GAS GAS: Please Share your Latest Desires Big and Small

drd1135

Zen Snapshooter
Location
Virginia
Name
Steve
Interesting idea, I can see some use for it as such. Mostly to camouflage a suitable digital cameras in a "retro" environment, for those that partake in such. That on a brown and/or black and silver house with a thin leatherstrap should go a long way fitting in.

I have been informed that the PL 9 mm is in stock no earlier than October up here, so that is somewhat of a bummer. On the other hand, I am down to that and the Oly pancake 14-42mm on the "Want" list, so there is always that. Stumbled over rumours that the latter has the same cable band issues that the Oly 9-18mm has, so now am a bit leery towards it.

If I should add anything, I fancy something that is not made, a decent enough 12-40 pancake.

It should be in the vicinity of the PZ14-42 or even slightly more protuding collapsed, but no bigger in diameter. Power zoom optional, but I live well with a manual one. F-stops in true kit-form, 3.5 -5,6(ish). Preferably weathersealed and as light as possible, 46-52mm filter tread. Metal mount.
Just mentioning the pancake Lumix 12-32 3.5-5.6. It’s a surprisingly sharp for such a small light package, and are available for bargain prices. The construction is not going to win awards but the images might.
 

JensM

Top Veteran
Just mentioning the pancake Lumix 12-32 3.5-5.6. It’s a surprisingly sharp for such a small light package, and are available for bargain prices. The construction is not going to win awards but the images might.
Am aware of that little gem. I think I have four or five of them at the moment but it falls a tad short at the long end. I do tend to take one with me if I am out with one of the 14-something on the camera of the day, just for the 12 mm. It is when all is said and done just 70ish grams so hardly noticeable, but it comes along with it a lens-swap and those I am not too keen on in the wild, so to speak. I am getting somewhat good at wet cleaning M43 sensors.

All the other 12 mm zooms are way larger, between 210ish and 400ish grams and well protruding, and those are the most current designs, so a "return" to a unobtrusive little new design in true M43 form, would have been a nice change. :drinks:
 

John King

Member of SOFA
Location
Beaumaris, Melbourne, Australia
Name
John ...
Am aware of that little gem. I think I have four or five of them at the moment but it falls a tad short at the long end. I do tend to take one with me if I am out with one of the 14-something on the camera of the day, just for the 12 mm. It is when all is said and done just 70ish grams so hardly noticeable, but it comes along with it a lens-swap and those I am not too keen on in the wild, so to speak. I am getting somewhat good at wet cleaning M43 sensors.

All the other 12 mm zooms are way larger, between 210ish and 400ish grams and well protruding, and those are the most current designs, so a "return" to a unobtrusive little new design in true M43 form, would have been a nice change. :drinks:
Jens, it's why I like the Olympus 14-42 EZ with JJC auto-opening lens cap on my E-PM2. Not the world's greatest lens, but adequate and tiny (90 grams!).
 

JensM

Top Veteran
Jens, it's why I like the Olympus 14-42 EZ with JJC auto-opening lens cap on my E-PM2. Not the world's greatest lens, but adequate and tiny (90 grams!).
Thats is the one pancake that I am lacking for the moment, but it still is 14mm at the wide end, which it shares with the PZ 14-42, and why I am wishing for a 12-40 Pancake, it would be a very nice one lens for EDCing on a small body. :unsure:
 

Aviator

Rookie
Name
Arturo
I am in an interesting situation right now.

A few years back I was living in the Middle East, at that time I had a Panasonic Lumix GX8 with various lenses. For one reason or another I ended up selling the camera along a Lumix 42.5/1.7... The guy that bought my camera was a re-seller, he told me he was not really interested in the camera, he just wanted to sell it in his own shop and make a profit with it.

Shortly after that, Covid really hit the airline industry and I lost my job, I went back home, got a new job, etc... However, from from time to time the GX8 came to my mind, at times I was thinking "why did I sell this camera?, I kinda regret it" whereas sometimes my thoughts were more like "yeah, I remember this use to bother me on the GX8", "now that I have the G9/EM-5 everything is better"...

