Met a photographer the other day.

I met a retired photojournalist / press photographer, he regaled me for 2.5hrs with fantastic stories of his time as a working photographer during film photography's heyday.

He also told me he doesn't understand Lightroom. He joined a local photography club and attended some of their tutorials on processing with LR but he just found it frustrating and fiddly.

He said everyone in the club was very frustrated too.

I said, what - they all didn't get LR too?

He said, no they were frustrated at him because he was the only one who couldn't understand it.

I laughed out loud.

Anyway, he's doing fine. He still shoots film. He's one of those people who instinctively knows the shutter speed and f/stop settings without needing a light meter. Which is why he's thinking of buying a Leica M2 (he currently shoots with a Nikon F2, a Widelux, and Linhof).

That's all, carry on.
 
I met a retired photojournalist / press photographer, he regaled me for 2.5hrs with fantastic stories of his time as a working photographer during film photography's heyday.

He also told me he doesn't understand Lightroom. He joined a local photography club and attended some of their tutorials on processing with LR but he just found it frustrating and fiddly.

He said everyone in the club was very frustrated too.

I said, what - they all didn't get LR too?

He said, no they were frustrated at him because he was the only one who couldn't understand it.

I laughed out loud.

Anyway, he's doing fine. He still shoots film. He's one of those people who instinctively knows the shutter speed and f/stop settings without needing a light meter. Which is why he's thinking of buying a Leica M2 (he currently shoots with a Nikon F2, a Widelux, and Linhof).

That's all, carry on.
Real human connections, in person... There's nothing like those, sometimes. Am I right? We're in real danger of losing sight of that during the present moment. Two years of relative isolation on top of the increasingly detached, internet based lives we seen to all be leading... Sigh.
 
Real human connections, in person... There's nothing like those, sometimes. Am I right? We're in real danger of losing sight of that during the present moment. Two years of relative isolation on top of the increasingly detached, internet based lives we seen to all be leading... Sigh.

That is indeed true. I'd known him from one of my facebook photography groups for a few years when I lived in a different part of the country. I'd spoken to him and he offered to show me the ropes with film developing. I told him I will take him up on that offer if and when I move back to the same state, whenever that would be.

I moved back here about 1.5 yrs ago but because of family commitments and the COVID lockdowns, I never got around to meeting up. But I had a free afternoon a couple of weekends ago so I sent him a msg and I drove 40mins over to this town and we met for the first time.

He was almost apologetic for talking about all his stories for so long but I told him I was living vicariously through his adventures as photojournalist/pressphotographer.

He's invited me over again, and also asked if I would be interested in participating in a pop up photo exhibition with him and his photography buddies, something they might decide to pull off at some point in the future. I showed him some of my photos and he thinks they're pretty good.

Oh, I offered to teach him LR properly and with patience, in exchange for him showing me the ropes with film development and scanning.
 
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Oh, I offered to teach him LR properly and with patience, in exchange for him teaching me the ropes with film development and scanning.

I would like to show him some post-processing because of one of the stories he told me.

He's worked for some of the major papers in the country and on one occasion they sent him to photograph a major horse racing event. He managed to catch a shot of the jockey on his horse with the jockey's wife leaning across the fence with her arm outstretched to him. That shot made the front page of the paper if I recall correctly.

He said he took that shot, sent the film to the paper, they developed it. He said their developers did something to the shot in the way they processed the photo, turning a good shot into a fantastic shot.

Some time later, the wife of the jockey tracked him down and told him how much she loved that shot. She asked if she could have a print of it. So he got the film from the paper and developed it himself but he could never get it to look the way it did in the paper.

I would love to see that shot and I'm sure I could have shown him how to process it in LR.

*trying to recall that story now, I can't remember if he said the developed that film in a specific way or if they scanned the film and then post-processed it digitally before publishing it in the paper.
 
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*trying to recall that story now, I can't remember if he said the developed that film in a specific way or if they scanned the film and then post-processed it digitally before publishing it in the paper.
Well if the film had some special treatment he would have had it also when getting the film from the paper. So probably post processing, and depending on the year probably a scan and then LR. (I guess that papers had gone to digital processing and setting at least by year 2000.)
 
Well if the film had some special treatment he would have had it also when getting the film from the paper. So probably post processing, and depending on the year probably a scan and then LR. (I guess that papers had gone to digital processing and setting at least by year 2000.)

You're probably right. He's pretty handy with film development so he would've been able to work it out if it was something to do with that.
 
I don't know how to say this, but you seem to not understand that once the film is developed you can't change it!
It is a physical process developing film, you can only do it once.

