GAS: Please Share your Latest Acquisitions Big and Small

MiguelATF

Hall of Famer
Aug 27, 2013
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Miguel Tejada-Flores
A few years ago I briefly owned - and shot with - a 1st-generation Olympus Pen E-P1. And...I really liked it quite a lot. As a camera...and as a piece of classic post-modern industrial design. At the time I was using the often maligned 17mm Olympus pancake and it seemed to go nicely with the camera. Not the quickest processing engine - not the fastest focusing photographic tool - but there was something about the way it took pictures....that pleased me immensely. Then, for reasons which seemed logical and necessary to me at the time, I sold it. But, honestly, I've missed it ever since.

And, as more than one person has aptly commented, these days, the older E-P series Olympiiii can occasionally be found for a relative song. So I've kept my eyes open. And, wouldn't you know it, I stumbled upon a seller who had for sale not the E-P1, but its older and nearly-identical sibling, the E-P3 (which is basically an E-P1 with a small handful of nearly invisible fixes or improvements). So...I bought it. For a truly reasonable (euphemism for = insanely low) price.

The body arrived via the post today. It didn't have a lens but I have one or two extras around---

OlympusE-P3#1(front).jpg
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Olympus released a handful of E-P3's with an optional fancy fake-wood-grain grip, which this one has. It also boasts an add-on black leatherette skin (from aki-asahi, I believe)--

OlympusE-P3#2(side).jpg
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But it's really the design above all which I have to say appeals to me: I find there is something quite classic about its lines--

OlympusE-P3#3(rear).jpg
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I can't wait to put it through its paces.
 
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MiguelATF

Hall of Famer
Aug 27, 2013
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Miguel Tejada-Flores
@MiguelATF that looks good. I've considered picking an E-P5 or an E-PL7.
The E-P5 is another great - and underrated - Olympus. But with its processing and engine and focusing capabilities, it's a much more modern - and more capable - camera. Quite a few serious photographers and old-school Olympians prefer the EP5 to both the Pen F and the E-M5. In practical terms, though, they seem to cost significantly more than the E-P1 through E-P3 series - though these days most prices are fluctuating and subject to all kinds of unexpected weird ups and downs.
 

MoonMind

Hall of Famer
Dec 29, 2013
Switzerland
Matt
A few years ago I briefly owned - and shot with - a 1st-generation Olympus Pen E-P1. And...I really liked it quite a lot. As a camera...and as a piece of classic post-modern industrial design. At the time I was using the often maligned 17mm Olympus pancake and it seemed to go nicely with the camera. Not the quickest processing engine - not the fastest focusing photographic tool - but there was something about the way it took pictures....that pleased me immensely. Then, for reasons which seemed logical and necessary to me at the time, I sold it. But, honestly, I've missed it ever since.

And, as more than one person has aptly commented, these days, the older E-P series Olympiiii can occasionally be found for a relative song. So I've kept my eyes open. And, wouldn't you know it, I stumbled upon a seller who had for sale not the E-P1, but its older and nearly-identical sibling, the E-P3 (which is basically an E-P1 with a small handful of nearly invisible fixes or improvements). So...I bought it. For a truly reasonable (euphemism for = insanely low) price.

The body arrived via the post today. It didn't have a lens but I have one or two extras around---

View attachment 228498

Olympus released a handful of E-P3's with an optional fancy fake-wood-grain grip, which this one has. It also boasts an add-on black leatherette skin (from aki-asahi, I believe)--

View attachment 228499

But it's really the design above all which I have to say appeals to me: I find there is something quite classic about its lines--

View attachment 228500

I can't wait to put it through its paces.
For many of the same reasons, I sometimes still miss the E-PM1 - simpler, yes, but also smaller and just as elegant; and of course, the same "restrictions" (just a bit slower, a bit less "advanced" - but a very nice camera in use, very satisfying). Enjoy your E-P3! :)

M.
 
Apr 18, 2014
Boston Burbs
David
The E-P5 is another great - and underrated - Olympus. But with its processing and engine and focusing capabilities, it's a much more modern - and more capable - camera. Quite a few serious photographers and old-school Olympians prefer the EP5 to both the Pen F and the E-M5. In practical terms, though, they seem to cost significantly more than the E-P1 through E-P3 series - though these days most prices are fluctuating and subject to all kinds of unexpected weird ups and downs.
I considered another E-P5 before getting the Pen F. I would have preferred the tilt screen, but the built in EVF made a big difference.

For many of the same reasons, I sometimes still miss the E-PM1 - simpler, yes, but also smaller and just as elegant; and of course, the same "restrictions" (just a bit slower, a bit less "advanced" - but a very nice camera in use, very satisfying). Enjoy your E-P3! :)

M.
The E-PM1 was my first m4/3 camera, sadly it had a battery issue and kept losing the date/time on a battery change.

There was an interesting part to one of one of the recent rumors around a Pen F II. The rumor said there might be two versions, or maybe a Pen F II and E-P#. I was really hoping to see a simplified version. Most rumors about the sale say there is still going to be a new body this year. One can still hope.
 

mnhoj

gee aahrr
Jan 27, 2012
Los Angeles
John
@MiguelATF
Great find.