Well, I just moved back the Middle East, I rejoined the company I was working for before Covid, and guess what? To my surprise my old camera is still sitting in his shop almost in the exact condition I left it. It seems that he managed to sell the 42.5 lens, and now he is selling the GX8 paired with a 20/1.7 II... I think the camera has been sitting in his shop for ages now, simply because he's asking too much for it, I don't exactly remember for how much I sold the combo, but he is asking 789 USD (non negotiable) for the camera, the lens, the charger and two batteries (1 original and 1 generic spare that I had).

The thing is I really don't need the camera. I travelled back to the Middle East with 3 Micro 4/3s cameras and I'm very happy with them. But at the same time I have this sentimental attachment to my old GX8 because it was my first ever Micro 4/3s camera and it was a great camera!

If you were in my shoes, would you consider buying it back?
 

JensM

Top Veteran
I am in an interesting situation right now.

If you were in my shoes, would you consider buying it back?
Somewhere down the road, I will probably buy a GX7 and a GX8, which are the two M43 houses I have sold. But not for that sort of cash, I sold them off to "invest" in more current tech and lenses, while they still had a decent value. As the re-buy will be more for collection purposes than for actual use, I am waiting for them to reach reasonable price levels, on par with the other "obsolete" M43 cameraes.

I think a fair price for the GX8/20mm combo would be somewhere around the $450 range, possibly nudging a bit over based on it being a MkII version lens.
 
Location
Finland
I don't see any advantage in adding a D700 when you already have a Df, Mike.
I first used a D700 and then added a Df. I've kept the D700 because the AF was supposed to be better than that of the Df.
I never needed the D700 again.
Autofocus is the Df's greatest weakness. Ergonomics with large lenses another issue. These are the things I was looking for in a say D700. At the same time D700 is an old camera so it may not be reasonable to expect that good of an AF edge.

I should probably be looking at D750 or D810/850 if I ever decide to act on a body desire.
 

Bart J D

Hall of Famer
Autofocus is the Df's greatest weakness. Ergonomics with large lenses another issue. These are the things I was looking for in a say D700. At the same time D700 is an old camera so it may not be reasonable to expect that good of an AF edge.

I should probably be looking at D750 or D810/850 if I ever decide to act on a body desire.
I actually meant the AF of the Df hasn't let me down yet :) No need for anything "better".
I often use the 70-200 2.8 with this camera and also the 300 4.0 which I consider to be "large": I don't have anything larger.
My walk-around lens is the 24-70 2.8. In my view, this makes the Df a point and shoot :) or the Tamron 15-30 2.8. These lenses are not exactly light.
All of these handle just fine. I'll go out on a limb here and explain I hold weight of the set by the lens in my left hand and operate the camera itself with my right hand.
This makes using all of these combinations a breeze.
I have no idea if this way of handling is unusual but that is how I've always done it since I was 15. Ow, and a bodybuilder, I am not 😁
 
Location
Switzerland
Name
Matt
I actually meant the AF of the Df hasn't let me down yet :) No need for anything "better".
I often use the 70-200 2.8 with this camera and also the 300 4.0 which I consider to be "large": I don't have anything larger.
My walk-around lens is the 24-70 2.8. In my view, this makes the Df a point and shoot :) or the Tamron 15-30 2.8. These lenses are not exactly light.
All of these handle just fine. I'll go out on a limb here and explain I hold weight of the set by the lens in my left hand and operate the camera itself with my right hand.
This makes using all of these combinations a breeze.
I have no idea if this way of handling is unusual but that is how I've always done it since I was 15. Ow, and a bodybuilder, I am not 😁
It's definitely all in the eyes of the beholder - if you're coming from a D700, a Df will feel svelte, but if you're used to something like a Leica M or smaller, it'll feel a bit bulky. If you're used to a D750 (as I was when I first got to handle a Df), the lack of a pronounced grip will feel off. And if you're used to carrying cameras on a strap and/or by the lens, a Df, even with one of the bulkier zooms, will not feel overly heavy because it objectively isn't (again, especially when coming from a D700), but if you like carrying cameras "by the body" (i.e. - at least in my case - in the right hand, dangling or otherwise), a Df with 24-70 (Nikon or Tamron/Sigma? There's quite a big difference) will feel really unwieldy.

Which reminds me that once upon a time, I had planned on doing a kind of overview of how to carry a camera in hand ... not that it mattered to many people, but what kind of grip a camera feels comfortable with *is* important to me personally. And I remember *not* really finding a way to grip the Df without it feeling either very uncomfortable or unsafe. But that's definitely just me - because I walk around with the camera in the (right) hand, no straps (apart from a wrist strap if necessary and/or applicable). Of course, I will use neck straps with bigger lenses, but only reluctantly (if possible, I prefer carrying a bag or backpack to put the camera in in such a case).

