I swore blind I never would do this!!

Lawrence A.

Hall of Famer
Nov 8, 2012
124
New Mexico
Larry
HI David

I should have left the whole discussion of the cloud aspect out of it. What I meant to point out is that the problem, at least if I understand what you are saying, is one of proprietary files more than the subscription format itself. I don't know if there is a stand alone version of illustrator one can buy on disc; there used to be. Would the Illustrator files from the CC subscription be openable in earlier versions of the program? I know I can open .psd Photoshop files created in CS6 on Photoshop 7, for which I have a disc.
 

Matero

Top Veteran
Jan 28, 2014
104
Helsinki, Finland
with how cheap local storage has become, I just don't understand cloud storage. But maybe I'm just a geezer. I like to have physical copies of my stuff.
Off-topic, but do you have safe place your backups in case of fire. That can also happen and your local backup is then melted together with the originals. So to be sure to survive catastrophe with your digital asset, cloud is quite clever. I have both, local and cloud backup storage.
 

Matero

Top Veteran
Jan 28, 2014
104
Helsinki, Finland
David, I have not read the whole thread, sorry for that, but have you googled with 'free Adobe illustrator converter'?
There is bunch of solutions out there to convert illustrator files to more standard ones.
 

WoodWorks

Regular
Dec 21, 2014
68
Larry: Thanks for the clarification. To answer your question: No, Illustrator CC files are not openable by previous versions. Once you opt for the CC subscription, you're stuck. If you stop paying, all of your files created with the CC version are beyond reach. You can't open them and you can't edit them with any other application, nor with any previous version of Illustrator.

Matero: Yes, I am aware of utilities that will convert Illustrator files. They all use the embedded pdf to convert the Illustrator files to editable pdfs. The problem is that the layers disappear, and type gets corrupted, among several other problems. Bottom line, the kind of fairly complex technical illustrations that I do for a living become a compete mess. If all you want to do is cut and paste a drawing into some other application, they work (mostly). But if you want to edit the file, forget it. Those utilities are more trouble than they're worth.

I wrote to Adobe, asking if they would be willing to create some sort of program where, once you stop paying, you still can open and edit your existing files. They gave all sorts of dubious reasons why they couldn't do that. So there's no way I'm going to sign up for CC unless I have no other option to stay in business. IMO, what Adobe has done by killing off Freehand and moving Illustrator to a subscription service is a cynical money grab and and a criminal abuse of their monopoly. And as long as I have some other option, they won't be getting a penny from me.
 
Jan 31, 2011
164
Newcastle, Australia
Sue
Shortlived. Not using Lightroom. Just can't seem to adapt to it and don't want to use it for editing. Gone. Now using Unbound, because really, all I want is something that will show my photographs in some kind of grid and then let me choose from a wide selection of apps for editing, and an "other" section for those apps not listed.

http://unboundformac.com

And its all much easier now. This, plus my plugins and CC/PS, all good.
 

SnapDawg

Rorschach Test Pilot
Apr 18, 2014
103
Canary Islands
Ken
IMO, what Adobe has done by killing off Freehand and moving Illustrator to a subscription service is a cynical money grab and and a criminal abuse of their monopoly. And as long as I have some other option, they won't be getting a penny from me.
Same here. Got my LR license for next to nothing and exclusively use it to develop X-Trans RAWs on an aging PC tablet that's too darn slow for PhotoNinja.
 

Luke

Super Moderator
Nov 11, 2011
214
Milwaukee, WI USA
Luke
Off-topic, but do you have safe place your backups in case of fire. That can also happen and your local backup is then melted together with the originals. So to be sure to survive catastrophe with your digital asset, cloud is quite clever. I have both, local and cloud backup storage.
I hate to split this main thread into two threads, but I have backed up everything at home at work. I'm only out of luck if my business burns down the same day as my house. And if that happens, the last thing I am worried about is my crappy photos. :laugh1:
 
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