GAS GAS: Please Share your Latest Desires Big and Small

It's probably also a personality thing. I cannot get into something in earnest and not want to explore it extensively . . .
Yep. I was once that way about camera gear. After a couple of deep purges, I have kept the urges in check and have been more judicious in my gear acquisitions. In previous decades I was long into r/c airplanes and aerial photography; talk about a $$$ black hole! When I became interested in ukuleles, I knew I wanted to take my passion for woodworking and build my own. That entry point has led to much experimentation and many hundreds of hours in the shop. The last week or so I have been laying the groundwork for #16, working on the layout drawings and updating my building jigs. Every ukulele I've built has been different in some way from all the others, and this one will be even more of a departure from the norm.
 
Last edited:
Yep. I was once that way about camera gear. After a couple of deep purges, I have kept the urges in check and have been more judicious in my gear acquisitions. In previous decades I was long into r/c airplanes and aerial photography; talk about a $$$ black hole! When I became interested in ukuleles, I knew I wanted to take my passion for woodworking and build my own. That entry point has led to much experimentation and many hundreds of hours in the shop. The last week or so I have been laying the groundwork for #16, working on the layout drawings and updating my building jigs. Every ukulele I've built has been different in some way than all the others, and this one will be even more of a departure from the norm.
Tony, if I ever arrive at a state of affairs that can be called serene, I'll dare ask you for an instrument built by you - you can always say no, but I'll stay absolute fascinated by your skill as well as the results! In the meantime, I'll try to become at least some kind of real player - at the moment, I'm just perpetuating incompetence (lack of time, but also other musical projects that require my existing skills, however limited, on other instruments). All the best with your new project!

M.
 
what happened with saxophones and tin whistles was interesting: There was a point when I obviously felt I had (at least) what I wanted and needed, and it has since stayed pretty much that way (in fact, I'm considering selling some instruments in due course - but it'll be somewhat tough to decide which ones).
I'm an aficionado of tin whistles/Irish pennywhistles, and when I was younger I was pretty good. I like to think the skills are still in there, though my fingers would need some limbering up before I could play as before. Now where are those Susato whistles?
 
Thinking about the Olympus 8-25 f4 again. Currently have 12-100 f4 and panny 15. At times Would like a little wider since shooting more landscape now. Decisions, decisions.
It's brilliant for ultra wide landscapes.

_M299800-86.jpg
Join to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


Cross posted in my thread on the f/4 8-25, here:

 
This is a desire for something non-existent, but I wish for a Panasonic LX100 Mark III. I would probably be interested in a Mark II but they are nearly impossible to find, and I don't want to pay $1K for one.

While I am at it, an improved lens that's slightly sharper at further distances and some improved sensor dust resistance would be nice as well.
 
Thinking about the Olympus 8-25 f4 again. Currently have 12-100 f4 and panny 15. At times Would like a little wider since shooting more landscape now. Decisions, decisions.
I've heard but not experienced how great the 12-100 is, but the 8-25 was a lot of fun when I rented it for a trip earlier this year. The small size makes it so great for long hikes and travel.

For me, after renting a Z6II to see if switching from MFT to FF would be right for me, I think I'm going to start saving for a Z8. I can only hope that the hypothetical Z6III release will save me, but the Z8 will probably win.
 
Less about desires, but certainly things appealing to me:

