GAS: Please Share your Latest Desires Big and Small

serhan

Hall of Famer
Location
NYC
That means new XE4 will have IBIS... I am waiting for X100Z with IBIS... Even iphone now has IBIS these days:) Also A7C is going to be released next week...

While I was at the camera size website, i noticed they have a size for the X-S10. It turns out it is essentially the size of the X100V:
It you go the the bottom view with lenses, you realize the grip extends about as far as the 27 mm:
It only weights 80 g more, and that is essentially the lens.
 

donlaw

Hall of Famer
Location
Texas
Real Name
Don
A funny story. In 1973 (I was 15), I had an older friend of mine drive to a camera store armed with $150 of my money to buy me a camera. On his suggestion, he was going to buy a Nikkormat. Instead, he came back with a Pentax SP 500 because he got a better deal. I then used only Pentaxes for the next 30 years. I always wondered what would’ve happened if he come back with that Nikkormat.
I used to go to the library and read Popular Photography and Modern Photography. From reading this I decided in 1971 (age 16) that I wanted a Nikkormat and a 50mm f1.4 lens. Some how I convinced my parents to buy it for me. I have been a Nikon fan every since. I could have gone Pentax then too. But I really wanted and liked the Nikon F2 (no way my parents would have gone for that) and started down the slippery slope of lusting after high end cameras.
 

serhan

Hall of Famer
Location
NYC
I was just starting:)
An XE4, a new X100Z, an iPhone 12 , and an A7C. You're doing this thread proud.
As Ming Thein said:
"In the long run, I’m actually less concerned about the image quality part than ever before – not only have we past the point of sufficiency, but every subsequent sensor generation improves – albeit by smaller and smaller increments. The rest of the hardware, UI, user experience etc. will be the differentiating factor. For a few, photography is purely work – and you probably wouldn’t bother spending this kind of money on your tools if something cheaper will be deemed acceptable. For the majority, photography is something we do because we enjoy it or because we are compelled to it, and GAS is an unavoidable consequence: we must enjoy our tools too, in order to be creative. Notice this second category doesn’t really separate between pros and amateurs: to be a good creative, you have to have the mental latitude to want to experiment and not worry about your tools. Better yet, you have to feel good about your tools and enjoy using them. Beyond that – we want the flexibility to make better pictures under a wider range of conditions with more output options. I carried a record low amount of equipment – but felt like I wasn’t missing anything. What’s not to like?"

Of course he was talking about Hasselblad:) For me anything that fits into my coat pocket... I am fine with G1X III except a few times I need a longer reach for birds and maybe a better sensor with higher dynamic range.... I am still a serious compact shooter...
 

mike3996

Hall of Famer
Location
Finland
As Ming Thein said:

--- we must enjoy our tools too, in order to be creative. --- to be a good creative, you have to have the mental latitude to want to experiment and not worry about your tools. Better yet, you have to feel good about your tools and enjoy using them. ---

He wrote well. I have occasionally used the phrase "user experience" (UX) to talk about the same idea. Usability of a tool is super important but once that's covered, UX steps in. It's like Maslow's hierarchy but for camera gear. :)

It was a tough pill to swallow but Leica M taught me it's not about the optimal image quality, it's about the UX that has to be 100% right to ultimately sustain the hobby.

Just two examples of what contributes to this UX, at least for myself personally:

- Autofocus on the field: fast, snappy, reliable, verifiable... does it feel you're getting the focus on the field, with the camera on your eye?
- Your prior experience of this camera nailing the focus (seen in post): you may shoot confidently on the field but then come back and see the focus is not alright even though the camera might have given you the green light. These failures will erode your confidence for all subsequent field trips, unless gradually regained by good performance.

For example, Nikon Df is doing alright wrt the first one but failing considerably often wrt the second one.
 

drd1135

Zen Snapshooter
Location
Lexington, VA
Real Name
Steve
I've always used the car analogy. A car is a much bigger and more important purchase in terms of daily use than a camera. I rarely hear anyone say "a car is just a tool". I do hear them say "I really want the red one".
 
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Location
Switzerland
Real Name
Matt
He wrote well. I have occasionally used the phrase "user experience" (UX) to talk about the same idea. Usability of a tool is super important but once that's covered, UX steps in. It's like Maslow's hierarchy but for camera gear. :)

It was a tough pill to swallow but Leica M taught me it's not about the optimal image quality, it's about the UX that has to be 100% right to ultimately sustain the hobby.

Just two examples of what contributes to this UX, at least for myself personally:

- Autofocus on the field: fast, snappy, reliable, verifiable... does it feel you're getting the focus on the field, with the camera on your eye?
- Your prior experience of this camera nailing the focus (seen in post): you may shoot confidently on the field but then come back and see the focus is not alright even though the camera might have given you the green light. These failures will erode your confidence for all subsequent field trips, unless gradually regained by good performance.