Again, what works how well will completely depend on your habits and preferences. That said, I'd never expect a D700 to outdo a Df anyway - except maybe in terms of Af, and then only maybe; the D700 is a great body, but really big and heavy, too, so carrying *it* will not be any nicer over time than carrying the Df. However, the D750 still holds the crown of most comfortable Nikon body *in the hand* when it comes to DSLRs; I've even walked around with the 70-200mm f/4G on it in hand - not too big a deal (if you can put it into the backpack from time to time if it gets too heavy). The D750 is a very, very well thought out camera indeed - nothing special, but almost everything eminently usable.

But the Df's mix of great sensor and really pretty compact body is still unique and enticing in its own way. Ever since owning the Z fc (which is kind of a spiritual successor to the Df), I've had flashes of wanting to try the Df again. But then, I also get that with the M10-R and M11 - and it all goes away again pretty quickly ...

M.
 

MountainMan79

😎💩➡️📸
Location
Minnesota
Name
Chris
It's definitely all in the eyes of the beholder - if you're coming from a D700, a Df will feel svelte, but if you're used to something like a Leica M or smaller, it'll feel a bit bulky. If you're used to a D750 (as I was when I first got to handle a Df), the lack of a pronounced grip will feel off. And if you're used to carrying cameras on a strap and/or by the lens, a Df, even with one of the bulkier zooms, will not feel overly heavy because it objectively isn't (again, especially when coming from a D700), but if you like carrying cameras "by the body" (i.e. - at least in my case - in the right hand, dangling or otherwise), a Df with 24-70 (Nikon or Tamron/Sigma? There's quite a big difference) will feel really unwieldy.

Which reminds me that once upon a time, I had planned on doing a kind of overview of how to carry a camera in hand ... not that it mattered to many people, but what kind of grip a camera feels comfortable with *is* important to me personally. And I remember *not* really finding a way to grip the Df without it feeling either very uncomfortable or unsafe. But that's definitely just me - because I walk around with the camera in the (right) hand, no straps (apart from a wrist strap if necessary and/or applicable). Of course, I will use neck straps with bigger lenses, but only reluctantly (if possible, I prefer carrying a bag or backpack to put the camera in in such a case).

Again, what works how well will completely depend on your habits and preferences. That said, I'd never expect a D700 to outdo a Df anyway - except maybe in terms of Af, and then only maybe; the D700 is a great body, but really big and heavy, too, so carrying *it* will not be any nicer over time than carrying the Df. However, the D750 still holds the crown of most comfortable Nikon body *in the hand* when it comes to DSLRs; I've even walked around with the 70-200mm f/4G on it in hand - not too big a deal (if you can put it into the backpack from time to time if it gets too heavy). The D750 is a very, very well thought out camera indeed - nothing special, but almost everything eminently usable.

But the Df's mix of great sensor and really pretty compact body is still unique and enticing in its own way. Ever since owning the Z fc (which is kind of a spiritual successor to the Df), I've had flashes of wanting to try the Df again. But then, I also get that with the M10-R and M11 - and it all goes away again pretty quickly ...

M.
Agree with pretty much all of this. I have a half case on my Df and the ergonomics are mildly improved. I have also opted for the very nice Nikon 24-85 (although not weather sealed) as my everyday lens on the camera, as it’s much more compact than any 2.8 and fits the camera perfectly imho.
 
Location
Switzerland
Name
Matt
Agree with pretty much all of this. I have a half case on my Df and the ergonomics are mildly improved. I have also opted for the very nice Nikon 24-85 (although not weather sealed) as my everyday lens on the camera, as it’s much more compact than any 2.8 and fits the camera perfectly imho.
That's a lens that, in spite of its modest specs, has almost made it into my kit a few times. However, I tried the 28-105mm D first (it can be had at about half the price of the 24-85mm used) and like that lens so much that it ended my search for a portable walk-around companion for the D750. It's really versatile (semi-macro capabilities) and optically much nicer than a kit lens has any right to be (but I've read that that's the case for the 24-85mm, too). That said, I still use my former go-to lens, the 60mm G Micro, almost as much - it pairs with the D750 fantastically well and the whole combo ends up with some weather-restistance, too ...

