Micro 4/3 Micro 4/3 samples

OK, I'll start scaling them before posting in future!

I like flowers. No, I love flowers! And these M43 cameras and lenses are superb. I started with 35mm film and Fuji STX and Praktica SLRs in the 1970s. This M43 kit and capability feels like magic.
 
I like th

I like this more each time I look. The first thing to catch the eye is the shape of the driftwood, and then I start to see the sky, the weight of it, the patches of rainfall not so far away, the threat and the energy. Then I come back to the foreground and notice the echoes of the shape of the driftwood in the rocks, and the tones in the sea.


Thanks Julian. Appreciate the feedback.
 
Crow, captured in mid-Caw.

EM5_Feb14_24_corvid_on_a_wire#5.jpg
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Taken with an ancient four-thirds Zuiko lens, the 50-200mm (non SWD version) which, to my continued surprise, autofocuses surprisingly quickly with a decent 4/3-M4/3 adapter (mine is a Viltrox).
 
What kind of filter/process do you use for such rendering? I love it :)
Thank you. It's my secret sauce! Actually it's all freely available. I do like SilkyPix for raw conversion from Panasonic Lumix raws, so much that I run a Windows PC just so that I can use SilkyPix. I do know darktable and rawtherapee but for Panasonic raws SilkyPix is rather excellent. Not slick, not fast, but very nicely integrated with the cameras. But for actual editing I run Debian and use GIMP and typically use its GMIC plug-in. There are some really interesting tools in GMIC. It currently has over 600 filters or methods but I regularly use just a handful. Luckily the plug-in allows you to save favourites! I'm attaching a screenshot of my favourites. I very much like the pyramid processing script and use it often and I think always in in conjunction with others. It is really worth spending some hours exploring gmic's capabilities. There is also a standalone GMIC for Windows, Mac and Linux in case you don't want to use it as part of a photo editor. I also use GIMP's regular image editing tools such as layers, layer modes, blur, desaturation, colour inversion, cropping, "straighten and crop" (fabulous gimp script!) and so on.
 

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Crow, captured in mid-Caw.
View attachment 449000

Taken with an ancient four-thirds Zuiko lens, the 50-200mm (non SWD version) which, to my continued surprise, autofocuses surprisingly quickly with a decent 4/3-M4/3 adapter (mine is a Viltrox).
Mine was also on an ancient camera. Lumix DMC-G3 with a Lumix G Vario 45-150. The first day I tried out my new lens!
 

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Thank you. It's my secret sauce! Actually it's all freely available. I do like SilkyPix for raw conversion from Panasonic Lumix raws, so much that I run a Windows PC just so that I can use SilkyPix. I do know darktable and rawtherapee but for Panasonic raws SilkyPix is rather excellent. Not slick, not fast, but very nicely integrated with the cameras. But for actual editing I run Debian and use GIMP and typically use its GMIC plug-in. There are some really interesting tools in GMIC. It currently has over 600 filters or methods but I regularly use just a handful. Luckily the plug-in allows you to save favourites! I'm attaching a screenshot of my favourites. I very much like the pyramid processing script and use it often and I think always in in conjunction with others. It is really worth spending some hours exploring gmic's capabilities. There is also a standalone GMIC for Windows, Mac and Linux in case you don't want to use it as part of a photo editor. I also use GIMP's regular image editing tools such as layers, layer modes, blur, desaturation, colour inversion, cropping, "straighten and crop" (fabulous gimp script!) and so on.
Thanks! This is appreciated 😀

I do have a dual boot system with Linux and Windows 11. Bookmarking the information 😀
 
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