GAS: Please Share your Latest Acquisitions Big and Small

drd1135

Zen Snapshooter
Jul 13, 2011
Lexington, VA
Steve
I think it’s a PM1 or PL3.
It's the E-PL3. Similar thin metallic body to the E-PM1 (on the right below) but it is the only 12 mp Pen with a flip screen. It's so much easier with which to shoot. The E-P3 has a touch screen. The key point of the later 12 mp models is that the screens are much better, and this is nice since this is how you frame the shot.
IMG_2517.jpg
IMG_2521.jpg
 
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Jonathan F/2

Top Veteran
Aug 21, 2011
Los Angeles, USA
It's the E-PL3. Similar thin metallic body to the E-PM1 (on the right below) but it is the only 12 mp Pen with a flip screen. It's so much easier with which to shoot. The E-P3 has a touch screen. The kep point of the later 12 mp models is that the screens are much better, and this is nice since this is how you frame the shot.
View attachment 230480View attachment 230481
Man, this trip down memory lane is making miss my old M43 bodies. I had a lot of fun with those cameras. I tend to to think M43 images really shined at 12-16mp. I wasn't too fond of the 20mp sensors. Strangely I tend to prefer 1" at 20mp, than I do M43 at 20mp. I wonder if it has to do with the BSI tech? I wonder why BSI sensors weren't used in the 4:3 format?
 

drd1135

Zen Snapshooter
Jul 13, 2011
Lexington, VA
Steve
Man, this trip down memory lane is making miss my old M43 bodies. I had a lot of fun with those cameras. I tend to to think M43 images really shined at 12-16mp. I wasn't too fond of the 20mp sensors. Strangely I tend to prefer 1" at 20mp, than I do M43 at 20mp. I wonder if it has to do with the BSI tech? I wonder why BSI sensors weren't used in the 4:3 format?
I suspect that Olympus could NOT afford to get Sony to make them.
 
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Jonathan F/2

Top Veteran
Aug 21, 2011
Los Angeles, USA
I suspect that Olympus could afford to get Sony to make them.
I think for smaller format and high res sensors, BSI tech makes a huge difference. The color tonal range and highlight recovery from my Nikon J5 is a little better than when I was shooting with the Pen-F. I think the 4:3 sensor would see a major boost in image quality.
 

Matero

All-Pro
Jan 28, 2014
Helsinki, Finland
The E-P5 is really just as good as the Pen-F in most significant ways - but it's such a fine camera in its own right that it could easily replace your Pen-F....especially if you're not really using it that much. The only additional extra which would be nice would be one of those cool hot-shoe-mounted Olympus EVF's - I remember the one I shot with years ago (atop an E-PL2 body) was everything that I wanted or needed.

The EP5 is such a beautifully designed camera, too.......

Congrats!
I agree, with VF-4 Pen 5 is one the finest cameras I've used. That's why I'm not gonna depart with it anytime soon :)
 
Apr 18, 2014
Boston Burbs
David
The E-P5 was/is a nice body, great build and nice feel in the hand.. For me the Pen F adds just enough so that I wouldn't trade.

It's funny now that I think about it. I had the E-P5 when I also had the E-M1.1. At the time I thought it was a great combo. Fast forward 6 years and I have the Pen F and E-M1.2, I think I've had 10-12 bodies in between.
 

ErichH

Veteran
Jun 11, 2020
My kids are firmly under my wife's influence...they don't hesitate to rat me out when new gear arrives! :roflmao:
I'm guessing that your wife is giving out food for the kids. Food's always been a great argument when convincing someone about something.
 

