If you could only have 1 camera (inc lens) What would it be?

retow

All-Pro
Jul 24, 2010
The brain decision would be OMD with the Panasonic 12-35mm f2.8 lens. An extremely capable and versatile set up, including weather sealing. In principle covering all one needs, except for dedicated macro and wildlife shooters.
The heart decision would be Sigma DP2 Merrill. What a sensor, what a lens! Putting all Bayer set ups short of the Nikon 800 to shame as far as IQ is concerned, including M9 with a Summilux asph lens.
 

nippa

Top Veteran
Aug 7, 2010
Cheshire UK
Dennis
Since I was a small lad I've always liked miniature devices whether it be radios , computers , TVs or cameras.
When Leica brought out the CL in 1973 I tried to buy one but my head ruled the day and I didn't go through with the purchase.

For almost 40 years I regretted not getting that camera.
Then Leica produced the X1 and I saw that as my opportunity to buy a proper Leica again. ( never liked the M series )

That's the one camera I keep.
That's the one camera that has the genuine Leica Look and is very much in the tradition of the Leica CL

( if I were allowed a second camera it would be the Canon G1X for its Leica-like Image Quality )
 
Sep 8, 2010
London UK
Andy
Size, weight, handling, autofocus speed/accuracy, metering, overall performance, touch autofocus, lens character, sensor image quality, etc etc. Plus I prefer a simple lens like the P14 to a collapsing/extending lens like the Coolpix A or Ricoh GR.
This is really interesting. I find my little E-PM1's IQ to be good but not great. Size is a little small too. Does anyone know how the E-PM2 measures up to the E-PM1 for IQ?

My choices have come down to:
DP1m - Just love the IQ and detail plus will give 28mm (ish) equiv focal length
OM-D - I have never had a desire to own one but my head says it's the ideal all round camera for me! With the 14mm it would be really good and a 17mm f1.8 would give 35mm equiv.
X100s - This looks like the fave at the moment. I just love the images and how they look. I could have this and get the 28mm lens for it for when I want 28mm
E-P5 - Looks very cool!!
GF6- Love the look of this thing!! Nee to see IQ 1st. My son's GF5 was impressive I thought!

I need to flip a coin!!:biggrin:
 
Sep 8, 2010
London UK
Andy
Right.... I have just found out that Sigma are offering cash back to existing Sigma customers!! As I already have the DP2m I can get the DP1m and £200 cashback!! So after a bit of staff discount and the cashback this is probably the route I'm going to take. Having both cameras will mean 4 batteries in total!! Plenty of spares for when I'm out and about!!
 

retow

All-Pro
Jul 24, 2010
Right.... I have just found out that Sigma are offering cash back to existing Sigma customers!! As I already have the DP2m I can get the DP1m and £200 cashback!! So after a bit of staff discount and the cashback this is probably the route I'm going to take. Having both cameras will mean 4 batteries in total!! Plenty of spares for when I'm out and about!!
Don`t forget about the DP3M, it`s a must have as well:wink:

View attachment 5819
 

Luckypenguin

Hall of Famer
Dec 24, 2010
Brisbane, Australia
Nic
This year I decided to spend my money on travelling in Cuba, Central America, and South America (material over gear; crazy I know). So far, and as expected, compared with anything else I have with me, have used previously, and have researched, the only camera that never feels inadequate in any situation or environment is the Olympus E-M5. By comparison, a lot of compact cameras tend to be fairly niche or use throwback design and controls or are a bit too small or have fixed focal length lenses, and any DSLR setup is too big and has only token live-view. If reduced to only one camera the answer is too easy to even contemplate. In this environment I want a camera where I have no excuses to make over it not being suited to the task.
 

Ray Sachs

Legend
Sep 21, 2010
Not too far from Philly
you should be able to figure it out...
This is really interesting. I find my little E-PM1's IQ to be good but not great. Size is a little small too. Does anyone know how the E-PM2 measures up to the E-PM1 for IQ?

