Minolta AL-E, removing Top Cover to clean the Viewfinder.

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This camera was released in 1965 (another source stated 1968) , did not have a long run. It features a 40mm F1.8 lens, 6 elements in 4 groups. It is slightly larger than the Canonet QL17GIII. The viewfinder is auto-parallax corrected, with projected brightlines. The camera has full manual operation, and shutter-preferred automatic. The battery has corroded the chamber on this one, but cleaned up nicely. I have some batteries on order.

This is a nicely made, compact camera. 2020 resolution- shoot some film.

This one was more difficult than the HM-9 to clean the viewfinder. Putting new light seals was easy, the HM-9 gave me a fit. My "goto" seal that has worked for me for 30 years caused the back on the HM-9 to jam. I use a self-sticking "foamie" sheet. Worked on the AL-E, the HM-9 demanded Velvet.

You may not be able to see a difference- but the finder is now crystal clear, the dirt/grime is out of the nooks and crannies, and the seals have been replaced.

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And I thought Minolta did not make a small full-frame camera until the HiMatic-E came out. The latter develops a LOT of problems in the electronics.
This AL-E is beautiful, solidly made, mechanical camera. Much better construction than the over-priced HiMatic 7s-II, which I also have. The AL-E and Canonet QL-17L (and GIII) represent the "Silver Age" of fixed-lens RF cameras.
 
The PX-625a batteries arrived- I half suspected the meter was out on this one, given the corrosion in the compartment. It was.

I removed the bottom cover, found the wire from the negative terminal to the meter was off. Lots of corrosion, the lead was also heavily corroded.
Exacto knife used to cut-back the now too short wire, bent the lead downward to give enough slack for the remaining wire to be reattached. Used a soldering iron to reconnect the wire, very tight space to work in. Had to use a screw driver and fine tweezers to get the "blue" wire up onto the terminal. Third attempt was the charm- meter now working.

I'm not very good at soldering- ends up looking like a 1960s transistor radio when I finish.
 

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