I have a soft spot for PENs. Had quite a few in my day.
PENs, lites and minis. Have an E-P5 now and like it quite a lot.
Maybe my worst favorite cameras.

There was an interesting part to one of one of the recent rumors around a Pen F II. The rumor said there might be two versions, or maybe a Pen F II and E-P#. I was really hoping to see a simplified version. Most rumors about the sale say there is still going to be a new body this year. One can still hope.
The F seems pretty amazing but I always craved for a simpler built in EVF version.
Instead of building the M10 series, I wish they would've EVF'd an E-P6 and E-PL6.
Would've been very interesting.
I still have hope.
 

MoonMind

Hall of Famer
Dec 29, 2013
Switzerland
Matt
Instead of building the M10 series, I wish they would've EVF'd an E-P6 and E-PL6.
They did. It's called the E-PL7 - a brilliant camera if you can (unlike me) live without a viewfinder. We're at the E-PL10 now, but for me, the E-PL7 was the pinnacle and had all the E-PL mojo you can think of; it also had - by some margin - the best handling of the whole series. It is, essentially, an E-M10 without a viewfinder, and, as such, a mini E-P5 (minus one control dial and some functionality, whose absence never bothered me; the I.B.I.S. is less sophisticated though).

I still consider it the best camera of that type I've ever shot with, the GR series notwithstanding (they're different in that they're still smaller and sport a bigger sensor - so they have an excuse for being fiddly). It was comfortable to hold and quick to shoot, with a much better touchscreen interface than everything else in that respect (leagues ahead of the GR III, e.g. ...). Every time I pick up the GR III to do some serious shooting (every day, this month), I wish it handled as elegantly as the E-PL7. And as the GR III handles nicely in its own way, that's saying something ...

The E-PL series is stuck with the 16MP sensor, though. I sold the GX80, E-PL7 and E-M10 for the GX9 ... I wanted that 20MP sensor, and I was right. But that doesn't take away from the fact that all three were wonderful cameras. Between the three, I used the E-PL7 the least for one single reason: no EVF. I always hoped they'd manage to add a tiny one even (like the one in the Panasonic GM5) - it'd have been good enough for me. But they decided to go the "cute route" and turned the E-PL line into a livestyle product; along the way, they killed the camera for me everyone taking photography serious, it seems. So, if you want to experience what it could have become, get an E-PL7.

The E-PM1 was my first m4/3 camera, sadly it had a battery issue and kept losing the date/time on a battery change.
Mine developed the same issue as it got older ... Still, it was such a nice camera in the hand; the I.B.I.S. was pretty useless, though. In a way, it's silly to be nostalgic about it - but it's a nice kind of sillyness, like still enjoying Chrismas cookies ...

M.
 

mnhoj

gee aahrr
Jan 27, 2012
Los Angeles
John
They did. It's called the E-PL7 - a brilliant camera if you can (unlike me) live without a viewfinder. We're at the E-PL10 now, but for me, the E-PL7 was the pinnacle and had all the E-PL mojo you can think of; it also had - by some margin - the best handling of the whole series. It is, essentially, an E-M10 without a viewfinder, and, as such, a mini E-P5 (minus one control dial and some functionality, whose absence never bothered me; the I.B.I.S. is less sophisticated though).

I still consider it the best camera of that type I've ever shot with, the GR series notwithstanding (they're different in that they're still smaller and sport a bigger sensor - so they have an excuse for being fiddly). It was comfortable to hold and quick to shoot, with a much better touchscreen interface than everything else in that respect (leagues ahead of the GR III, e.g. ...). Every time I pick up the GR III to do some serious shooting (every day, this month), I wish it handled as elegantly as the E-PL7. And as the GR III handles nicely in its own way, that's saying something ...

The E-PL series is stuck with the 16MP sensor, though. I sold the GX80, E-PL7 and E-M10 for the GX9 ... I wanted that 20MP sensor, and I was right. But that doesn't take away from the fact that all three were wonderful cameras. Between the three, I used the E-PL7 the least for one single reason: no EVF. I always hoped they'd manage to add a tiny one even (like the one in the Panasonic GM5) - it'd have been good enough for me. But they decided to go the "cute route" and turned the E-PL line into a livestyle product; along the way, they killed the camera for me everyone taking photography serious, it seems. So, if you want to experience what it could have become, get an E-PL7.


Mine developed the same issue as it got older ... Still, it was such a nice camera in the hand; the I.B.I.S. was pretty useless, though. In a way, it's silly to be nostalgic about it - but it's a nice kind of sillyness, like still enjoying Chrismas cookies ...

M.
What I meant Matt was I had hoped the E-PL7 series had adapted to a built in viewfinder instead of the introduction of the E-M10 series(which is a great camera) just lacking the swagger of the PEN. And I think there was room for a PEN with slightly better specs but not as full blown as the F.