My choices have come down to:
DP1m - Just love the IQ and detail plus will give 28mm (ish) equiv focal length
OM-D - I have never had a desire to own one but my head says it's the ideal all round camera for me! With the 14mm it would be really good and a 17mm f1.8 would give 35mm equiv.
X100s - This looks like the fave at the moment. I just love the images and how they look. I could have this and get the 28mm lens for it for when I want 28mm
E-P5 - Looks very cool!!
GF6- Love the look of this thing!! Nee to see IQ 1st. My son's GF5 was impressive I thought!
The EPM2 uses the same new 16mp Sony sensor as is in the OMD and EPL5. Its a fairly massive step up from the 12mp Panasonic sensor that Oly had used in the EPM1 and all of its other m43 bodies prior to the OMD. So, yeah, you'll see a big difference between the IQ of the EPM1 and EPM2. I think the cameras are reasonably similar otherwise, but the new sensor is a big jump. Dynamic range, low light, resolution, pretty much everywhere.

If you want both 28 and 35mm, I'd say you're looking at one of the m43 options with the Pany 14 and new Oly 17 or you're looking at the X100s with the 28mm adapter. I wouldn't recommend changing that lens a lot (its not all that quick and you have to remember to change the menu every time. I can't tell you how often I forgot to change the menu in the few weeks I had the X100s. But use it as a 28mm some days and a 35mm some days and you should be fine. The choice between the X100s and any of the m43 bodies you've identified is more about shooting style and aesthetics more than anything else. Both have incredible IQ. The Fuji raw files still aren't entirely sorted with 3rd party processors, but they're way better than they were and are probably fine for most of us. No issues at all with the m43 raws. But the Fuji jpegs are absolutely sublime, the only jpegs I've ever chosen to use over raw, and its not because of the issues with the raw files - I did the same with the X100 and those raw files didn't have any issues. The modern Olympus bodies are all up to the same standards in terms of IQ. The GF6 I don't know about for sure. I know the GH3 is in the same category as the Olympus bodies in terms of the sensor, but I'm not sure about the GF6 or G6 - I think they may use a slightly older sensor from the GH2 (which was already quite good but not quite up to the standard of the Olys or GH3).

The DP1m is a wonderful choice in a limited set of circumstances. If you're OK with its fairly serious limitations, you'll probably love it. If not, it might drive you nuts. It would drive me stone cold crazy in a matter of minutes. I like to be able to shoot in low light and to shoot fairly quickly sometimes, neither of which are really options with the DP1m. So if you want amazing IQ but only in good light and for ONE SHOT AT A TIME, go for it.

-Ray
 
Sep 8, 2010
London UK
Andy
This year I decided to spend my money on travelling in Cuba, Central America, and South America (material over gear; crazy I know). So far, and as expected, compared with anything else I have with me, have used previously, and have researched, the only camera that never feels inadequate in any situation or environment is the Olympus E-M5. By comparison, a lot of compact cameras tend to be fairly niche or use throwback design and controls or are a bit too small or have fixed focal length lenses, and any DSLR setup is too big and has only token live-view. If reduced to only one camera the answer is too easy to even contemplate. In this environment I want a camera where I have no excuses to make over it not being suited to the task.
Now you see there is the reason to get the OM-D, It's the sensible choice! hmmmmmmm
 

Gary

All-Pro
Aug 19, 2012
Southern California
Gary Ayala
... or you're looking at the X100s with the 28mm adapter. I wouldn't recommend changing that lens a lot (its not all that quick and you have to remember to change the menu every time. I can't tell you how often I forgot to change the menu in the few weeks I had the X100s. But use it as a 28mm some days and a 35mm some days and you should be fine. The choice between the X100s and any of the m43 bodies you've identified is more about shooting style and aesthetics more than anything else. Both have incredible IQ. The Fuji raw files still aren't entirely sorted with 3rd party processors, but they're way better than they were and are probably fine for most of us. No issues at all with the m43 raws. ...

-Ray
I assigned the flip between 28mm and 35mm to a button. Easy, quick and no menu diving.
 