For example, Nikon Df is doing alright wrt the first one but failing considerably often wrt the second one.
You know, reading this, I'd just reach for a :mu43: camera of the latest generation (one of the solid 20MP ones) and screw the 15mm f/1.7 on, done. My choice for something sufficient RF-like would still be the GX9. It nails focus every time I point it at something, has gorgeous image quality when combined with the 15mm (way better than it has any right to be), is small, light, fast and reliable. I don't say this to state one could forgo all other systems this way, but your description just fits that combo perfectly. Add the 12-32mm and 35-100mm (I know you own both lenses - or have owned them), and you have a kit that does exactly what you want while fitting in its entirety into two coat pockets (or comfortably into an ONA Bowery with space to spare). Except for the sub-par EVF, the GX9 still kills it when it comes to a solidly performing carry-around - if you don't need/want weather sealing, that is. Or take the LX100 II ... same sensor, just slightly cropped, same EVF with better(!) eye-relief (whatever were they thinking?!), very nice, fast zoom lens, very fluid once it's deployed (the latter is the issue that made me sell my original LX100 - slow on switch-on).

I'm not trying to be contrarian here, I'm just getting the impression that the bigger-better approach may not in fact address your actual demands ... I recall you owning the GX80. That's the camera you're actually describing (the GX9 just being a bit more refined, but essentially the same camera).

M.
 

drd1135

Zen Snapshooter
Location
Lexington, VA
Real Name
Steve
An APS-C version of the Fuji X30, kept to the size of the X-T2, with WR thrown in. And the glass must be fast, say f2.8-4. I'd be OK with reducing the FL somewhat to keep the size down. Say 28-75 or 90mm. Manual zoom only, like the X30. If Fuji could do that, such a camera would be my forever camera.
This really hits home lately. I bought this X20 a year ago on a lark but quickly misplaced the charger, leaving it to languish in my "storage" camera bag. In the meantime, I went through that period where I did the photo challenges with my collection of 12 mp Olympus Pens with very few limitations on my efforts. When I found the Fuji charger, I was excited to try the X20 and have been using it for the Day-to-Day challenge. Being a somewhat inexpensive used camera, I just tucked it in a pocket of my canvas "briefcase" with little thought to protection, so it's always there. It's not pants pocket-able, but jackets or any bag works fine.

Wow. My original experience with this series was the X10 with the Bayer sensor. The X20 has performed like a champ, the only drawback being the high ISO noise. It's a beautiful camera that produces excellent results for web posting applications. The lens is epic. 28-112 mme, f2-2.8. Compare it to the 24-120 mme f4 Fuji lens I have now and the size difference is astonishing. I like the Pens a lot, but the X20 is just a different level of user experience. I'd prefer an EVF, but this optical VF at least shows the f-stop and SS and, to be honest, I prefer the styling of the X20 over the X30. If I could get a modern BSI version of the 2/3 sensor I would buy that camera new today.

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mnhoj

gee aahrr
Location
Los Angeles
Real Name
John
I've always used the car analogy. A car is a much bigger and more important purchase in terms of daily use than a camera. I rarely hear anyone say "a car is just a tool". I do hear them say "I really want the red one".

I usually rate all items with a ratio of tool and toy.
My recent venture with the Canon RP for example.
A good portion more tool than toy and a good portion of the tool falling short.
On paper, it worked. In use, not as much.
No regrets - I'll try mostly anything once.

My Toyota Sienna is all tool, zero toy but does it's thing extremely well.

My incoming X-H1 looks to be quite a bit of both - very excited. :biggrin:
 

mike3996

Hall of Famer
Location
Finland
I'm not trying to be contrarian here, I'm just getting the impression that the bigger-better approach may not in fact address your actual demands ... I recall you owning the GX80. That's the camera you're actually describing (the GX9 just being a bit more refined, but essentially the same camera).
GX80 (or GX9 for that matter) has sufficiently poor EVF that I couldn't really take it as my primary camera. Cramped size too. I would in fact like it if Panasonic released a GX9 variant without the EVF.

But as a M4/3 system it's most wonderful since you can own, say, a GX800 (jacket pocket), GX80 (light carry) and G9 (full carry). Have use for each of them with shared lens catalogue.

I'm still on the fence wrt G9 so I just might stay put waiting for a GX10.

These cameras are not perfect so it slows my enthusiasm down.

