly started adding other brands. It is radically different these days. Which isn't a bad thing.
 

ErichH

Regular
Jun 11, 2020
Centon K100 w/MC Centon f:1.7/50 mm

One of my friends obviously thinks that I don't have enough cameras, so he gifted me this Chinese SLR with PK mount.

FV5_0362-01.jpeg


FV5_0363-01.jpeg


FV5_0364-01.jpeg


Centon K100 is a design based on the Cosina CT-1 chassis. The CT-1 chassis was used for many budget cameras, so the K100 has similarities to many other models as well as some shared parts.

Battery powers the exposure meter and controls the shutter speeds. Pressing the shutter button half way down powers the exposure meter. Camera operates only at 1/60s without batteries. When camera is not in use, the main switch on the Shutter Speed Dial is set to "Off".

Released: Late 1990's
Lens mount: Pentax K bayonet
Shutter: Vertical Running Metal Focal Plane Shutter
Shutter Speed: B, 1s - 1/1000s
Flash Synch Speed: 1/60s
Exposure Indicator: Match LED
ISO Range: 25 - 1600
Viewfinder Type: Pentaprism
Viewing magnification: 0.91X, 92% FOV
Meter Pattern: Centerweighted Average
Meter Range/EV Range: 2 - 19
Battery: Two LR44, SR44, or equivalent
Body Dimensions: W 136 mm x H 87 mm x D 54 mm
Weight: 434 g (body only, without batteries)

Notes

Other models based on the Cosina CT-1 chassis include the Kenko/Tokina KF-4PK, Phenix DN60, Yashica FX-3, Nikon FM-10 and FE-10, Canon T60, Ricoh KR-5 Super II, Carena CX-300, Chinon CM-7, Hanimex DR-1 Super, and the Olympus OM2000.

Centon was the house brand of the UK camera store Jessops, for cameras and accessories including lenses, flash equipment and power winders.

Centon cameras are either re-badged or are clones of older Japanese models - perhaps using the original tooling - but some in newer materials. At least some were made in China.

The trademark 'Centon' was registered with the US Patent & Trademark Office, serial no. 75559845 on 28 September 1998 by Jessop Group Limited of Leicester, UK, and registered with reg. no. 2833465, and was cancelled on 26 November 2010.
 

gryphon1911

All-Pro
Feb 6, 2015
Central Ohio, USA
Andrew
With the humidity and heat spiking to Ohios usual intolerable levels, daily hikes require adequate hydration. I don’t always need to bring a full backpack and I hate constantly having something in my hands. Gets in the way of grabbing the camera when need be!!

So picked this hydration pack up for $39USD.

used it three times so far and it has been great!
2625E199-B966-46FE-AF65-7190636E6202.jpeg
A785BAB3-C197-40C5-AF69-8C442F6F574A.jpeg
 

christilou

Legend
Jul 13, 2010
Sunny Frimley
I traded some stuff for a used Sony RX1R II ....... the trouble was that although it was sold in "as new" condition, the seller failed to tell me that it had no box, charger, manual, strap etc. although there was nothing wrong with the camera itself. I decided to return it and managed to find a brand new one for a very good price and now I'm a happy camper :)
 

wt21

Hall of Famer
Aug 15, 2010
I traded some stuff for a used Sony RX1R II ....... the trouble was that although it was sold in "as new" condition, the seller failed to tell me that it had no box, charger, manual, strap etc. although there was nothing wrong with the camera itself. I decided to return it and managed to find a brand new one for a very good price and now I'm a happy camper :)
that’s a dream camera of mine if I could get over my irrational fear/dislike to fixed lenses. But it looks so fun!
 

ggweci

Veteran
Feb 2, 2013
Toronto, Canada
Craig
@christilou great pickup, and I’m sure you’ll make many great images with it, as you do with all your gear.

I had one for a short while and loved the IQ and compact package. The pop up EVF is a neat feature and the large resolution sensor provides good cropping ability for the fixed lens.

I did hate the battery life though. Yes, they are very small to carry, but also the reason why they don’t last long. I felt I always had to have one at the ready and disliked charging management and tracking which batteries were dead. If not for that, I’d probably still have it.
 

Jonathan F/2

Top Veteran
Aug 21, 2011
Los Angeles, USA
With the humidity and heat spiking to Ohios usual intolerable levels, daily hikes require adequate hydration. I don’t always need to bring a full backpack and I hate constantly having something in my hands. Gets in the way of grabbing the camera when need be!!

