Landscapes in B&W

akuiper

Regular
Preda 21-9 L1367631-2.jpg

Preda Switserland -
Zeiss ZM 28mm
 

grebeman

Old Codgers Group
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View west from Birch Tor - Dartmoor

One white building can be seen just right of centre in this view taken on Dartmoor. At an elevation of 1425 feet (434 metres) above sea level this is the highest and most isolated inn in southern England, the Warren House Inn. There are scars in the landscape in the middle distance and near the inn which gives the clue as to its presence in this isolated location, these are the remains of tin mining which began in about the 14th century exploiting seams of tin ore that came to the surface. When suitable machinery became available mines were sunk reaching about 600 feet deep to exploit better seams of ore lying underground.

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Below the Warren House Inn - Dartmoor

The current building dates from 1845 and replaced an earlier one built to serve the needs of the miners who lived in this location at a time when it must have been a hive of activity. It is totally self sufficient and generates its own electricity. The last mine to close was the Golden Dagger in 1930 and the inn now relies on passing trade and tourism, the road passing its door is one of only two that traverse the moor from one side to the other. I grew up about 20 miles to the south as the crow flies and was aged 15 in 1963 when we suffered extremely heavy snow falls and cold that lasted from New Year until March. I regularly walked a farm lane that was frozen solid with snow reaching the hedge tops and remained thus for 8 weeks, here it was 12 weeks before the road was cleared of snow drifts up to 20 feet deep. I can testify that it serves a good meal and has good cider as well, I can't comment on the quality of its beer!

Barrie
 

grebeman

Old Codgers Group
I wasn't really sure where to post these images, so here is as good as anywhere although it's not exactly pretty landscape, so not quite your normal run of landscape images.

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This is a construction camp on a natural gas pipeline in Algeria. When I was there commissioning the gas turbines (far left of the picture) in 1975 with construction having finished there were only 17 of us living here. We knew the site as Station Bravo. It was 70 miles to the nearest hard top road and is south of the town of Biskra. At the end of October we had five days of torrential rain which flooded a wadi about 15 miles north effectively cutting us off.

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The water levels are beginning to go down, where the Landrovers are was under water the day before. The previous year when it flooded three Italians in a low loader tried to cross and were washed away and drowned, so not to be treated lightly.

Voigtlander Bessa 1

Barrie
 

grebeman

Old Codgers Group
Not wishing to leave you in such a desolate place a journey a few miles across some trackless country brings you to a limestone escarpment. Look carefully and in two of these images you'll see the remains of stone walls, so someone perhaps lived here at some time. Petra it's not, but it may have been home to someone.

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Jim Synott in shot to give scale

Algeria - Voigtlander Bessa 1

Barrie
 
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Bart J D

Top Veteran
That makes my knees weak just thinking of walking out on that precipice.
I have a really strange reaction to heights.
Outside, nothing bothers me.
While inside, I get a really overwhelming reaction.
I remember when visiting Saint-Pauls Cathedral in London, I hardly could bring myself to glance over the reeling on the inside of the dome.
I would have preferred to get into the wall :eek: I was 17 but just thinking about it, brings back that feeling 😄
Then we went on to the roof and all was well.
In the mountains as well, I wouldn't hesitate to join that kid.
Inside of a building, I get the same feeling of vertigo looking up.

Could be interesting to have this analysed :rolleyes:
 

tonyturley

Legend
Location
Scott Depot, WV, USA
Real Name
Tony
Outside, nothing bothers me.
While inside, I get a really overwhelming reaction.
I'm just the opposite. I can ride a glass elevator or go on the Eiffel Tower reproduction in Cincinnati, Ohio, and I'm fine, because they are enclosed. Go to the edge of a drop-off that's only a few meters in height or look over the railing of the 2nd floor in a parking garage, and my stomach does flip-flops.
 

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