Leica Lens Light Lab

rayvonn

Hall of Famer
Location
London
Lens Light Lab (LLL) is a Chinese company which makes copies of old classic Leica lenses, the type which cost the price of a house in certain parts of the UK. And by all accounts, these copies seem to be of a superb quality, not only in appearance to the originals, but more importantly, rendering. One may not like rendering from over 50 years ago, warts n’all, but if you do, the latest LLL upcoming release, a copy of the original Noctilux 50mm F1.2, may be of interest.


(I wish they did the Noct V4 F1; guess I’ll still have to be saving the pennies for that one)
 
A number of Rangefinder forum members signed up for the LLL 35/2, got burned. I would not put money down until the lens is in production and can be delivered.

It is rumored to cost more than the Voigtlander 50/1 Nokton, which is a superb lens. The 50/1.2 Nokton is under $1000- and has beautiful rendering. I have both of these lenses, and the 50/1.1 Nokton. The latter has gone up in price in the last year.
 

rayvonn

Hall of Famer
Location
London
A number of Rangefinder forum members signed up for the LLL 35/2, got burned. I would not put money down until the lens is in production and can be delivered.

It is rumored to cost more than the Voigtlander 50/1 Nokton, which is a superb lens. The 50/1.2 Nokton is under $1000- and has beautiful rendering. I have both of these lenses, and the 50/1.1 Nokton. The latter has gone up in price in the last year.
I also remember you commenting upon the Voigtlander 50mm F1.1 basically having the same or better optical qualities as the Noctilux F1 which is useful to know.
 
The 50/1.1 Nokton is under-rated, at one time could buy them new for $700. On mine: I added one strip of copper tape for use on the M9. The Nokton was probably optimized for the Zeiss Ikon M-Mount camera. I keep a UV/IR cut filter on mine, the M9 is sensitive to UV and the M8 to IR. This greatly reduces fringing that some have complained about.

Nikki_1.jpg


50/1.1, Wide-Open on the M8.

For the Light Lab Lens: if they are hand polishing the Aspheric Surfaces, expect lots of deviation from lens-to-lens and for the sharpness across the field to vary greatly, as it did on the 1966 Leica lens. Polishing with modern equipment and techniques has produced better lenses.

leica-a.jpg
 
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