Yes, what agentlossing meant. If it was film-related processing, he would've known how it's done (eg. dodging/burning etc), but he wouldn't have known how to do it in Photoshop or in LR (or whatever the paper was using back then).
 
I well and truly grew up in the film era, but I did not really get into photography until I was much much older and had my own money. This is because as a kid with a film compacts, I knew that film costs money to buy, to develop, and to print from. Every time I pressed the shutter, that's money per click. We weren't that well off when I was younger so I hardly ever pressed that shutter button and hence I never really did much photography to learn anything.

I do remember ruining a whole roll of film one time. I was a kid attending another kid's birthday party, but the lighting conditions in the house were low and every shot came out blurry. My mother (being who she is) said that was embarrassing because she told the kid's mother I'll take photos. I think I never picked up the camera again after that. Not for another 35 years I think, more or less.
 
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I do remember ruining a whole role of film one time. I was a kid attending another kid's birthday party, but the lighting conditions in the house were low and every shot came out blurry. My mother (being who she is) said that was embarrassing because she told the kid's mother I'll take photos. I think I never picked up the camera again after that. Not for another 35 years I think, more or less.
Oh, that's a sad and embarrassing thing to happen in a kid's life, that's a real shame. Those experiences have a really formative influence on a young person's life. At least you picked up the camera again, eventually!

Cost restrictions were unfortunate too, I experienced that as a kid, I think we had a family camera once or twice, some 90s plastic zoom compact, but when those broke we usually had nothing, and then early in my actual interest in taking photos, all I got were some disposables. I finally got a decent digital camera (for the time) when I was 17 or 18, a 3x zoom 2mp Olympus. I definitely used the heck out of that thing, but it's a pity the images were so low resolution, and I often didn't have much storage media.
 
I don't know how to say this, but you seem to not understand that once the film is developed you can't change it!
It is a physical process developing film, you can only do it once.
You can, however, change the look of the final print significantly. But I get your point. I worked in a photo lab once where a women accused of us causing the converging lines she's made with the camera point up at a building. We tried to convince her, showing her the negative, that it wasn't doable, but it was like talking to a wall. The owner final gave her the roll and asked her to go elsewhere in the future.
 
Oh, that's a sad and embarrassing thing to happen in a kid's life, that's a real shame. Those experiences have a really formative influence on a young person's life. At least you picked up the camera again, eventually!

Cost restrictions were unfortunate too, I experienced that as a kid, I think we had a family camera once or twice, some 90s plastic zoom compact, but when those broke we usually had nothing, and then early in my actual interest in taking photos, all I got were some disposables. I finally got a decent digital camera (for the time) when I was 17 or 18, a 3x zoom 2mp Olympus. I definitely used the heck out of that thing, but it's a pity the images were so low resolution, and I often didn't have much storage media.

Sad and embarassing it was.

But re the cost of film - this is why, while I can wholly appreciate and love the fine image quality of film, I am also a huge advocate for digital photography. When I bought my first digital cameras, I could snap away and immediately see the results of my shots and learn from it as I go. My learning and understanding of photography exponentially increased with digital cameras. After the initial outlay for the camera itself and the SD card, I could take as many shots as I want without worrying about cost.

What happened when your family camera broke? Do you feel that you have ample photographs of your family life during those periods?

I have a million photos of my daughter from the moment when she was born through to today (*ok, a quick search shows that I have a total of 8529 photos, she's four and a half). There have been some fantastic photos over the past 4 years. One of my favourites was when we were at the zoo and flying like airplanes:

2022-02-21_07-59-41.jpg


There are absolutely no regrets when you have photos like these.
 
You can, however, change the look of the final print significantly. But I get your point. I worked in a photo lab once where a women accused of us causing the converging lines she's made with the camera point up at a building. We tried to convince her, showing her the negative, that it wasn't doable, but it was like talking to a wall. The owner final gave her the roll and asked her to go elsewhere in the future.

It's crazy to be accused of manipulating the negatives.....!!
 
What happened when your family camera broke? Do you feel that you have ample photographs of your family life during those periods?
No, definitely not. My family seemed strangely averse to photos... A few Olan Mills portraits when myself and first couple siblings were quite young (I was the oldest), but then very, very little. It's really too bad, not having a record of all that time gone by. I don't know what my parents were thinking. Especially since my grandma on my dad's side was a frequent Polaroid user, and my grandpa on my mom's was a genuine photographer. I suppose cost had a lot to do with it, but that doesn't explain it well enough.
 
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