Ray Sachs

Legend
Sep 21, 2010
Not too far from Philly
you should be able to figure it out...
I assigned the flip between 28mm and 35mm to a button. Easy, quick and no menu diving.
I'm sure in time you'd get in the habit of doing it, whether menu diving or assigned to a button (what button - there's only the one programmable fn button anymore, right?). My problems was just thoroughly forgetting to do it. It wasn't a matter of difficulty, it was a matter of just not thinking of it because changing a menu when I change a lens is nothing I've ever had to deal with regularly before...

-Ray
 

ean10775

All-Pro
Feb 13, 2013
Cleveland, Ohio
Eric
For me it would have to be an APSC or larger size sensor with a 35mm equivalent lens. I like the idea of the RX1, but wouldn't be able to live without a viewfinder and after using the hybrid finder of the X100S I'm pretty much sold on that concept. So for now I'm going to say the X100S, but an X-Pro 1 with the 23mm f1.4 Fuji has on their roadmap might also be a possibility down the line.
 

bartjeej

Hall of Famer
Nov 12, 2010
bart
This year I decided to spend my money on travelling in Cuba, Central America, and South America (material over gear; crazy I know). So far, and as expected, compared with anything else I have with me, have used previously, and have researched, the only camera that never feels inadequate in any situation or environment is the Olympus E-M5. By comparison, a lot of compact cameras tend to be fairly niche or use throwback design and controls or are a bit too small or have fixed focal length lenses, and any DSLR setup is too big and has only token live-view. If reduced to only one camera the answer is too easy to even contemplate. In this environment I want a camera where I have no excuses to make over it not being suited to the task.
To a large extent I agree with your reasoning, and the OM-D is actually very close to my dream camera. However, for my purpose (backpacking), the weathersealed lenses for this camera are all too large, and with a non-weathersealed prime, it doesn't offer that much over the X100 (although IBIS is very nice); that, combined with a fairly high price (which diminishes my travel budget), made me choose the X100 over it. But if I had more money and/or didn't have to carry the weight on my back for months on end, the OM-D would be a no-brainer.
 

Ray Sachs

Legend
Sep 21, 2010
Not too far from Philly
you should be able to figure it out...
To a large extent I agree with your reasoning, and the OM-D is actually very close to my dream camera. However, for my purpose (backpacking), the weathersealed lenses for this camera are all too large, and with a non-weathersealed prime, it doesn't offer that much over the X100 (although IBIS is very nice); that, combined with a fairly high price (which diminishes my travel budget), made me choose the X100 over it. But if I had more money and/or didn't have to carry the weight on my back for months on end, the OM-D would be a no-brainer.
I've often said that if I could only have one camera system, it would be built around the OMD. And if we're talking about a multi-lens setup, I'd still say that, as much as I love the variety I get from my other gear. In fact, I've really limited my OMD gear to mostly longer lenses now because I have other gear that covers the other focal lengths in ways I prefer. But if we're talking one full system, its built around the OMD because it's just so damned good at everything I do. No real downsides to that camera, and if I didn't love variety so much, an extensive m43 setup with a couple of bodies might do it for me.

BUT....

That wasn't the question here. It was about a single camera and single lens (and has since morphed into maybe two lenses, tops, or two fixed lens cameras.... Which is the way this stuff always starts!). But for ONE SINGLE camera/lens combination, the "system" strengths didn't matter any more and it just comes down to what's your favorite focal length (or zoom range) and what's the best way for you to get that in a one camera / one lens setup. At which point I'm considering either the RX1 or one of the new 28mm pocketable fixed lens fraternal twins from Nikon and Ricoh. Or, if a "conversion lens" doesn't count against your one lens allowance, maybe the X100s with the 28mm adapter also.

If we're talking full systems, my answer changes completely. And I'd go with the OMD. But that wasn't the question...

-Ray
 

john m flores

All-Pro
Aug 13, 2012
DA*16-50 isn't that big, but I changed my mine anyway. Make it a D800 with the 24-70 F2.8. If it's gonna be one camera and lens, it better be a Swiss Army knife that'll handle anything I throw at it...
 

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