GAS: Please Share your Latest Acquisitions Big and Small

mnhoj

gee aahrr
Location
Los Angeles
Real Name
John
O M G
I just took delivery of a Graphite X-PRO2.
I've always wanted a PRO2 but thought the T and H were better for the value.
I think I was right but I don't care. This thing is gorgeous and feels great in hand.

And a barely used Barton 1972 black leather strap to boot.
Talk about indulgence.

Now to find a fitting soft release.
 

agentlossing

All-Pro
Location
S. Oregon Coast (the Northernmost-Cal of them All)
Real Name
Andrew Lossing
O M G
I just took delivery of a Graphite X-PRO2.
I've always wanted a PRO2 but thought the T and H were better for the value.
I think I was right but I don't care. This thing is gorgeous and feels great in hand.

And a barely used Barton 1972 black leather strap to boot.
Talk about indulgence.

Now to find a fitting soft release.
That setup sounds like one of the few Fuji's I'd get really jazzed about.
 

gryphon1911

Hall of Famer
Location
Central Ohio, USA
Real Name
Andrew
Needed a new phone case for the wife and I so got this for me from Casetify:
casetify_camera_iphone11promax.jpg
 

mnhoj

gee aahrr
Location
Los Angeles
Real Name
John
You are correct - that is one beautiful camera. I LOVE shooting with the XPRO2 and X100V. There is just something about the experience that is so, so satisfying to me.
Makes me wonder if the land of Leica would give me the same/similar "feels"?

That is too expensive to be an experiment, but the XPRO satisfies! :)

I was really surprised at the girth of it.
Makes for a nice hand hold.

I've blocked the "L" out of my mind so the PRO2 will have to suffice.
Maybe a future X100V. I think I would really like that one too.
 

gryphon1911

Hall of Famer
Location
Central Ohio, USA
Real Name
Andrew
I was really surprised at the girth of it.
Makes for a nice hand hold.

I've blocked the "L" out of my mind so the PRO2 will have to suffice.
Maybe a future X100V. I think I would really like that one too.

If you like the XPRO, you'll like the X100V. Everything you love about the XPRO2, but with newer insides and a bit smaller to fit in your jacket pocket if you desire it.
 

MiguelATF

Hall of Famer
Location
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Real Name
Miguel Tejada-Flores
This is the second Lumix 20mm lens I've owned; the first was v.1, and literally lived on two tiny micro four thirds cameras I used to own, a GM1 and a GM5; but it wound up being given to a good photographer friend, in need of a nifty prime... and I've missed it ever since. My new copy is v.2 - and I have a feeling it is going to 'live' for awhile, semi-permanently attached, to my Pen F.

Lumix_20mm.jpg


And, no, it doesn't focus as fast as the 15mm PanaLeica... but I don't really mind.
 

drd1135

Zen Snapshooter
Location
SW Virginia
Real Name
Steve
Bought a US Army Signal Corps Cine-Kodak Magazine 16 kit. it includes a case and various filters and lenses.

View attachment 247236

It was used in the 1940s by the Baltimore Signal Depot in Fort Holabird.

Anyone interested in taking my US Navy-marked one off my hands now? ;)
I'm so glad you buy all this stuff so the rest of us can look at it.
 

MiguelATF

Hall of Famer
Location
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Real Name
Miguel Tejada-Flores
At long last, I've acquired a slightly newer Lumix which comes close to replicating both the dimensions and the overall 'feel' of one of my former favorite cameras, from a few years ago, the Lumix GX7. My new purchase - 'new' to me, though actually it came lightly used, purchased from a good photographer - is a Lumix GX9.

I think my 15mm PanaLeica lens may wind up semi-permanently affixed to the front of it---

GX9_front.jpg


The top plate has design cues from both the GX7 and the GX8. (I rather like the round exposure compensation dial, though its placement isn't as well implemented as on the larger GX8.)

GX9_top.jpg


The rear is pretty standard stuff, with a screen that conveniently flips out and down, something I appreciate with certain angles or shooting stances. Most of the controls feel totally familiar for someone who has shot quite a bit with other Lumixes---

GX9_rear.jpg


The other really nice 'extra', which the person I bought this from included in the sale, is the factory grip - which so far seems to make the camera feel like it fits much better in the hand. Without the additional grip, the built-in grip is beautifully designed, but doesn't feel as nice or as practical as that of the GX7, or that of the much larger GX8.