So picked this hydration pack up for $39USD.

used it three times so far and it has been great!
View attachment 228285View attachment 228284
Nice! I have the exact same hydration pack in black and it works great on hikes. It also has enough pockets for small items without feeling like you're carrying a big backpack. On a side note I leave my water pouch in the fridge to keep from getting moldy, but it seems replacement water pouches are fairly affordable.
 

gryphon1911

All-Pro
Feb 6, 2015
Central Ohio, USA
Andrew
Nice! I have the exact same hydration pack in black and it works great on hikes. It also has enough pockets for small items without feeling like you're carrying a big backpack. On a side note I leave my water pouch in the fridge to keep from getting moldy, but it seems replacement water pouches are fairly affordable.
I clean mine regularly, so have not had any issues with moldy pouches, thankfully.
ON today's hike, I took the Fuji XPRO2 and realized that in the bottom pouch, I could fit the 50-230/4.5-6.7 in the bottom pouch with ease...so is a lot more versatile than first thought.

ON very hot days, I throw some ice into the weather pouch as well.
 

Jonathan F/2

Top Veteran
Aug 21, 2011
Los Angeles, USA
I clean mine regularly, so have not had any issues with moldy pouches, thankfully.
ON today's hike, I took the Fuji XPRO2 and realized that in the bottom pouch, I could fit the 50-230/4.5-6.7 in the bottom pouch with ease...so is a lot more versatile than first thought.

ON very hot days, I throw some ice into the weather pouch as well.
Same here, I throw ice in to keep the water cool. Though I notice it tends to heat up especially when worn on your back, so the ice really helps! Yeah I also clean the pouch, but I still keep it in the fridge when not in use, just in case I missed any crevices. I watched several Youtube videos on hydration pack maintenance! :D
 

gryphon1911

All-Pro
Feb 6, 2015
Central Ohio, USA
Andrew
Same here, I throw ice in to keep the water cool. Though I notice it tends to heat up especially when worn on your back, so the ice really helps! Yeah I also clean the pouch, but I still keep it in the fridge when not in use, just in case I missed any crevices. I watched several Youtube videos on hydration pack maintenance! :D
I might start doing that. Thanks for the tip.
 

MoonMind

Hall of Famer
Dec 29, 2013
Switzerland
Matt
A little update on my latest acquisitions:

The Fujifilm 90mm f/2 is a fantastic lens; and though it's big and bulky, it balances much better on the camera than I thought it would. As to downsides, it's clearly too big to fit into the main compartment of my small camera sling, but it fits into the top pocket, limiting what I can take with me alongside the gear, but usually, I should be fine (during summer ...).

The Fujifilm 35mm f/1.4 is an interesting beast. It's capable of wonderful images - I knew that going in, but it's already delivered. Handling-wise, it's bigger than I expected, but it's no burden at all. But it's an unruly lens when it comes to mechanical operation - the AF is loud and not that sure of itself, and depending on lighting and aperture setting, you get rattle-snaking (quick opening and closing of aperture blades, very audible) as well. In use, these things take a back seat - but when I first tried the lens, I was really reminded of the Panasonic 20mm f/1.7 in so many ways, and not that positively ... Interestingly, the 27mm f/2.8, while *sounding* similar when it comes to AF (and also changes its length while focusing), doesn't exhibit that kind of behaviour - but that may be because it doesn't allow for direct aperture control.

Crucially, while I was silently hoping the 35mm f/1.4 might replace the Sigma 30mm f/1.4 C in my kit, I'm not so sure it will - that lens operates so much smoother and quicker, even on the ancient (by modern standards) A6000. And it delivers - though I'd say that stopped down, the Fuji 35mm f/1.4 at the very least matches the Sigma, and wide open, it exhibits much more character, a unique signature that the more analytical Sigma can't provide. However, I use the Sigma a lot for reportage style work - and for that, it's close to ideal (again, even on such a dated body ...). I really don't want to restart thinking about an A6400 ... Though until the current situation changes, I won't need a crowd-worthy small camera anyway.

As it is, the two lenses complement my Fuji kit in a very sound and satisfying way, IQ is there, and in use, I'm happy with both. However, it's too early to tell if I can get out of Sony APS-C - which is ironic, because I hardly have any dedicated gear; if only the 30mm f/1.4 C wasn't such a nice lens ... Now, if Sigma could just make up their mind and finally release their APS-C DN primes for Fuji X ... I'd have the Sony E mount converted to Fuji X and be done.

M.
 

rayvonn

Hall of Famer
Jan 19, 2015
A little update on my latest acquisitions:

The Fujifilm 90mm f/2 is a fantastic lens; and though it's big and bulky, it balances much better on the camera than I thought it would. As to downsides, it's clearly too big to fit into the main compartment of my small camera sling, but it fits into the top pocket, limiting what I can take with me alongside the gear, but usually, I should be fine (during summer ...).

