if I never hear it again

Luke

Super Moderator
Nov 11, 2011
Milwaukee, WI USA
Luke
The only thing I can think of is that there were a lot of young couples making out in the late 50s while this song played on the radio. It's the only explanation for its' perplexing popularity. Because the song is just the WORST. In fact, I've often thought that if I ever SNAP, and go ballistic, this will be the soundtrack. 240 frames per second HD video of me with a machine gun in each hand while "Come Go With Me" by the Del Vikings plays out.

Although "At the Hop" by Danny & the Juniors elicits a similar response.

Ever ponder what the soundtrack to your psychotic break might be? Share it here. I reserve the right to add a few more tracks in the future.
 

Biro

Super Moderator
Aug 7, 2011
Jersey Shore
Steve
There are a number of shlocky songs from the late 50s and early 60s that make me want to vomit. For those too young to remember, it was because there was a concerted effort to co-opt rock and roll into a more mainstream, traditional sound. That's why we needed the Beatles when they came along.
 

wt21

Hall of Famer
Aug 15, 2010
Ah-oooooo Werewolf in London

For some reason, that song completely and absolutely grates on me. I will break a radio to shut that song up.
 

wt21

Hall of Famer
Aug 15, 2010
There are a number of shlocky songs from the late 50s and early 60s that make me want to vomit. For those too young to remember, it was because there was a concerted effort to co-opt rock and roll into a more mainstream, traditional sound. That's why we needed the Beatles when they came along.
You mean like itsy-bitsy-teeny-weeny yellow polka dot bikini? Or purple people eater? I love the novelty songs. But maybe you are talking about something else?

One early 1960s song I only learned of recently, and frankly was really shocked about, is Pat Boone's version of Moody River. Just seemed so incongruous with Pat's later image.

http://youtu.be/Cn1ddv8bSOU
 

Ray Sachs

Legend
Sep 21, 2010
Not too far from Philly
you should be able to figure it out...
Anything by one of those nameless, faceless, soul-less, sterile "rock" bands of the late '70s and early '80s. They all sound the same - they distilled all of the rock out of rock and just left the heavy chords and awful pop. I know a lot of people loved them, considered them the soundtrack to their lives, but I couldn't stand 'em. Hated 'em with a passion. When ANY of them come on the radio now, which they still do with alarming regularity, it makes many parts of my anatomy look for a nice soft warm place to hide.

You know who I'm talking about - Journey, Kansas, Styx, Supertramp, Little River Band, the Starship (once fully divorced from the Jefferson wing of the family), Foreigner, Boston - there are no doubt others I've mercifully managed to forget, but these are the best of them, and thus the worst of them. I make exceptions for the very very early Journey, when they were a mildly interesting offshoot of Santana's band, and the first Boston album, which did have a sort of interesting new set of guitar effects that stayed interesting for about one album. REO started off OK but sort of drifted in that direction too. That stuff in general was the most puerile, terrible form of pop music I've ever encountered. I'll take disco in a heartbeat - at least you could dance to it. And I pretty much hated disco...

I remember once getting free front row tickets to a Little River Band concert, which I went to because I liked the opening act, who I can't remember any more. My date and I rocked and danced and had a great time to the opener while everyone else sat on their hands waiting for LRB. I was determined to TRY to stay for that band since we'd been given GREAT tickets. But after managing to live miserably through about three songs, we tried not to boo loud enough to be heard over the adoring masses, and finally left and found a good Norteno dance band in a dive bar for the rest of the evening. Then I made it up to her by getting equally great seats to the Kinks a few weeks later...

Head East kind of started the whole mess and I kind of liked them, but hated what they spawned. Sort of like Zepplin was the genius band that led to a generation of horrible metal.

-Ray
 

ReD

Hall of Famer
Mar 27, 2013
Come on Eileen - Dexys Midnight Runners

does it for me everytime

On a campsite years ago I had a falling out with a real obnoxious ticket collector because of his attitude to the kids playing. After, when he got on his bike & rode off singing Come on Eileen a beer can bounced off his head.
 

Ripleysbaby

supernatural anesthetist
Sep 9, 2011
Cumbria UK
Garry
Come on Eileen - Dexys Midnight Runners

does it for me everytime

On a campsite years ago I had a falling out with a real obnoxious ticket collector because of his attitude to the kids playing. After, when he got on his bike & rode off singing Come on Eileen a beer can bounced off his head.
Full or empty ?
 