GX9_grip.jpg


The final benefit: the click-stopped aperture ring on my 15mm lens works perfectly with this camera... whereas it didn't (work at all) on my Pen F. Kind of fun, being able to set the aperture 'manually' so to spek, again.
 

rayvonn

Hall of Famer
At long last, I've acquired a slightly newer Lumix which comes close to replicating both the dimensions and the overall 'feel' of one of my former favorite cameras, from a few years ago, the Lumix GX7. My new purchase - 'new' to me, though actually it came lightly used, purchased from a good photographer - is a Lumix GX9.

I think my 15mm PanaLeica lens may wind up semi-permanently affixed to the front of it---

View attachment 247437

The top plate has design cues from both the GX7 and the GX8. (I rather like the round exposure compensation dial, though its placement isn't as well implemented as on the larger GX8.)

View attachment 247439

The rear is pretty standard stuff, with a screen that conveniently flips out and down, something I appreciate with certain angles or shooting stances. Most of the controls feel totally familiar for someone who has shot quite a bit with other Lumixes---

View attachment 247440

The other really nice 'extra', which the person I bought this from included in the sale, is the factory grip - which so far seems to make the camera feel like it fits much better in the hand. Without the additional grip, the built-in grip is beautifully designed, but doesn't feel as nice or as practical as that of the GX7, or that of the much larger GX8.

View attachment 247441

The final benefit: the click-stopped aperture ring on my 15mm lens works perfectly with this camera... whereas it didn't (work at all) on my Pen F. Kind of fun, being able to set the aperture 'manually' so to spek, again.
Miguel, I liked the shot of the back screen set in b&w, brings to mind visualising a shot that way in JPEG mode while shooting in raw, resulting in a b&w jpeg and colour raw file to work with in PP. This of course helps enormously with focus peaking too and is, I understand, a common way Leica CL users do their focusing. I’d imagine this would be a very satisfying with your setup too.
 

MiguelATF

Hall of Famer
Location
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Real Name
Miguel Tejada-Flores
Miguel, I liked the shot of the back screen set in b&w, brings to mind visualising a shot that way in JPEG mode while shooting in raw, resulting in a b&w jpeg and colour raw file to work with in PP. This of course helps enormously with focus peaking too and is, I understand, a common way Leica CL users do their focusing. I’d imagine this would be a very satisfying with your setup too.

Hmmm... interesting. I had no idea Leica CL users did that. I find it helpful for 'seeing' the scene in black and white (or monochrome) - and also when I'm using one of the in-camera b&w jpeg settings. Recent Lumixes and some Olympuses (Olympii?) have a number of different excellent monochrome settings - including the Fuji's with their in-camera Acros simulations, etc. And then, if one shoots in both the jpeg setting + RAW - it gives you all kinds of options in PP, should you choose to go down those garden paths.

The effect is even more marked when you put your eye to the EVF - and see the scene in black & white through the viewfinder. I've sometimes found it helps to 'get me into the mood' to visualize things in a different way. So you're totally right: it is a satisfying shooting mode, with the GX9 - but I've also used it on the GX8 and the GX7 and it worked nicely on those older cameras, too.

I remember, a million years ago when I was attending a film school, in a cinematography class, learning about what was supposed to be one of the cameraman's most important tools - a "gaffer's glass" - a variation of a ND filter which allowed you to 'see' the nature of contrast, light, and shadow - and the specific components of different light sources - in a way the naked eye is unable to. If you didn't have a gaffer's glass, sometimes very dark sunglasses helped - or even squinting. In a strange way, what all those techniques or tools did - was to reduce a colored scene to a monochrome one --- which is sort of what happens when you have your camera's screen - or EVF - set to one or another possible monochrome modes.

I think that's the part I appreciate the most about this approach - it helps me see light - and shadow - more easily. But there are always surprises between what I thought I was getting - and what's actually in the picture ;)
 

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