M.
 
For some reason or the other I've been eyeballing a Nikkor AF 28-105 f/3.5-4.5 D from a local private seller lately. Yes, I don't have any Nikon bodies to go with it, but they are aplenty on the used market. The same seller has a D700, that could be nice... Then again, why not get a D810 instead...

And to be frank, I have zero use for such things. I don't even know how much I would eventually shoot with such a thing, since when I do get out, I'm there for the photography, not to play with gear. But some nostalgia keeps me wanting for a mirror-slapper of some sorts... My dad bought an F100 when it was introduced with that exact lens when I was 16 or 17. And guess who it was that used that combo the most? Yep, guilty as charged, even though I had my F90x and a bunch of lenses for it.

I keep repressing this boyhood nostalgia, but I can't make it go away...
 

MountainMan79

😎💩➡️📸
Location
Minnesota
Name
Chris
That's a lens that, in spite of its modest specs, has almost made it into my kit a few times. However, I tried the 28-105mm D first (it can be had at about half the price of the 24-85mm used) and like that lens so much that it ended my search for a portable walk-around companion for the D750. It's really versatile (semi-macro capabilities) and optically much nicer than a kit lens has any right to be (but I've read that that's the case for the 24-85mm, too). That said, I still use my former go-to lens, the 60mm G Micro, almost as much - it pairs with the D750 fantastically well and the whole combo ends up with some weather-restistance, too ...

M.
Yup, the 24-85 is far and away the nicest “kit” lens I’ve ever used. It really shouldn’t even be considered an entry level lens. Quality is great throughout the range and the sun stars are beautiful. It’s just a balancing act of size/weather sealing…something always has to give.
 
Location
Oregon Coast
Name
Andrew
I have a $100 B&H gift card which is not exactly burning a hole in my pocket, but is something I keep noticing sitting on my desk and saying "oh yeah, there's that." I had a couple of ideas for what to do with it.
  • I could use it to pay almost half of a graphics card upgrade for my PC, which has an ancient Nvidia 750 Ti. Now that cards are finally coming down in price, there are GTX 1660 Super cards for under $250, tempting for the GPU rendering in DXO software. I don't play many PC games as I have an Xbox console and prefer the couch when I am going to play a game. Although Age of Empires is on PC, and I do love that series.
  • I could invest in another 100' roll of 35mm film. I'm only about halfway through my bulk roll of Fomapan 200, and I have a good selection of B&W rolls as well. So not a big priority at this point. I could buy one of the daylight bulk rollers for about $52, which would definitely make rolling the rest of my current bulk film go easier, but I have heard these are sometimes a bit janky.
  • I could always take $100 off a lens or other equipment purchase. But the lenses I want are usually considerably cheaper on the used market (and cheaper than B&H's used prices).
  • Or, I could pay for about 2/3 of the Ars Imago Lab-Box developer. I have a double Paterson tank with 2 reels, so it's not like I don't already have what I need for developing. However, I've seen some videos which make the Lab-Box compelling in its simplicity and the time it cuts down from the peripheral parts of the development process. Also, it can be used in daylight. Not taking the time to black out the edges of my bathroom door for loading the film reels would be mighty nice. One can simply use a film leader retriever to pull out the edge of the film (or stop when rerolling it in-camera before the leader disappears inside), attach the edge of the film to the clip, put the lid on and wind. All can be done in daylight. It can be used with the continuous rotation method, but that's not supposed to be good with Rodinal (which I have a lot of), alternatively you can use extra developer and do a normal intermittent agitation method. I'd want to double check that the box can work for semi-stand since I'm likely to use that method in the future. I'm leaning towards this purchase. I could probably box up my Paterson kit and find an aspiring film developer to purchase it inexpensively, if I end up not needing to keep it.
 