I have to say that I like the style as well as the direction Artra Lab's lenses are representing:
  • The Lunaelumen 50mm f/1.1 in Z mount would give me the optics of the always interesting Dr. Ding 50mm f/1.1 in native Z mount - vintage style, but with better contrast and sharpness.
  • The whimsically named Nonikkor 35mm f/1.4 and 24mm f/1.7 lenses would suit my Z f and Z fc, respectively, and, while heavy (glass and metal!), they're really quite compact.
Irene's work with the little TTArtisan 35mm f/1.4 has only strengthened my hunch that I'd have a lot of fun with these lenses. However, the "fly in the ointment" is that I'm pretty much set up with Voigtländer lenses (Nokton 40mm f/1.2 for the Z f, Nokton 23mm f/1.2 and APO-Ultron 35mm f/2 for the Z fc), alongside more manual lenses. I even own the Voigtländer Nokton 50mm f/1.2 in M mount which I could adapt (and not lose anything - the Artra Lab lenses are not electronically coupled, either). So, the Artra Lab lenses would definitely be redundant in most ways in my kit. But I had the trio in the basket twice already, so, you never know ... At least the Nonikkors bring something special to the table, and by all accounts, they're really well made.

Another thing that's keeps popping into my mind is the Leica M10-R. With my M Typ 262 temporarily gone (at least I hope that it's only temporarily), the call's grown louder, not least because of the work I see by people who use M10-Rs and M11s. Again, between my Leica M10 and my Z bodies, I'm not missing anything really, but the M10-R stands as the last of the classic Ms (warts and all), while the M11 and M11-P are definitely exploring new territory. Leica, to me, will always be something (also) driven by nostalgia (alongside the desire for simplicity as well as compactness); I really don't want a Leica to be a technological powerhouse*. But it appears that the M10-R neatly bridges the gap as an M10-P with a higher-resolution sensor.

My Leica dealer has a mint one for a fair price, too, which doesn't help at all.

I'll wait for Leica to tell me what I'll have to invest into the M Typ 262 - and if that camera is coming back (almost certainly, but not at all cost), it'll be pretty easy to hold down the wish for a M10-R.

M.

*This may change if they ever decide to provide a M with I.B.I.S., though.
 
I'm wishing for another compact camera for those times where I don't want to carry a lot of gear on my flight bag. My ideal kit (focal length wise) when I'm flying is the EM-5 III/Pen-F combined with the 12-40/2.8 and 35-100/2.8, but even if I consider this kit "small" and perfect on vacation, on a layover it is not always a practical combination, because as I said, it takes a lot of space on my already crowded flight bag and swapping lenses on the flight deck is not always practical.

My experience with the Pentax MX-1 regarding image quality has been successful, the lens on that camera is extremely sharp wide open at all focal lengths, the 1/1.7 sensor definitely delivers all the way to ISO 800, it has decent IBIS, and when you combine it with DXO Deep Prime there is nothing to complaint. I really like the tiltable screen, and I much prefer it to a fully retractable one.

I just have two minor gripes with it.
1. No EVF (I like to use a viewfinder to compose)
2. It is impossible to set a back focus button.

For those reasons I'm considering the following compact cameras:

1. Olympus Stylus 1 (12MP, 1/1.7 sensor, 28-300mm, nice constant F2.8 lens, nice EVF, I like the camera design, and I just like and trust Olympus)
2. Lumix TZ-100 (20MP, 1 inch sensor, 25-250mm F2.8-5.9, crappy EVF but at least is there, it is the newest model on this list)
3. Fujifilm X20/X30 (12MP, 2/3 sensor, 28-112mm F2-2.8, 85% coverage OVF for the X20, nice EVF for X30, I like the fact that the lens is actually a manual zoom instead of a power zoom, I like the design of the camera)

Another possibility that crossed my mind would be to get the pancake Lumix 12-32 3.5-5.6 and the Lumix 35-100 4-5.6 and mount them on the EM-5 III/Pen-F or even GX8 and forget about the compact cameras altogether.

Any experiences or suggestions?
Decisions, decisions...
 
I'm wishing for another compact camera for those times where I don't want to carry a lot of gear on my flight bag. My ideal kit (focal length wise) when I'm flying is the EM-5 III/Pen-F combined with the 12-40/2.8 and 35-100/2.8, but even if I consider this kit "small" and perfect on vacation, on a layover it is not always a practical combination, because as I said, it takes a lot of space on my already crowded flight bag and swapping lenses on the flight deck is not always practical.

