GAS: Please Share your Latest Desires Big and Small

mike3996

Hall of Famer
Apr 2, 2018
Finland
On the GX80 ergos, is it the grip or control/layout? I added a fotodiox grip/plate and it feels pretty good. I think I'm going to add a thumb grip if I can figure out which one. I use back button focus so it may block it. 50/50 on that.
It's such a small body that with larger lenses it becomes a hassle. Maybe an extra grip would help. The buttons back are nice but flushed with the body. It currently prevents me from going BBF. Planting a small ball of sugru on the AF-ON would work wonders I believe.
 

MoonMind

Hall of Famer
Dec 29, 2013
Switzerland
Matt
I thought they just added sealing and changed the exterior?
No, according to the few online review I found, the optics have been optimised, overall sharpness is better, especially in the corners.

But I found out that prices around here are sky-high. I have a lens I really like in that range and speed (the Sigma 30mm f/1.4); I'll forgo the 25mm f/1.4 II for the time being.

I've said it before, I'm sure, but anyway: The ultimate companion lens for the E-M5 III is the 12-45mm f/4 PRO. Great lens in every respect (maybe except for manual focus, but I don't feel the need for that on Olympus bodies at all frequently; besides, it's still good). The combo outdoes the Canon G1X III I was using as a compact all-weather solution up until now by a comfortable margin. Yes, I can slip the Canon into a pocket, so it's still useful. But now I'd pick the E-M5 III for actually bad-weather shooting (or the Z6 - but that's 60% heavier and doesn't offer the same reach; IQ on the 12-45mm is pretty competitive compared with the Z 24-70mm f/4, but of course, it's not quite as versatile when it comes to subject isolation).

Anyhow, I find it curious that there still aren't more reviews of the 25mm f/1.4 II - probably a testament to the qualities of the original ...

It's such a small body that with larger lenses it becomes a hassle. Maybe an extra grip would help. The buttons back are nice but flushed with the body. It currently prevents me from going BBF. Planting a small ball of sugru on the AF-ON would work wonders I believe.
I have the extra grip Panasonic provides and am in two mind about it. It helps with really big lenses (the 100-300mm II, for instance), but it changes the way you have to hold the camera. It works, but I find it a bit unnerving that it doesn't *feel* a lot more secure ... Maybe a third party, full length grip would work better. I don't know.

M.
 

mnhoj

gee aahrr
Jan 27, 2012
Los Angeles
John
It's such a small body that with larger lenses it becomes a hassle. Maybe an extra grip would help. The buttons back are nice but flushed with the body. It currently prevents me from going BBF. Planting a small ball of sugru on the AF-ON would work wonders I believe.
I fashioned a small oval of gaffers tape for the button - is easy to find now. Lasted a while so far too.
I've used thumb grips in conjunction with finger grips on the Fuji X-Es and it really feels nice.
I'll likely try and find one that fits.
 

agentlossing

Top Veteran
The PL25 has been one of my favorites in the past. It makes a look that I really like. I had planned on getting one but found a Sigma 30 1.4 for $120 on CL. It's bigger and longer(which I actually like) and renders a nice looking image as well.

On the GX80 ergos, is it the grip or control/layout? I added a fotodiox grip/plate and it feels pretty good. I think I'm going to add a thumb grip if I can figure out which one. I use back button focus so it may block it. 50/50 on that.
Most any thumb grip will work on the GX85/80 unless it specifically drops downward toward the end. I had one of the less practical ones, as it wasn't very long, but it was still better than nothing.

 
Apr 18, 2014
Boston Burbs
David
Most any thumb grip will work on the GX85/80 unless it specifically drops downward toward the end. I had one of the less practical ones, as it wasn't very long, but it was still better than nothing.....
I've found I like 1/2 cases on rangefinder style bodies since I use a wrist strap and tend to use a finger tip type grip.

 

mike3996

Hall of Famer
Apr 2, 2018
Finland
Getting desires to buy a "nice" camera backbag. Compact so that it could be used in urban environments but perhaps some hiking features also incorporated. Maybe something with the side access so that it's part sling bag, part backbag. How cool is that. Very cool.

My Leica doesn't need a backbag and I don't go hiking so often I could justify another bag, but since I'm ever-fantasizing about the Df, the extra weight proposes questions.