The Fujifilm 35mm f/1.4 is an interesting beast. It's capable of wonderful images - I knew that going in, but it's already delivered. Handling-wise, it's bigger than I expected, but it's no burden at all. But it's an unruly lens when it comes to mechanical operation - the AF is loud and not that sure of itself, and depending on lighting and aperture setting, you get rattle-snaking (quick opening and closing of aperture blades, very audible) as well. In use, these things take a back seat - but when I first tried the lens, I was really reminded of the Panasonic 20mm f/1.7 in so many ways, and not that positively ... Interestingly, the 27mm f/2.8, while *sounding* similar when it comes to AF (and also changes its length while focusing), doesn't exhibit that kind of behaviour - but that may be because it doesn't allow for direct aperture control.

Crucially, while I was silently hoping the 35mm f/1.4 might replace the Sigma 30mm f/1.4 C in my kit, I'm not so sure it will - that lens operates so much smoother and quicker, even on the ancient (by modern standards) A6000. And it delivers - though I'd say that stopped down, the Fuji 35mm f/1.4 at the very least matches the Sigma, and wide open, it exhibits much more character, a unique signature that the more analytical Sigma can't provide. However, I use the Sigma a lot for reportage style work - and for that, it's close to ideal (again, even on such a dated body ...). I really don't want to restart thinking about an A6400 ... Though until the current situation changes, I won't need a crowd-worthy small camera anyway.

As it is, the two lenses complement my Fuji kit in a very sound and satisfying way, IQ is there, and in use, I'm happy with both. However, it's too early to tell if I can get out of Sony APS-C - which is ironic, because I hardly have any dedicated gear; if only the 30mm f/1.4 C wasn't such a nice lens ... Now, if Sigma could just make up their mind and finally release their APS-C DN primes for Fuji X ... I'd have the Sony E mount converted to Fuji X and be done.

M.
Never did get the 90mm but I always used to wonder how it compared to the Oly 75, any thoughts on that Matt?
 

MoonMind

Hall of Famer
Dec 29, 2013
Switzerland
Matt
Never did get the 90mm but I always used to wonder how it compared to the Oly 75, any thoughts on that Matt?
Sorry, I've never shot with the 75mm f/1.8 for any length of time (I've handled it - but that was a few years ago). However, I know people who have and were/are simply delighted. The lens is of course smaller and lighter than the 90mm f/2, but the latter has weather sealing (not that I had the body to match it, mind), and I feel a 150mm-e would most probably be too tight for me (the 135mm-e is a bit tighter than what I seem to pre-visualise, but by a negligible amount; I'll get used to it quickly).

Another thought: I don't really like the size of the 12-40mm f/2.8 on the E-M5 III, and the 75mm f/1.8's is almost the same, so ... On the other hand, its weight is just a tad above the 12-45mm's - which is a great lens in use*; though also more compact, which may be important. The 12-40mm f/2.8 always feels nose-heavy - not only because of its weight, but also because of the way it's balanced internally; lots of weight to the front, it appears ...**

Anyhow, if you want to stick with :mu43:, the 75mm is a no-brainer because it's such a great performer; noone I know of disagrees. For me, though, :mu43: is strictly the *compact* system, and I own and love the Sigma 60mm f/2.8 - in spite of its seemingly frugal specs and low price, it's a fantastic lens, and the best cure against lusting after the 75mm IMO. :mu43: means - to me - that I can cover everything up to 600mm-e with comparatively little bulk (the whole system fits into one medium-sized backpack!). The Fujifilm stuff is more about quality and results, a field where, in spite of all of its merits, :mu43: has its limitations. The 90mm f/2 fits that purpose perfectly - all the more since it's far less uncomfortable in use than I feared it might be (see **). That's also a testament to the clever design of the X-E3 - it's really small, but handles well with bigger lenses (better than the already nice GX9; the jury's still out as to how it compares to the E-M5 III***).

(I went OT a couple of times; I've put that stuff into footnotes to unclutter things; I hope it works.)

M.

*OT: Tthe 12-45mm f/4 is by far the best match to the smaller (and lighter) E-M5 III body. I kept the 12-40mm for low-light reportage, something it excels at - but the 12-45mm lives on the E-M5 III now (sometimes, the Sigma 30mm f/1.4 (:mu43:!) and 60mm f/2.8 get some use). And just to repeat that (I said it before): The 12-45mm f/4 *beats* the 18-55mm f/2.8-4 - in all respects, range, optics, ease of use ... and that's a fantastic achievement, as everyone who has handled the Fuji zoom will understand ...
**OT (slightly): It was a real eye-opener to handle the 12-100mm f/4 which, while a lot bigger and heavier, feels actually better balanced and less of a burden (that was on the E-M10, no less - though with the additional grip). The 90mm f/2 reminds me a lot of that!
***OT: I'm contemplating getting the grip for the E-M5 III because of all this - but may not even need the one I already ordered for the X-E3. I'll keep it anyway - all additional grips I own (several!) sometimes come in handy. Though I have to say it here and now: The worst(!) additional grip is the Leica one for the M10. I know what they thought - but the benefits are minor, and the downsides are considerable. The best additional grip I've ever seen and owned, on the other hand, was the one for the Olympus E-M10 ... the only camera I ever really regretted selling; it was such a well thought-out product. Yes, the GX9 and of course the E-M5 III take (slightly) better pictures and offer more, but the E-M10 was no slouch and handled like a dream when "gripped".
 