My experience with the Pentax MX-1 regarding image quality has been successful, the lens on that camera is extremely sharp wide open at all focal lengths, the 1/1.7 sensor definitely delivers all the way to ISO 800, it has decent IBIS, and when you combine it with DXO Deep Prime there is nothing to complaint. I really like the tiltable screen, and I much prefer it to a fully retractable one.

I just have two minor gripes with it.
1. No EVF (I like to use a viewfinder to compose)
2. It is impossible to set a back focus button.

For those reasons I'm considering the following compact cameras:

1. Olympus Stylus 1 (12MP, 1/1.7 sensor, 28-300mm, nice constant F2.8 lens, nice EVF, I like the camera design, and I just like and trust Olympus)
2. Lumix TZ-100 (20MP, 1 inch sensor, 25-250mm F2.8-5.9, crappy EVF but at least is there, it is the newest model on this list)
3. Fujifilm X20/X30 (12MP, 2/3 sensor, 28-112mm F2-2.8, 85% coverage OVF for the X20, nice EVF for X30, I like the fact that the lens is actually a manual zoom instead of a power zoom, I like the design of the camera)

Another possibility that crossed my mind would be to get the pancake Lumix 12-32 3.5-5.6 and the Lumix 35-100 4-5.6 and mount them on the EM-5 III/Pen-F or even GX8 and forget about the compact cameras altogether.

Any experiences or suggestions?
Decisions, decisions...
I am a pilot as well, I carry a small LLBean (discrete) pack with a camera insert, I gave up trying to keep things in my kitbag, plus I need something while walking a city, thus the backpack. I tend to bring either the OM-5(previously the EM5.3) or the E-P7 along with my Leica M11-P. The Leica mount lenses adapt to the Olympus body thus giving me a mini telephoto. MFT Lens choices change per trip but a stalwart is the Olympus 14-150 or the 12-45 Pro, it just depends and there are many times I will even take the 14-42EZ. I will also bring a prime or two such as the Laowa 10/2 for wide and the 17/1.8 for a normal view. All are small, light and compact. If you want to keep something in your bag, go with the E-P7 and the 14-42EZ (or the Panasonic 12-32) along with the Panasonic 35-100/4-5.6 which is super tiny and light weight as you mentioned. Another intriguing lens that I have never tried but would like to is the Panasonic 45-175/4-5.6. There is also the Panasonic 12-60 kit lens that can be had for cheap and is really quite good. If you can get along without an EVF, I would highly recommend the E-P7, it is smaller than the EM5.3 with just as good image quality, plus it has a nice built in fill flash. Good luck with your decision!
 
I'm wishing for another compact camera for those times where I don't want to carry a lot of gear on my flight bag. My ideal kit (focal length wise) when I'm flying is the EM-5 III/Pen-F combined with the 12-40/2.8 and 35-100/2.8, but even if I consider this kit "small" and perfect on vacation, on a layover it is not always a practical combination, because as I said, it takes a lot of space on my already crowded flight bag and swapping lenses on the flight deck is not always practical.

My experience with the Pentax MX-1 regarding image quality has been successful, the lens on that camera is extremely sharp wide open at all focal lengths, the 1/1.7 sensor definitely delivers all the way to ISO 800, it has decent IBIS, and when you combine it with DXO Deep Prime there is nothing to complaint. I really like the tiltable screen, and I much prefer it to a fully retractable one.

I just have two minor gripes with it.
1. No EVF (I like to use a viewfinder to compose)
2. It is impossible to set a back focus button.

