Major Chemical Fire

donlaw

Hall of Famer
Sep 14, 2012
124
Texas
Don
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Horrific fire is burning out of control east of Houston. Captured this out the window of my office this morning. Authorities are down playing any danger from the fumes. Could burn for days. We are taking precautions to stay indoors as much as possible. Lucky strong winds aloft are keeping the plume moving at a high level but at some point it is bound to start dropping. Our house is 30+miles away so not too worried, but this has potential to be disastrous for some.
 
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Luke

Super Moderator
Nov 11, 2011
214
Milwaukee, WI USA
Luke
OK. Time for me to invent something and explain to somebody else so they can make it and get rich. It's a giant heavy fireproof blanket...and it will come in sizes as big as need be to cover giant industrial fires. It will come with a set of drones strong enough to life it, fly over the fire and drop to smother the fire. No oxygen means no combustion. Boom. Fire gone.

or that's not really gonna work, because I'm sure if it did someone would have invented it already.

I'd wear a gas mask until the fire is out. Burning chemicals are never good.
 
OK. Time for me to invent something and explain to somebody else so they can make it and get rich. It's a giant heavy fireproof blanket...and it will come in sizes as big as need be to cover giant industrial fires. It will come with a set of drones strong enough to life it, fly over the fire and drop to smother the fire. No oxygen means no combustion. Boom. Fire gone.

or that's not really gonna work, because I'm sure if it did someone would have invented it already.

I'd wear a gas mask until the fire is out. Burning chemicals are never good.
Amen. Especially east of Houston. Some really nasty stuff produced out there. You just had all that stuff in the water; now you get it in the air. Yuck!!
 

tonyturley

Hall of Famer
Nov 24, 2014
124
Scott Depot, WV, USA
Tony
Saw the footage on the news this evening. Back when I was a kid and my dad was a chemical plant operator, the county where our state capital is located was called the Chemical Valley. We had dozens of chemical plants, jobs were plentiful - and our air and streams were majorly polluted. The Cuyahoga River wasn't the only river to catch fire back in the day. Beginning in the 80s, a great many of those jobs and operations were moved to Texas or Michigan. Our chemical industry is only a pale shadow of what it once was, but seeing the news footage leads me to wonder if we are better off.
 

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