Location
Switzerland
Name
Matt
I have a $100 B&H gift card which is not exactly burning a hole in my pocket, but is something I keep noticing sitting on my desk and saying "oh yeah, there's that." I had a couple of ideas for what to do with it.
  • I could use it to pay almost half of a graphics card upgrade for my PC, which has an ancient Nvidia 750 Ti. Now that cards are finally coming down in price, there are GTX 1660 Super cards for under $250, tempting for the GPU rendering in DXO software. I don't play many PC games as I have an Xbox console and prefer the couch when I am going to play a game. Although Age of Empires is on PC, and I do love that series.
  • I could invest in another 100' roll of 35mm film. I'm only about halfway through my bulk roll of Fomapan 200, and I have a good selection of B&W rolls as well. So not a big priority at this point. I could buy one of the daylight bulk rollers for about $52, which would definitely make rolling the rest of my current bulk film go easier, but I have heard these are sometimes a bit janky.
  • I could always take $100 off a lens or other equipment purchase. But the lenses I want are usually considerably cheaper on the used market (and cheaper than B&H's used prices).
  • Or, I could pay for about 2/3 of the Ars Imago Lab-Box developer. I have a double Paterson tank with 2 reels, so it's not like I don't already have what I need for developing. However, I've seen some videos which make the Lab-Box compelling in its simplicity and the time it cuts down from the peripheral parts of the development process. Also, it can be used in daylight. Not taking the time to black out the edges of my bathroom door for loading the film reels would be mighty nice. One can simply use a film leader retriever to pull out the edge of the film (or stop when rerolling it in-camera before the leader disappears inside), attach the edge of the film to the clip, put the lid on and wind. All can be done in daylight. It can be used with the continuous rotation method, but that's not supposed to be good with Rodinal (which I have a lot of), alternatively you can use extra developer and do a normal intermittent agitation method. I'd want to double check that the box can work for semi-stand since I'm likely to use that method in the future. I'm leaning towards this purchase. I could probably box up my Paterson kit and find an aspiring film developer to purchase it inexpensively, if I end up not needing to keep it.
+1 for the Lab-Box - I own one, and it takes the fiddling out of loading the tank; since I was an early backer, mine also came with the "deluxe" lid that incorporates a thermometer and a timer ... But those two aren't really necessary if you're already settled on that front. Way smoother workflow, less "o-oh" moments ...

M.
 
Location
Oregon Coast
Name
Andrew
+1 for the Lab-Box - I own one, and it takes the fiddling out of loading the tank; since I was an early backer, mine also came with the "deluxe" lid that incorporates a thermometer and a timer ... But those two aren't really necessary if you're already settled on that front. Way smoother workflow, less "o-oh" moments ...

M.
I'm glad you mentioned still being happy with it, I remember you acquired one fairly early on. It seems there is both a learning curve, and some inconsistencies, but most of the latter seem to be with the 120 module. The design seems to play a bit better with 135.
 
Location
Switzerland
Name
Matt
I'm glad you mentioned still being happy with it, I remember you acquired one fairly early on. It seems there is both a learning curve, and some inconsistencies, but most of the latter seem to be with the 120 module. The design seems to play a bit better with 135.
It works for both formats (120 and 135) - but of course it's easier to work with 135. If you operate the film clip accurately, there's virtually nothing that can go wrong (except for botching the chemistry, but ... well, you knew that). That said, working slowly and methodically when setting things up more or less prevents failure with 120 as well.

I haven't done a lot development lately - but the Lab-Box wasn't the reason for that.

M.
 
Location
Oregon Coast
Name
Andrew
I went into Blue Moon Camera in Portland over the weekend and they had the Pentax FA Limited 1.9/43mm SMC in their cabinet. I put it on my K1 and took some shots, and even just reviewing them on the rear screen I could tell they looked very good. I didn't buy it ($400 wasn't bad but not the best deal to be found on that lens, I'd probably check Pentax Forums first), but I'm severely tempted. It's a faster and quieter focusing lens than the FA 2/35mm, and produces sharper images at wider apertures. Even though the FA 35mm is a new, HD version, it behaves a lot like an older lens, because I believe all the internals are older. And the images, while good, still have the look of a lens that was designed for film, with a little more softness and CA. I suspect if I bought the 43, it would essentially replace the 35 because they would be close enough in focal length that I usually wouldn't want to shoot with the 35. Only issue is, it furthers my tendency to purchase all my lenses in the 40mm general vicinity, and that limits the versatility of my kit. I haven't decided yet whether I am okay with that or not. It's not the best dollar-for-dollar lens buying strategy, but it also makes me happy when I get lenses like the 43 -- it reminds me of a full frame version of what the Panasonic 20mm is to M4/3 -- so, which is better, versatility or happiness? 😏
 
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