That probably would've kept me from wandering off to Fuji.

If I see a PL-7 wandering I just may pick one up, purely upon your recommendation - which I highly value btw.
 

drd1135

Zen Snapshooter
Jul 13, 2011
Lexington, VA
Steve
They did. It's called the E-PL7 - a brilliant camera if you can (unlike me) live without a viewfinder. We're at the E-PL10 now, but for me, the E-PL7 was the pinnacle and had all the E-PL mojo you can think of; it also had - by some margin - the best handling of the whole series. It is, essentially, an E-M10 without a viewfinder, and, as such, a mini E-P5 (minus one control dial and some functionality, whose absence never bothered me; the I.B.I.S. is less sophisticated though).

I still consider it the best camera of that type I've ever shot with, the GR series notwithstanding (they're different in that they're still smaller and sport a bigger sensor - so they have an excuse for being fiddly). It was comfortable to hold and quick to shoot, with a much better touchscreen interface than everything else in that respect (leagues ahead of the GR III, e.g. ...). Every time I pick up the GR III to do some serious shooting (every day, this month), I wish it handled as elegantly as the E-PL7. And as the GR III handles nicely in its own way, that's saying something ...

The E-PL series is stuck with the 16MP sensor, though. I sold the GX80, E-PL7 and E-M10 for the GX9 ... I wanted that 20MP sensor, and I was right. But that doesn't take away from the fact that all three were wonderful cameras. Between the three, I used the E-PL7 the least for one single reason: no EVF. I always hoped they'd manage to add a tiny one even (like the one in the Panasonic GM5) - it'd have been good enough for me. But they decided to go the "cute route" and turned the E-PL line into a livestyle product; along the way, they killed the camera for me everyone taking photography serious, it seems. So, if you want to experience what it could have become, get an E-PL7.


Mine developed the same issue as it got older ... Still, it was such a nice camera in the hand; the I.B.I.S. was pretty useless, though. In a way, it's silly to be nostalgic about it - but it's a nice kind of sillyness, like still enjoying Chrismas cookies ...

M.
I thought I was alone in my opinion of the E-PL7. It has that good 16 mp sensor and a nice flip screen lets you do waist level shooting while resting the screen against your midsection. The three axes stabilization wasn't quite as good as the 5 axes one but far superior to the earlier two axes version. I spend a whole week in Philly shooting with only the E-PL7 and I never felt it was a limitation.
 

wt21

Hall of Famer
Aug 15, 2010
There was a big jump in IQ going from the 12 mp sensor to the 16 mp sensor in Olympus bodies. It was more than just a jump in resolution. DR and noise were greatly improved.
I agree BUT ... the 12MP sensor had very nice colors and the resolution was well matched to the earlier lenses. I thought the EP3 had some very nice and interesting output, and was certainly a camera that (then and now) was unique in appearance and handling. It got attention then, and would do so today :)
 

MoonMind

Hall of Famer
Dec 29, 2013
Switzerland
Matt
If we continue this discussion, I'll end up with another E-PM1 ... they can be had NOS around here for very little money. That said, I didn't pay more than $250 for my first one - it was heavily discounted nine months after launch already. People just didn't get it here in Switzerland - too little bling, too little prestige. But it *was* a very nice camera.

I'll go for a walk ASAP to smother the impulse ;)

M.
 

Jonathan F/2

Top Veteran
Aug 21, 2011
Los Angeles, USA
As a former M43 shooter, my discovery of the Nikon 1 J5 blew me away for small form factor cameras. It's definitely the best of the Nikon 1 series before they scrapped the whole system. It's like a GM1/5, but with OSPDAF. With the 10mm 2.8 (28mm FOV) it satisfies my needs as a small form factor pocket camera!
 

wt21

Hall of Famer
Aug 15, 2010
I just ordered a Canon M200 w/kit lens from B&H. I had to order it from a store, because I'm not 100% sure on it. Idea is: M200 + 22 prime for walkaround, G85 + P100-300 for wildlife (also keeping the Super-tan 50/1.4, because it's gorgeous on m43), Canon RP + 24-240 for at home (and group events if those ever happen again). Three very different use cases.
 
Apr 18, 2014
Boston Burbs
David
I thought I was alone in my opinion of the E-PL7. It has that good 16 mp sensor and a nice flip screen lets you do waist level shooting while resting the screen against your midsection. The three axes stabilization wasn't quite as good as the 5 axes one but far superior to the earlier two axes version. I spend a whole week in Philly shooting with only the E-PL7 and I never felt it was a limitation.
Not alone, if it only had even a marginal EVF.
 

drd1135

Zen Snapshooter
Jul 13, 2011
Lexington, VA
Steve
There are clip-ons, but I’m always afraid of breaking them off. I can throw the EPL7 with the 20 in a jacket pocket, but a clip-on EVF makes that harder unless you want to keep taking it off.
 

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