BrianS

Legend
Jul 7, 2010

I've been using PC104 for embedded computers since before they standardized it- going back to the Ampro Littleboard Z80a 4MHz board with 64KBytes of memory running CP/m. That board, in it's "Toaster Oven" enclosure with two 5.25" floppy drives cost more than most of the higher-end computers today. Those boards, early 1980s. Ampro screwed up the device drivers for the floppy disks ROYALLY. The device driver used dead data off the stack. That meant that an interrupt occurring while the disk was being written to crashed the system. I called them up and chewed them out after disassembling the BIOS to find out why my realtime data acquisition code was crashing. I had it interfaced to the NAV computer of an Orion P3, recording data. Crashing Bad.

Picking up a 1GHz CPU, 1GByte of memory PC104 card for under $80 each- just wow. These are a fraction of the cost of most embedded CPU cards. These Boards- run all of my Protected Mode DOS code using WATCOM, Pharlap, and Microway tools. The company, ICOP is Taiwan based. They have a saying at that company, "DOS will never Die". And- running DOS with 1GByte of memory on a 1GHz processor is Fast. Very, very fast. And they got the device driver right for the USB connected Floppy drive that I use.

I figure if I'm getting paid to work at home, I can buy these for work. Too much fun. I made an offer on two more boards. A million and one uses.
 

MiguelATF

Hall of Famer
Aug 27, 2013
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Miguel Tejada-Flores
Though I am a total noob with regards to astrophotography, I've always both been fascinated by it - and also wanted to try my hand at it. And my Pentax KP came with built-in 'Astrotracer' software. So....I finally gave in and purchased one of the Pentax O-GPS1 units which (supposedly) does all kinds of cool things. Here it is---

X30_July31_Astrotracer#1.jpg


A view from in front---

X30_July31_Astrotracer#2.jpg


And a close-up---

X30_July31_Astrotracer#3.jpg


And here is one of my first 'test images'/attempts to play around with it, taken during a recent camping trip in eastern Oregon where the nighttime views of the sky have very little of the light-pollution which exists even in smaller semi-urban areas--

KP_July24_Stars+Car_60secsf4.5.jpg


The light trails and car at the bottom came when a car drove into frame during the longish time exposure.
Probable next step: finding myself a more solid tripod.
 

ErichH

Veteran
Jun 11, 2020
Also got me a pair of Zenit-E bodies.
Both with working selenium cell light meters.
FV5_0402-01.jpeg
One of the bodies, 1966 vintage, has the M39 mount. This I've never seen on a Zenit-E before. I thought they were only made in M42 mount. Maybe someone's swapped the mount. Anyway, I'm keeping that one. It'll make a good rear lens cap for my M39 aluminum Helios-44.
 
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ErichH

Veteran
Jun 11, 2020
I've looked into the Zenit-E story a bit further.
It seems that the earliest production run of Zenit-E indeed was made with the M39 mount.



Other differences from the usual Zenit-E are the white shutter speed dial (of the same type as the speed dial of the Zenit 3M), and the different covering material, which both are present on my body, a very early one: the 7196th camera produced.

Early Zenit-E [Serial # 66007196]




Standard Zenit-E [Serial # 71073092]




The Zenit-E was produced between 1965 and 1986, with the first two digits of the serial number indicating the production year.
 
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Mr_Flibble

Top Veteran
Aug 16, 2013
The Lowlands
Rick
We're all horrible bunch of enablers, ErichH. Either here or on pages like the Vintage Camera Collectors Group on Facebook ;)

I'm still waiting on a 2x3 Auto Graflex R.B. at the moment.
And there's a No.1 Crown Tripod in the works.
 

MiguelATF

Hall of Famer
Aug 27, 2013
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Miguel Tejada-Flores
I just bought a lightly-used - and quite light (carbon) travel tripod, for future Oregon backcountry excursions.
No, my budget couldn't afford a Gitzo - but it's a nifty and nicely made small bit of kit.
An Oben CT-3535 --



It seems to do most of the things I want a small tripod to do.



It even came with a rather decent ball-head + plate ---



I'm not normally a 'tripod person' but there have been times I wished I had one with me. Hopefully the minimal weight and dimensions of this one will actually mean I'll wind up taking it along....instead of leaving it behind.
 

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