Industrial Photography

Mar 3, 2013
123
John Griggs
These shots are wonderful John. Now if you can add some male models!!! :popcorm2:
lol! Thanks, Karen -- however as to your second point most of my friends would probably make you want to keep looking at the machinery...

Although my buddy Ken is told that he looks a bit like Johnny Depp... and he hates it, lol.
 
Mar 3, 2013
123
John Griggs
Mar 3, 2013
123
John Griggs
Mine too! That and the big arrow on the rusty plate.

There's more around, but I need to remember where. There's been so much clean up and "gentrification" of the place that much of the old character is gone. It's a really big place overall, lol.
 
Mar 3, 2013
123
John Griggs
Well, here's a first industrial shot from my new Fujifilm X100, out-of-camera JPG with slight sharpening and curves adjustment is all.

ISO 3200, F/4, 1/51 second (yes, that's what the EXIF says, lol) It's uploaded here as and attachment so I think you can click the link underneath it and see the full size file.



View attachment 6880
 
Mar 3, 2013
123
John Griggs
Here's a few more from today. These were processed in Lightroom though. At the end is a Lightroom processed version of the first one I shot.

However, these are all still done from JPG's and not my usual RAW's. I have to say this camera has some JPG output that rocks.


Fujifilm X100 Tests: Ladle "Sanding" by Entropic Remnants, on Flickr


Fujifilm X100 Tests: Fire Breath by Entropic Remnants, on Flickr


Fujifilm X100 Tests: Tapping Begins by Entropic Remnants, on Flickr


Fujifilm X100 Tests: Fetching a Full Ladle by Entropic Remnants, on Flickr


Fuji X100 Test: Pausing for Breath by Entropic Remnants, on Flickr
 
Mar 3, 2013
123
John Griggs
Okay very cool, what is happening here to create such a flame?
Behind that "back stop" which is faced with ceramic fiber insulation, there is a burner system with a larger blower and gas injection nozzles. There is also a thermocouple barely protruding from the "wool" which controls the size of the flame. When they remove a ladle, it cools and the flame goes to full power which is what you see here. The ladle in the background is already hot and the flame has backed off but the entire inside is glowing yellow hot.

The flame heats the magnesia/carbon ceramic linings of the thick steel ladles that hold 180 tons of molten steel. When the furnace "taps" the steel into the ladles, if the lining was not hot it would crack and the molten steel would eat through the ladle's steel shell. That occasionally happens ANYWAY when a lining fails and it's called a "ladle breakout".
 
Mar 3, 2013
123
John Griggs
Here's a few from the Fujifilm X100 I took today. I will tell you few cameras do as well with the color and dynamic range in this environment in JPG. These are all JPG shots tweaked in Lightroom and though I might have done better in RAW -- I don't think it would be by too much. This is an amazing performance on this material by any camera.


Meltdown by Entropic Remnants, on Flickr


Stir Lance by Entropic Remnants, on Flickr


Ladle and Lances by Entropic Remnants, on Flickr
 

rpavich

Veteran
Jul 10, 2013
28
Nice shots...very detailed and well exposed. The lighting situation looked like it was a nightmare but it works for me.
 

rpavich

Veteran
Jul 10, 2013
28
That second batch is even better! (I expect terminator to come down on a hook and into some molten metal at any moment!)
 
Mar 3, 2013
123
John Griggs
Nice shots...very detailed and well exposed. The lighting situation looked like it was a nightmare but it works for me.
Thanks, all!

Yes, you generally expose not to blow out the highlights "too much" (that's a "season to taste" thing), and then hope you can pull the shadows. Now, with some cameras there just isn't enough left in the shadows in JPG -- but the Fuji has some kind of "secret sauce" because these JPG's take more pulling in the shadows than I'm used to with APS-C cameras like the Nikon's and Sony's I had and certainly more than any micro four thirds I've owned. It's part of the reason I usually shot RAW.

The X100 really does have the best JPG's I've worked with so far. I really am impressed by this.
 
Mar 3, 2013
123
John Griggs
Nice images! Does look like it would make a cool set for a movie.
Thanks!

Steel mills have been used for numerous "dark" films because they are dramatic, dirty, and sort of post-apocalyptic looking, lol. "Terminator" for instance as was already mentioned used a mill for some scenes.
 
Mar 3, 2013
123
John Griggs
I decided to take a page out of Isoterica's book and try the Velvia simulation. I did however use the "Medium Soft" shadows setting to make up for the nasty black clipping and I think it helped some. The X100's Velvia sim is not like the one from the X100S.

My "Life Amid the Ruins" project is about taking a prime lens, handheld, and shooting urbex under less than ideal conditions. I haven't added to this series literally for years now.

These may be a bit excessive because I shot them with the Fuji X100 in it's Velvia slide film simulation. It's not perfect for sure, but it does do the purple shadows the real film used to give me at times -- and the incredible selective color saturation of Velvia.

These are all from an abandoned pumphouse on the Naamans Creek near where I work.

Fujifilm X100 handheld, and some with the WCL-X100 wide converter.


Life Amid the Ruins: Easy as 1-2-3 by Entropic Remnants, on Flickr


Life Amid the Ruins: Retirement Home by Entropic Remnants, on Flickr


Life Amid the Ruins: Window on the World by Entropic Remnants, on Flickr
 

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