Leica Showcase Industar 61L/D in Leica Mount

BrianS

Super Moderator
Apr 3, 2013
124
This is one of the best of the Tessar formula that you can buy. Great optics, the mechanics of the mount do not do it justice. It's also one of the cheapest Leica mount lenses that you can buy, typically under $25 or so. Most are made in the early 90s. This lens uses low-dispersion glass, and the color rendition and overall sharpness are among the best that you will find.

But... in general, be prepared to do a CLA of the focus mount, use a heavy grease for the mechanism that holds the mount in place. Also be prepared to Shim the lens for the Leica. So that's what I did with this one today...

Focus was close, but adding 0.1mm to the main shim did the trick. Close-up shots are shown, I did a test at infinity: was perfectly usable. F2.8 is forgiving.

L1016456 by fiftyonepointsix, on Flickr

L1016454 by fiftyonepointsix, on Flickr

L1016458 by fiftyonepointsix, on Flickr

L1016459 by fiftyonepointsix, on Flickr
 

BrianS

Super Moderator
Apr 3, 2013
124
It's Fall here, leaves turning. Good for a quick test.

L1016460 by fiftyonepointsix, on Flickr

I will try this on the M Monochrom. As it is Low-Dispersion, it should be good.

I have a second one coming in, hopefully it will turn out as nice as this one. If the focus mount is really bad, I convert them for use on the Contax and Nikon rangefinders. They were never made in Kiev mount, I make them in Collapsible lenses using left over parts from the Sonnar conversions.
 
D

dalethorn

Guest
It's Fall here, leaves turning. Good for a quick test.

L1016460 by fiftyonepointsix, on Flickr

I will try this on the M Monochrom. As it is Low-Dispersion, it should be good.

I have a second one coming in, hopefully it will turn out as nice as this one. If the focus mount is really bad, I convert them for use on the Contax and Nikon rangefinders. They were never made in Kiev mount, I make them in Collapsible lenses using left over parts from the Sonnar conversions.
Leaves are a tough test, especially with the insect chew holes. These look good.
 

Mr_Flibble

Veteran
Aug 16, 2013
68
The Lowlands
I have one of these for my FSU cameras, and one in a close-focussing M42 mount as well.

I know they can be razor sharp, but my screwmount sample wasn't when I tested it on a Zorki-S. Maybe I should try it on another body.
 

BrianS

Super Moderator
Apr 3, 2013
124
The I-61L/D uses a split-ring "shim" that sits between the optics module and the focus ting. I have seen them way off, like actual focus 3m when the RF is focused at 5m. The optics are held in with a retaining ring, seen when you pull the light baffle out. A hint: if it does not screw back in smoothly, some paint dislodged in the threads...
 

Riego

Regular
Apr 17, 2019
19
The I-61L/D uses a split-ring "shim" that sits between the optics module and the focus ting. I have seen them way off, like actual focus 3m when the RF is focused at 5m. The optics are held in with a retaining ring, seen when you pull the light baffle out. A hint: if it does not screw back in smoothly, some paint dislodged in the threads...
Is there a guide with the adjustment process for Leica?
 

BrianS

Super Moderator
Apr 3, 2013
124
I have not done a guide for the I-61L/D here, or Leicaplace. Probably done long ago on a now defunct website.

This is not too bad: The rear light baffle will pop out, I use pliers designed for split retaining rings, the type that needs to be spread. After that, a standard spanner is use to remove the retaining ring. One screw holds the barrel in position.
 

Riego

Regular
Apr 17, 2019
19
Thanks!! I split the optic module and I can see a "yellow" split-ring. Do I have to add a paper shim?
 

BrianS

Super Moderator
Apr 3, 2013
124
I paper shim, maybe two- are all that is "typically" required.

This is where shooting a test is the final authority. The worst I-61 I've seen was off my 2m at a 5m distance.
 

BrianS

Super Moderator
Apr 3, 2013
124
Did you test the lens as delivered? Was it back-focusing then? If it was back-focusing originally, 1 paper shim should not throw it off unless something is holding the lens out of place.

Sometimes you get lucky with a lens, it is right on. Sometimes- someone else has adjusted it.
 

Riego

Regular
Apr 17, 2019
19
Did you test the lens as delivered? Was it back-focusing then? If it was back-focusing originally, 1 paper shim should not throw it off unless something is holding the lens out of place.

Sometimes you get lucky with a lens, it is right on. Sometimes- someone else has adjusted it.
As delivered is back-focus. With one shim... it´s difficult for me in my portraits to see if it´s slight back focus or slight front focus... I need to do a new test.

With two shims it´s really front focus.
 

Riego

Regular
Apr 17, 2019
19
My late father repaired cameras and he used a piece of matted glass cut to fit between the film rails and a loupe to check on sharpness. Makes the feedback loop that much faster :).
I've heard about that but I have no idea how to do it. But, thanks a lot!
 

BrianS

Super Moderator
Apr 3, 2013
124
For cameras with a removable back, hinged back, or flap: I've used a clear negative strip, taped to the back of the film gate with. Then use a loupe with a glass reticle to hold it flat while viewing. For the Barnack style cameras: you just have to test with film.
 

addieleman

Veteran
Oct 20, 2012
104
The Netherlands
For cameras with a removable back, hinged back, or flap: I've used a clear negative strip, taped to the back of the film gate with. Then use a loupe with a glass reticle to hold it flat while viewing. For the Barnack style cameras: you just have to test with film.
Maybe an old viewfinder screen will work, something like a screen for the Nikon FM2, it's just a screen without any frame if I remember correctly.
 

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