Ray Sachs

Legend
Sep 21, 2010
Not too far from Philly
you should be able to figure it out...
There are too many abominations to list ...
Yeah, reminds me of another recent discussion about the vast majority of street photography, or ANY photography for that matter, being crap. Well, the vast majority of ANY art form is crap, even music and even music that makes it as far as the radio. So you try to seek out the good stuff and just try and try like all hell to keep the terrible stuff from getting stuck in your head. Because that's what they pay the big bucks for - the clever hooks you can't get out of your head no matter how much you hate them!

There's a lot of crap music. There's a lot of crap photography. There's a lot of crap politics and food too, so why should art be any different?

-Ray
 

Biro

Super Moderator
Aug 7, 2011
Jersey Shore
Steve
Nb
Anything by one of those nameless, faceless, soul-less, sterile "rock" bands of the late '70s and early '80s. They all sound the same - they distilled all of the rock out of rock and just left the heavy chords and awful pop. I know a lot of people loved them, considered them the soundtrack to their lives, but I couldn't stand 'em. Hated 'em with a passion. When ANY of them come on the radio now, which they still do with alarming regularity, it makes many parts of my anatomy look for a nice soft warm place to hide.

You know who I'm talking about - Journey, Kansas, Styx, Supertramp, Little River Band, the Starship (once fully divorced from the Jefferson wing of the family), Foreigner, Boston - there are no doubt others I've mercifully managed to forget, but these are the best of them, and thus the worst of them. I make exceptions for the very very early Journey, when they were a mildly interesting offshoot of Santana's band, and the first Boston album, which did have a sort of interesting new set of guitar effects that stayed interesting for about one album. REO started off OK but sort of drifted in that direction too. That stuff in general was the most puerile, terrible form of pop music I've ever encountered. I'll take disco in a heartbeat - at least you could dance to it. And I pretty much hated disco...

I remember once getting free front row tickets to a Little River Band concert, which I went to because I liked the opening act, who I can't remember any more. My date and I rocked and danced and had a great time to the opener while everyone else sat on their hands waiting for LRB. I was determined to TRY to stay for that band since we'd been given GREAT tickets. But after managing to live miserably through about three songs, we tried not to boo loud enough to be heard over the adoring masses, and finally left and found a good Norteno dance band in a dive bar for the rest of the evening. Then I made it up to her by getting equally great seats to the Kinks a few weeks later...

Head East kind of started the whole mess and I kind of liked them, but hated what they spawned. Sort of like Zepplin was the genius band that led to a generation of horrible metal.

-Ray
Remember, Ray, this was called "corporate rock."
 

Ray Sachs

Legend
Sep 21, 2010
Not too far from Philly
you should be able to figure it out...
Nb

Remember, Ray, this was called "corporate rock."
I actually didn't remember that or know it at the time, but it's a good name. Took all of the funk and soul and grit and swagger and blues out of rock, supplied a bunch of catchy hooks played around power chords and made sure all of the singers had crazy high voices. God, it was just awful stuff, and so MUCH of it all at once. And there was plenty of good music happening then too, Springsteen was at his best, Petty was just coming into his own, Richard Thompson was doing some of his best work, the Stones were making a pretty respectable little comeback even. And all of the good post punk stuff - Talking Heads, Ramones, the Clash at their best, Television, Patti Smith - damn, PLENTY of good music. But that stuff was just about too terrible to bear...

I guess it really doesn't matter though, because after all, we're all just dust in the wind....

-Ray
 

Lightmancer

Super Moderator
Aug 13, 2011
Sunny Frimley
Bill Palmer
I am particularly prone to "earworms" - tunes that get stuck in your head and just won't leave.

For some reason many cr@p songs have a strong, incessant "hook". One of the all-time worst in recent years was "La la la" by a sadist called "Naughty Boy" and his partner in crime, a lady named "Sam Smith".

She it was who provided the teeth-grindingly awful la-la-ing that gets stuck in my head like a piece of recalcitrant chewing gum to the sole of one's shoe.

I refuse to provide a link to the performance of this ditty because I like you all too much. Anyone who Googles it out of curiosity will only have themselves to blame.
 

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