For those reasons I'm considering the following compact cameras:

1. Olympus Stylus 1 (12MP, 1/1.7 sensor, 28-300mm, nice constant F2.8 lens, nice EVF, I like the camera design, and I just like and trust Olympus)
2. Lumix TZ-100 (20MP, 1 inch sensor, 25-250mm F2.8-5.9, crappy EVF but at least is there, it is the newest model on this list)
3. Fujifilm X20/X30 (12MP, 2/3 sensor, 28-112mm F2-2.8, 85% coverage OVF for the X20, nice EVF for X30, I like the fact that the lens is actually a manual zoom instead of a power zoom, I like the design of the camera)

Another possibility that crossed my mind would be to get the pancake Lumix 12-32 3.5-5.6 and the Lumix 35-100 4-5.6 and mount them on the EM-5 III/Pen-F or even GX8 and forget about the compact cameras altogether.

Any experiences or suggestions?
Decisions, decisions...

I've used both the Olympus Stylus 1 ands the Fujifilm X30.
The Stylus 1 is fun and seems like a miniature Olympus E-M1, with a fixed lens and, of course, a much smaller sensor. I enjoyed it quite a bit but ultimately couldn't quite 'gel' with it. The X30 on the other hand is, for me (and I have subjective and eclectic personal preferences about cameras) THE nicest small-sensor smallish camera I have ever owned and used. The manual zoom is a huge plus. The camera design appeals to me. And the EVF, while on the small side, is eminently useful All in all, the camera never ceases to surprise and delight me - and in the years I've owned and used it, has never let me down once. (Only one weak point - a flimsy plastic door which opens on the bottom of the camera, for both SD card and battery. You have to be careful with the door so as not to damage or break it.) One other cool thing about the X30 - it has two very useful (and very functional) 'Macro' modes - both an ordinary 'macro' and a 'super macro' - which allow the camera to take quite extreme closeups.
A final point is that the camera comes with several built-in Fuji simulations - including 'Classic Chrome', which is one of my favorite all-time color profiles - so much so that most of the time, I shoot with the camera on a jpeg-Classic-Chrome setting.

Hope this helps, Arturo.
 
#Aviator: I’ve owned the X10, 20, and 30 and they are some of my favorite cameras. The sensor is one of the larger small sensors and the images are pleasing. The real jewel of these cameras is the lens. Fast and pretty sharp with a nice zoom range. Since it goes up to a 112 mm equivalent, you can get away without cropping, which is important with a small 12mp sensor. In a purely subjective observation, they are some of the nicest cameras to use. The X10 was my gateway drug to Fuji cameras. :ROFLMAO:
I also had the Stylus. If you want that zoom range, it was also a nice camera to use. The sensor was smaller and not quite as clean as the X10/20/30, but with modern noise reduction software, all of these cameras will produce cleaner images with regard to noise.
 
I'm wishing for another compact camera for those times where I don't want to carry a lot of gear on my flight bag.

Another possibility that crossed my mind would be to get the pancake Lumix 12-32 3.5-5.6 and the Lumix 35-100 4-5.6 and mount them on the EM-5 III/Pen-F or even GX8 and forget about the compact cameras altogether.

Any experiences or suggestions?
Decisions, decisions...
Of the ones mentioned, I have the Stylus, the X20 and the two Lumix lenses. I also have a TZ70 so am somewhat familiar with the TZ series, if not the 1" sensor.

For what I gather you are after, the Stylus seems to be the place to be, it really is very, very nice camera and it also shares batteries with the EM-5MkIII. Next would be the Lumix matched pair zooms, they really are a splendid pair of lenses and delivers results far above their weight class, and then the Fujifilm. It is nice, but somewhat "odd". I have one, mostly because I got a good deal on one and was a bit intrigued on the Fujifilm cameras.

Unless something ground breaking happened between the 70 and the 100, I would stay off that. I have quite a few Lumix cameras, and the only one I have taken an active dislike to is the TZ70.

One camera that you could look into is the Lumix LF-1, it is a truly compact camera with and was a competitor to the Canon S series but with a tiny and useable LVF integrated. It is marginally larger than the S95 and S120s. IOW, its breast pocket sized.
 