The IQ is alright but Leica is just too much fun to be replaced. I get just mad good vibes relying on my instinct on what and where I left the focus. I have learned with Nikon and others that the instinct and the "focus memory" is not as strong when you BBF autofocus lenses. When shooting Leica or Nikon with the MF lenses, there's the instinct and I will now intuitively my focus is okay for far distance landscape without even adjusting.

That said, today was a lousy weather day and pretty gray to boot, I was thinking about G9's tremendous, cinema-size viewfinder perhaps showing me a high-contrast B/W preview. The WR of the camera doesn't hurt either.
 

drd1135

Zen Snapshooter
Location
Lexington, VA
Real Name
Steve
I usually rate all items with a ratio of tool and toy.
My recent venture with the Canon RP for example.
A good portion more tool than toy and a good portion of the tool falling short.
On paper, it worked. In use, not as much.
No regrets - I'll try mostly anything once.

My Toyota Sienna is all tool, zero toy but does it's thing extremely well.

My incoming X-H1 looks to be quite a bit of both - very excited. :biggrin:
I can definitely empathize. I have to wait a month for the new X-S10. Oops, I wasn’t suppose to reveal that yet. . .
 
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mike3996

Hall of Famer
Location
Finland
The last few days I've been stuck in a following circular dreaming:
Now I'm again at the "Mirrorless FF is great" phase of the cycle.

Of a big mirrorless camera I very much would like a FF sensor if for nothing else, for adapting SLR lenses without losing the character that lies on the edges of the image circle.

But meanwhile I've been thinking about G9 for its technical merits and Panasonic color and noise performance has been a close preference to me. Nikon color is not my favorite thing. Canon, Leica, Panasonic, these are the colors of my true love.

G9 (body only) is larger and heavier than Z6. The M4/3 zoom lenses are lighter but I wonder if I really need them in my photography. The then again M4/3 primes are so compact that G9's body size is overkill for them.

G9 probably has better IBIS but do I need more than 2-3 stops of stabilization when I also have a very world-class ISO performance.

G9's EVF is wonderful but Z6 doesn't come far in the specs. Optics on the Z6 may be worse but that is not something I can read on the internet.

Z6 has a proper tilty screen, not this fully articulating toy crap G9 has. I watched Jared Polin's feature-length Canon R5 review and was yet again reminded that FAS is not a feature that gives me any pleasure. On the other hand, Z6's tilty screen is perhaps limiting in vertical shooting situations which I do a lot. Fuji X-T3 would indeed have the best implementation.

G9 shoots a nice mechanical burst at 12 FPS (great for bracketing purposes) and Z6 is no slouch at 9 or 12 FPS depending on if you want 12 or 14 bit raws.

-------

The overall reason I desire Leica SL or Panasonic G9 over sensibly priced Nikon Z6 is that I know SL and G9 to have great software in them. Nikon Z6 is an unknown for me.

Street pricing places preowned G9's at roughly 50% of preowned Z6's.
 

mike3996

Hall of Famer
Location
Finland
Just so frustrating that every cool mirrorless camera offering has some minor things that prevent them from being obvious choices for me.

Leica SL: lack of IBIS, size, weight, expense.
Leica SL2: size, weight, big expense.
Nikon Z6: no blinkies in preview, minorly Nikon color.
Canon EOS R: no raw support in linux.
Panasonic S5: budget components, apparently loud shutter.
Panasonic G9: crop factor prevents full SLR lens adaptations, minor size considerations, question of usability or need.

The good thing is that I can just keep on riding the compromises and ultimately not choose anything.
 

Jonathan F/2

Top Veteran
Location
Los Angeles, USA
Just so frustrating that every cool mirrorless camera offering has some minor things that prevent them from being obvious choices for me.

Leica SL: lack of IBIS, size, weight, expense.
Leica SL2: size, weight, big expense.
Nikon Z6: no blinkies in preview, minorly Nikon color.
Canon EOS R: no raw support in linux.
Panasonic S5: budget components, apparently loud shutter.
Panasonic G9: crop factor prevents full SLR lens adaptations, minor size considerations, question of usability or need.

The good thing is that I can just keep on riding the compromises and ultimately not choose anything.
Haha, the best choice is to keep your money in your wallet! ;)

This is why I put the majority of my gear investment in glass. Deprecation is slower and I can either break even or make profit on the sale depending on demand.
 
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mike3996

Hall of Famer
Location
Finland
The last few days I have developed a real hankering for a consumer superzooms like Oly 14-150 or Panasonic 14-140. I am envisioning an Olympus OM-D E-M1.3 and Panasonic G9 to match these desires... 😎

Luckily my house hunting is also progressing and that will postpone all decisions by a few months at least.

Unluckily this house situation will ultimately leave me with much more spare cash so that might be very problematic, GAS-wise.
 

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