Film If you could only have one (film) camera for the rest of your life?

If you could only have one camera for the rest of your life, which one would you choose?

  • Leica M6

    Votes: 3 27.3%
  • Leica M5

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Hasselblad 500 C/M (any one of the 500 series)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Hasselblad Xpan

    Votes: 1 9.1%
  • Widelux (35mm)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Widelux 1500

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Rolleiflex TLR 2.8

    Votes: 2 18.2%
  • Any one large format camera (which one?)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Any one SLR (which one?)

    Votes: 5 45.5%

  • Total voters
    11

phigmov

Top Veteran
Mar 23, 2015
I often photograph in difficult lighting, I saw so many Rollei 3.5s but am afraid that it'll limit my photography. But yeah the 6x6 is looking like it may be the next phase in my photography journey.
The 3.5 still has really nice bokeh (see below with some Agfa Astia) and its worth remembering the DOF on MF is a little thinner than 35mm so the aperture limitation can often be more forgiving when focusing. But the big googly glass of a 2.8 TLR is definitely swoonworthy.

 

Lightmancer

Super Moderator
Aug 13, 2011
Sunny Frimley
Bill Palmer
How do you use it on the fly without a built-in light meter?

I am currently using a film camera with no light meter and it's a struggle photographing my 2 year old as she's running around. I'm moving as fast as I can trying to meter, then adjust the settings, then shoot each shot.
I use Sunny-16 with my IID. I only use it with ISO400 monochrome film, and often shoot at hyperfocal before fine tuning focus. The focusing tab means I can rough-focus by feel before raising the camera to my eye. Brass, glass, rubberised cloth, nickel plate, steel and vulcanite in perfect harmony - who needs more? ;)
 

Biro

Super Moderator
Aug 7, 2011
Jersey Shore
Steve
How do you use it on the fly without a built-in light meter?

I am currently using a film camera with no light meter and it's a struggle photographing my 2 year old as she's running around. I'm moving as fast as I can trying to meter, then adjust the settings, then shoot each shot.
Most of the time, I use the old Sunny 16 rule:


If I must have a meter, I use the app I downloaded to my phone. I use myLightmeter PRO:


But it's not that often. Film is fairly forgiving in terms of exposure - particularly black and white. If you're off a stop or so, it's not that big a deal - especially if you have a good shop doing your developing and printing. I don't have the space and time for my own darkroom the way I did 30+ years ago.
 

TraamisVOS

Hall of Famer
Nov 29, 2010
Melbourne, Australia
If I must have a meter, I use the app I downloaded to my phone.

Film is fairly forgiving in terms of exposure - particularly black and white. If you're off a stop or so, it's not that big a deal - especially if you have a good shop doing your developing and printing.
I tried the light meter app on my phone but it just runs down my phone battery so last week I bought a vintage Sekonic light meter from the camera shop. Gotta learn how to use it. But it's still a big step to independently meter the light and then pick up the camera to take a shot. I think this is going to have to be something I need to get used to.

That is good to know about film being forgiving.
I am currently sending my film away to be developed. I'm trying to learn how to scan and post-process them myself. I have a ton of developed film that I haven't figured out how to scan yet.
 

Biro

Super Moderator
Aug 7, 2011
Jersey Shore
Steve
I love the idea of instant film and have been tempted to buy an instant camera but I know I just couldn't live with capturing a few great pics only to have a single hardcopy of it forever.
You can scan instant prints as well. They’ll be of limited resolution but the files will work for prints of the same size or slightly larger.
 

TraamisVOS

Hall of Famer
Nov 29, 2010
Melbourne, Australia
You can scan instant prints as well. They’ll be of limited resolution but the files will work for prints of the same size or slightly larger.
You can scan polaroids too but it's not like scanning direct from a negative. I feel like it's a couple of steps away from a proper scan and proper preservation, and a few more steps further from obtaining a scan that is useable on further prints.
 

Graham Moore

Regular
Oct 15, 2018
Vancouver BC
Graham
Canon T90.
The precursor of the entire EOS line - probably the manual focus proof of design prior to launching the new autofocus mount. If I could have had an updated manual focus FD mount digital sensor version, I'd most likely still be using it with all of my old lenses.
 

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