I really don't need it, my Rolleicord III is quite nice, but CLA'd & from KOH's at a decent price? Terribly tempting...

View attachment 439708

If it's still available on 1/19 my budget may be in trouble... ;)
Hmm. Like this?

E5000_JAK_2005-DSCN0117_Ew.jpg
Join to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


I had it fully serviced in the early 2000s.
 
Fantastic advice and points of view from all of you guys! Thank you for your answers! :)
That is why I enjoy a forum like this one.

I am a pilot as well, I carry a small LLBean (discrete) pack with a camera insert, I gave up trying to keep things in my kitbag, plus I need something while walking a city, thus the backpack. I tend to bring either the OM-5(previously the EM5.3) or the E-P7 along with my Leica M11-P. The Leica mount lenses adapt to the Olympus body thus giving me a mini telephoto. MFT Lens choices change per trip but a stalwart is the Olympus 14-150 or the 12-45 Pro, it just depends and there are many times I will even take the 14-42EZ. I will also bring a prime or two such as the Laowa 10/2 for wide and the 17/1.8 for a normal view. All are small, light and compact. If you want to keep something in your bag, go with the E-P7 and the 14-42EZ (or the Panasonic 12-32) along with the Panasonic 35-100/4-5.6 which is super tiny and light weight as you mentioned. Another intriguing lens that I have never tried but would like to is the Panasonic 45-175/4-5.6. There is also the Panasonic 12-60 kit lens that can be had for cheap and is really quite good. If you can get along without an EVF, I would highly recommend the E-P7, it is smaller than the EM5.3 with just as good image quality, plus it has a nice built in fill flash. Good luck with your decision!

Hi Bruce,

The more I think about it, the more the small 35-100 makes sense. (The showcase thread in Mu-43 is dangerous)
I have considered the 12-45/4, but since I own the 12-40/2.8, I would need to sell it first and I’m not sure I want to do that. The 45-175 is certainly a very very good option, and in my book the extra 75mm over the 35-100 are a big difference not to be disregarded lightly. There have been times when I take the 35-100/2.8 that I wished I had a longer lens.

The EP-7 is a gorgeous camera (plus it has the monochrome mode 2 that I love on my Pen-F), but I don’t like the fact that you can’t connect an external EVF like in the previous Pen cameras, and I really like to use a viewfinder. Possibly, the gorgeous EP-5 might be better option in that regard, I really don’t understand why Olympus decided to do that.

Sadly, the company I fly for doesn’t allow us to take an external backpack on top the flight bag (due branding image they say haha).

I've used both the Olympus Stylus 1 ands the Fujifilm X30.
The Stylus 1 is fun and seems like a miniature Olympus E-M1, with a fixed lens and, of course, a much smaller sensor. I enjoyed it quite a bit but ultimately couldn't quite 'gel' with it. The X30 on the other hand is, for me (and I have subjective and eclectic personal preferences about cameras) THE nicest small-sensor smallish camera I have ever owned and used. The manual zoom is a huge plus. The camera design appeals to me. And the EVF, while on the small side, is eminently useful All in all, the camera never ceases to surprise and delight me - and in the years I've owned and used it, has never let me down once. (Only one weak point - a flimsy plastic door which opens on the bottom of the camera, for both SD card and battery. You have to be careful with the door so as not to damage or break it.) One other cool thing about the X30 - it has two very useful (and very functional) 'Macro' modes - both an ordinary 'macro' and a 'super macro' - which allow the camera to take quite extreme closeups.
A final point is that the camera comes with several built-in Fuji simulations - including 'Classic Chrome', which is one of my favorite all-time color profiles - so much so that most of the time, I shoot with the camera on a jpeg-Classic-Chrome setting.

Hope this helps, Arturo.

