GAS GAS: Please Share your Latest Desires Big and Small

The Q2 is nice but the M9 has that sweet sensor. I look to the camera for image and I do the heavy lifting with content. I have an M8.2 that is great for B&W and a couple of M240's that are OK. But Leicaland for me is the M9 and the Cooke. This is an example of that magic: L1002650 The Cooke has a glow and the M9 CCD is good for color. I stocked up with M9 batteries so hopefully I will be fine as long as I want to use the M9. I just have to learn how to take better photos. It is so much like sailing. You can learn to sail in half a day. Just don't run the pointed end into anything harder than it is. And then spend the rest of your life trying to get good at sailing.
 

William Lewis

Top Veteran
Location
Eau Claire, Wisconsin
Name
William Lewis
Leica-land? If you really want to understand the Leica "thing" find an early prewar uncoated Summitar and run some medium speed (50 ~ 125 ISO) B&W film behind it. An uncoated Tessar or Sonnar is even better, but that lens was Leica's finest moment.

My opinion, yada-yada-yada & several beers in me.
 
Location
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Name
Miguel Tejada-Flores
It's not a serious desire, because I'm far, far away from considering Leica limited editions, but the new Hodinkee collab is pretty. Like, really good looking.


Definitely on the tempting side, have to agee with you, Andrew.
Maybe it's time to plot another bank robbery. Or, that failing, to sell off a few million shares of crypto. Where there's a will, there's a way ;)
 
Leica-land? If you really want to understand the Leica "thing" find an early prewar uncoated Summitar and run some medium speed (50 ~ 125 ISO) B&W film behind it. An uncoated Tessar or Sonnar is even better, but that lens was Leica's finest moment.

My opinion, yada-yada-yada & several beers in me.
I did shoot some rolls in '57 with an old IIIf. I liked it. But I do not do film, period. I have some old KMZ Jupiters which are pretty much pre-war Sonnars. And some old Canons. I like the old lenses. The new computer designed super sharp, super bright just do not do it for me. But film, no.
 

William Lewis

Top Veteran
Location
Eau Claire, Wisconsin
Name
William Lewis
I did shoot some rolls in '57 with an old IIIf. I liked it. But I do not do film, period. I have some old KMZ Jupiters which are pretty much pre-war Sonnars. And some old Canons. I like the old lenses. The new computer designed super sharp, super bright just do not do it for me. But film, no.
That's fine. I like both digital and film these days. I'm waiting on an order of Ilford XP2 120 to run through my Super Ikonta 6x45 and Rolleicord III because they can give me something that even my Leica M 240 can't. I have no words for it but black and white film, a Tessar, a yellow filter & a beautiful day's light can't be captured by any sensor that doesn't use silver halides :jedi:
 
That's fine. I like both digital and film these days. I'm waiting on an order of Ilford XP2 120 to run through my Super Ikonta 6x45 and Rolleicord III because they can give me something that even my Leica M 240 can't. I have no words for it but black and white film, a Tessar, a yellow filter & a beautiful day's light can't be captured by any sensor that doesn't use silver halides :jedi:
I have had good luck with the M8.2 using the JPG B&W option. It works very well with an old Canon 28mm f/2.8. Leica M8.2, Canon 28mm LTM f/2.8, f/5.6. It's a great camera - lens combo. The Peacock, retired pilot boat. Leica M8.2, Canon 28mm, f/2,8, f/5.6, 1/1000, ISO 160 L5010398 - Two old hulls awaiting scrapping.

I have a Pixii which is able to do magic and produce B&W RAW files but I cannot find any of them readily, luckily for you. ;o) And I will spare you a search and posting. Cheers
 
I post this because I am just so damned pleased with the X2D. It does all I had ever hoped a camera would do, and more. At risk of sounding like and grating, rusty old wheel, the dynamic range, color and detail are amazing to me. And while I can run it full auto for fine pics there is enough to be done manually to keep my feeble brain overtaxed for the rest of my days. Here is a flattering but yet honest review: Hasselblad X2D 100C Hands-on Review: The ultimate imaging machine in the right situation (Updated) If I could have one wish it would be that everybody here who wanted one would have one.
 
Location
Oregon Coast
Name
Andrew
I post this because I am just so damned pleased with the X2D. It does all I had ever hoped a camera would do, and more. At risk of sounding like and grating, rusty old wheel, the dynamic range, color and detail are amazing to me. And while I can run it full auto for fine pics there is enough to be done manually to keep my feeble brain overtaxed for the rest of my days. Here is a flattering but yet honest review: Hasselblad X2D 100C Hands-on Review: The ultimate imaging machine in the right situation (Updated) If I could have one wish it would be that everybody here who wanted one would have one.
I totally get what you mean, upgrading to a larger sensor format, especially when the image processing pipeline is modern and well-matched, does have a pleasure and excitement all its own. Even on a lesser level, moving from shooting M4/3 for so long to an APS-C Ricoh GR III gave me a bit of that sense, and then the Pentax K-1 II even more so. The below image isn't an exciting one by any means, but the subtlety in shadow, light transitions and colors is just so pleasing to me, especially since it required absolutely minimal PP. I can imagine the X2D is like another level of that.

52480482393_00379d4c82_k.jpg
IMGP1776_DxO by Andrew Lossing, on Flickr
 
I totally get what you mean, upgrading to a larger sensor format, especially when the image processing pipeline is modern and well-matched, does have a pleasure and excitement all its own. Even on a lesser level, moving from shooting M4/3 for so long to an APS-C Ricoh GR III gave me a bit of that sense, and then the Pentax K-1 II even more so. The below image isn't an exciting one by any means, but the subtlety in shadow, light transitions and colors is just so pleasing to me, especially since it required absolutely minimal PP. I can imagine the X2D is like another level of that.

View attachment 348225IMGP1776_DxO by Andrew Lossing, on Flickr
To somehow impart the moment we saw. And we are lucky that like horseshoes, close counts. I suppose we could liken our photography efforts to artillery. We fire for range, getting closer and closer until we have it and then "fire for effect." It is so satisfying to come away with a photo and say, "Yeah, that's what I meant." When we are on our game a Dandelion or a bug can be elegant.
 
We have a photo gallery in our small town. It has been moribund the last couple of years due to the pandemic and accompanying slack economy. But it has somehow soldiered on. The owner has vowed to start up meetings again, at least once a month. In the past they were fun, a get-together of local electron wasters such as myself to chat, show and critique our efforts. It requires membership, US$300 per annum, which is almost worth it and helps the gallery stay afloat. The owner does some nice work with prints.

When we start back up on December 7th, a better day for us that for those in Pearl Harbor I hope, I plan on bringing in a USB with images off an old Sony DSC S70, then next time an old Lumix Z3, then an old Pentax Q-S1 and slowly work my way up the line. As the cameras have gotten more sophisticated I hope to be able to show what I have done with them has grown more sophisticated, too. Anyway it will be fun to see the other folks and see what they have been doing. We are social animals.
 
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