rayvonn

Hall of Famer
Jan 19, 2015
Sorry, I've never shot with the 75mm f/1.8 for any length of time (I've handled it - but that was a few years ago). However, I know people who have and were/are simply delighted. The lens is of course smaller and lighter than the 90mm f/2, but the latter has weather sealing (not that I had the body to match it, mind), and I feel a 150mm-e would most probably be too tight for me (the 135mm-e is a bit tighter than what I seem to pre-visualise, but by a negligible amount; I'll get used to it quickly).

Another thought: I don't really like the size of the 12-40mm f/2.8 on the E-M5 III, and the 75mm f/1.8's is almost the same, so ... On the other hand, its weight is just a tad above the 12-45mm's - which is a great lens in use*; though also more compact, which may be important. The 12-40mm f/2.8 always feels nose-heavy - not only because of its weight, but also because of the way it's balanced internally; lots of weight to the front, it appears ...**

Anyhow, if you want to stick with :mu43:, the 75mm is a no-brainer because it's such a great performer; noone I know of disagrees. For me, though, :mu43: is strictly the *compact* system, and I own and love the Sigma 60mm f/2.8 - in spite of its seemingly frugal specs and low price, it's a fantastic lens, and the best cure against lusting after the 75mm IMO. :mu43: means - to me - that I can cover everything up to 600mm-e with comparatively little bulk (the whole system fits into one medium-sized backpack!). The Fujifilm stuff is more about quality and results, a field where, in spite of all of its merits, :mu43: has its limitations. The 90mm f/2 fits that purpose perfectly - all the more since it's far less uncomfortable in use than I feared it might be (see **). That's also a testament to the clever design of the X-E3 - it's really small, but handles well with bigger lenses (better than the already nice GX9; the jury's still out as to how it compares to the E-M5 III***).

(I went OT a couple of times; I've put that stuff into footnotes to unclutter things; I hope it works.)

M.

*OT: Tthe 12-45mm f/4 is by far the best match to the smaller (and lighter) E-M5 III body. I kept the 12-40mm for low-light reportage, something it excels at - but the 12-45mm lives on the E-M5 III now (sometimes, the Sigma 30mm f/1.4 (:mu43:!) and 60mm f/2.8 get some use). And just to repeat that (I said it before): The 12-45mm f/4 *beats* the 18-55mm f/2.8-4 - in all respects, range, optics, ease of use ... and that's a fantastic achievement, as everyone who has handled the Fuji zoom will understand ...
**OT (slightly): It was a real eye-opener to handle the 12-100mm f/4 which, while a lot bigger and heavier, feels actually better balanced and less of a burden (that was on the E-M10, no less - though with the additional grip). The 90mm f/2 reminds me a lot of that!
***OT: I'm contemplating getting the grip for the E-M5 III because of all this - but may not even need the one I already ordered for the X-E3. I'll keep it anyway - all additional grips I own (several!) sometimes come in handy. Though I have to say it here and now: The worst(!) additional grip is the Leica one for the M10. I know what they thought - but the benefits are minor, and the downsides are considerable. The best additional grip I've ever seen and owned, on the other hand, was the one for the Olympus E-M10 ... the only camera I ever really regretted selling; it was such a well thought-out product. Yes, the GX9 and of course the E-M5 III take (slightly) better pictures and offer more, but the E-M10 was no slouch and handled like a dream when "gripped".
Thanks Matt. The 75 is truly the best example of what m43 has to offer, shockingly good results in such a compact package and not expensive compared to other platforms, I considered it unique....subject to how that 90 performs.
 

MoonMind

Hall of Famer
Dec 29, 2013
Switzerland
Matt
Thanks Matt. The 75 is truly the best example of what m43 has to offer, shockingly good results in such a compact package and not expensive compared to other platforms, I considered it unique....subject to how that 90 performs.
What I can say so far is that the 90mm f/2 is a great performer, and very versatile, at that. I'll shoot it again this week (just not today - :mu43: celebratory outing with the GF-1 :)) and may have more to show for it ... That said, I need 1/125s for it at the moment; I'm not yet used to the focal length and have produced a couple of blurry shots ... But that's certainly not the fault of the lens; if I get things right, it delivers.

M.
 

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