Hi Miguel,

It seems to me that the X30 has been holding its value way better than many digital cameras. They are being sold on ebay from 500 to 1200 USD which is absolutely crazy!!! (I can buy a EM-1 III or even a K-3 III for that price). The only explanation that I find is that just like with the X100 family, there is certainly a lot of Fuji hype around it, because when the camera was released everyone was complaining about the small sensor and why Fuji didn’t upgrade the X30 to a 1inch sensor like the RX100 family.

If I could only find it for about 300 USD (a few years back they were being sold for that price) I would pay it, no questions.
I will keep looking for one in good condition (especially the black one), and if the price is right I will buy it.

I really enjoyed the following “reviews” of the X30 here:
Fujifilm X30 Review

As with many other examples, the ancient 2/3 Toshiba sensor is no slouch when used properly.

#Aviator: I’ve owned the X10, 20, and 30 and they are some of my favorite cameras. The sensor is one of the larger small sensors and the images are pleasing. The real jewel of these cameras is the lens. Fast and pretty sharp with a nice zoom range. Since it goes up to a 112 mm equivalent, you can get away without cropping, which is important with a small 12mp sensor. In a purely subjective observation, they are some of the nicest cameras to use. The X10 was my gateway drug to Fuji cameras. :ROFLMAO:
I also had the Stylus. If you want that zoom range, it was also a nice camera to use. The sensor was smaller and not quite as clean as the X10/20/30, but with modern noise reduction software, all of these cameras will produce cleaner images with regard to noise.

Hi Steve,

Yeah, definitely the 1/1.7 sensor is not bad under good lighting conditions and all the way to ISO 800 (1600 is a bit out of my taste even with DXO Prime to be completely honest). But the 300mm constant F2.8 equivalent lens is very very tempting. Lately I like to photograph lots of clouds during daylight when I’m flying, and the camera is perfect for that. (Who needs lots of fine detail on a cloud anyway?)

The X10/X20 are just a bit cheaper than the X30, but still around the 500 USD range...
I owned Fujifilm cameras before and I sold them in favor of my Olympus and Lumix cameras, and while for many reasons I’m not interested in building an APS-C Fuji X system again, the X30 is a very different and appealing product that I can see in my kit.

Of the ones mentioned, I have the Stylus, the X20 and the two Lumix lenses. I also have a TZ70 so am somewhat familiar with the TZ series, if not the 1" sensor.

For what I gather you are after, the Stylus seems to be the place to be, it really is very, very nice camera and it also shares batteries with the EM-5MkIII. Next would be the Lumix matched pair zooms, they really are a splendid pair of lenses and delivers results far above their weight class, and then the Fujifilm. It is nice, but somewhat "odd". I have one, mostly because I got a good deal on one and was a bit intrigued on the Fujifilm cameras.

Unless something ground breaking happened between the 70 and the 100, I would stay off that. I have quite a few Lumix cameras, and the only one I have taken an active dislike to is the TZ70.

One camera that you could look into is the Lumix LF-1, it is a truly compact camera with and was a competitor to the Canon S series but with a tiny and useable LVF integrated. It is marginally larger than the S95 and S120s. IOW, its breast pocket sized.

Hi Jens,

Yeah, the Stylus and the Lumix zoom lenses are currently the stronger contenders once I ponder all the current variables on the table, the fact that the Stylus it shares batteries with the EM-5 III (that I own) is fantastic.

The 1S is slightly more expensive than the plain 1, but once you update the firmware on the 1 it essentially becomes a 1S (minus the grip design change). I can get a Stylus 1 for about 300 USD or a 1S for something closer to 400 USD.

I think the camera that I like the least is the TZ-100, the ergonomics don’t seem to be great. It looks that it can be accidentally dropped very easily without a small wrist strap.

Considering the current prices, for about 250-300 USD I can get two lenses: the 12-32 and the 35-100 or even the 45-175 together! That is really hard to pass eh?

I was not aware of the existence of the Lumix LF-1, I will read about it.
 
Back
Top