The two 990 € Dfs fortunately sold and in theory I don't have GAS for it right now... yet I have this feeling maybe I should buy it brand new :eek:

'The only way to get rid of temptation is to yield to it. — Oscar Wilde
 
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Getting desires to buy a "nice" camera backbag. Compact so that it could be used in urban environments but perhaps some hiking features also incorporated. Maybe something with the side access so that it's part sling bag, part backbag. How cool is that. Very cool.

My Leica doesn't need a backbag and I don't go hiking so often I could justify another bag, but since I'm ever-fantasizing about the Df, the extra weight proposes questions.

The two 990 € Dfs fortunately sold and in theory I don't have GAS for it right now... yet I have this feeling maybe I should buy it brand new :eek:

'The only way to get rid of temptation is to yield to it. — Oscar Wilde
For urban walks I almost always use the Think Tank Turnstyle 10 V2.0. It's a sling bag and it's an excellent compromise between carrying comfort and ease of access. It can hold the Sony A7Rm4 with a Zeiss Batis 2/40 CF (quite a big lens, lens hood mounted reverse), a Zeiss Loxia 2.4/85 with the long lens hood mounted ready to shoot (not inverted) and a Zeiss Loxia 2.8/21. This is the kit I had with me this afternoon when visiting a war museum with my wife. There's still place for a small lens above or below the 21mm, something like the Loxia 2/35 easily fits. Might be ideal for a Leica with a bunch of small Leica lenses, 4 or 5 lenses should be feasible.

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For outings where I want to take extra stuff like an umbrella, rain coat, lunch (good old Dutch habit), sensor blower etc., I take the Mindshift Rotation Panorama. This bag holds about the same amount of photo gear in the belt compartment. Great thing is that you don't need to put down the bag to get to your photo gear and carrying comfort is quite good. See an earlier post of mine. There's a good review at phillipreeve.net.
 

mike3996

Hall of Famer
Apr 2, 2018
Finland
For outings where I want to take extra stuff like an umbrella, rain coat, lunch (good old Dutch habit), sensor blower etc., I take the Mindshift Rotation Panorama. This bag holds about the same amount of photo gear in the belt compartment. Great thing is that you don't need to put down the bag to get to your photo gear and carrying comfort is quite good. See an earlier post of mine. There's a good review at phillipreeve.net.
Really cool :D

I believe I'd enjoy a slingbag as it would both (1) not sweat up my back in the warm, and (2) offer a way to carry a bit heavier while not destructing my back.

But as a tradeoff, most slingbags are not going to fit very large amount of stuff. With the tradeoffs back and forth I think Billingham will fight these things well. Back breaking as it may be...

So if I'm getting anything, maybe it's a real backpack.

These bags fit suitably more. Two 0.5 liter bottles instead of one in the Billingham, likewise in the winter times fit a larg(er) thermos of coffee in it. As for body/lens choices some cool options out there are so heavy I wouldn't even think of getting them to carry in a shoulder bag like Hadley. So good weight distribution and all that.


How about these "Airport" models, sturdy cases with wheels? Get a sufficiently sturdy one and it could actually provide big benefits for a street shooter. First, it would act as a portable chair to park your bottom. Maybe you found a good spot to fish for shots and now you can fish while sitting! 🤡 Secondly assuming it's really sturdy, one could stand on it to gain 0.5 m of extra perspective.
 
How about these "Airport" models, sturdy cases with wheels? Get a sufficiently sturdy one and it could actually provide big benefits for a street shooter. First, it would act as a portable chair to park your bottom. Maybe you found a good spot to fish for shots and now you can fish while sitting! 🤡 Secondly assuming it's really sturdy, one could stand on it to gain 0.5 m of extra perspective.
I seriously thought about such a case and I even bought a used LowePro one that can be carried as a backpack as well as a rolling case; it was only € 60 so what the heck, might come in handy some day. Main problem for street use: you have to fix it to your body by a chain or so to prevent someone running off with it; I'm 66 and not the best runner so I won't catch up with a young and agile thief. The sling bag mentioned before is my go-to bag for street outings and I have to think hard to find some negatives; well, maybe one: the side bag doesn't offer a lot of space, thick items won't fit. I now have a credit-card sized powerbank for my phone, a spare camera battery and two ND filters (67mm and 52mm) and it can't hold much more.
 

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