Fuji Incredible India

flysurfer

Hall of Famer
Aug 31, 2011
GFXA3837
by Rico Pfirstinger, auf Flickr

GFXA3844
by Rico Pfirstinger, auf Flickr

Thanks to the vast dynamic range of the GFX 50S, backlit scenes are easy to realize.

Please note that the sensor saturation point of the GFX 50S sensor is 1/3 EV higher than with other cameras. This comes in handy in situations like this. Here we see strong backlight on the kid's hair, which would normally blow the highlights stronger than it is here the case.
 

flysurfer

Hall of Famer
Aug 31, 2011
If you inspect the two images in post #21 at 100% (by clicking on an image and then using the corresponding full-size viewing functions in Flickr), you can see me mirrored in the kid's eyes. As you can see, I am using the GFX's tilting screen, holding the camera close to the ground. Again, face/eye detection was my friend.

I also added artificial analog film grain in Lightroom to achieve a more organic look with additional texture.

You can also see that even at f/4, pixel-sharp DOF was so shallow that the nose tip of the kid is already slightly out-of-focus in the second image.
 

flysurfer

Hall of Famer
Aug 31, 2011
GFXA3858
by Rico Pfirstinger, auf Flickr

Direct backlight is once again no problem for the GFX. I was focussing hyperfocally using the pixel-based DOF indicator. This is my usual modus operandi for landscape-type shooting situations that either require maximum DOF. All I had then to do was to wait for a usable arrangement of people in the frame. In this case, I liked the woman that was walking through the frame. Since the camera didn't have to focus, shutter lag was minimal and I could capture the decisive moment.
 

flysurfer

Hall of Famer
Aug 31, 2011
GFXA3977
by Rico Pfirstinger, auf Flickr

Another high dynamic range situation. To get a comfortable (aka bright) EVF view, I often manually set my exposure at base-ISO (100 in case of the GFX) to capture critical highlights (the sky in this case), then add 2 EV of ISO with the ISO dial (from 100 to 400 in this case) and then subtract 2 EV of ISO by selecting DR400%. This means that my RAW exposure remains the same (aka perfectly matching the critical highlights of my scene), while my live view in the EVF is two stops brighter, which makes it much easier to frame a backlit scene like this one.
 

flysurfer

Hall of Famer
Aug 31, 2011
Shooting panoramas is fun with the GFX. I use a Kirkland L-bracket to mount the camera upright on a tripod, then take a series of shots. In Lightroom, I merge the RAW files to a Panorama-DNG with a size of typically 300-400 MP. After processing this DNG, I export JPEGs with a height of 4000 pixels and 60-70 MP. That's a reduction of more than 50% on each axis. This improves pixel quality due to the original oversampling, it's a bit like using a Foveon camera with 24 MP.
 

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