Nikon My Z 6 has taken over my bag

Location
Boston Burbs
Real Name
David
.....
I can't really say how people coming from other brands will find the Z 6, though. I've owned Nikon cameras since the late 1980s - for me, the Z line feels like a natural progression (and yes, an improvement on almost all fronts). But people who have owned other mirrorless cameras might feel differently. YMMV!
.....
I have a similar feeling.

Nikon did a great job of creating an evolutionary body for their semi-pro cameras in terms of handling. If you've shot almost any Nikon in the last 15-20 years the controls will look, feel, and function pretty much like you expect (pro or semi pro). And if you've gotten use to Nikon's "where did they move that button" over the years, even those changes won't confuse for long.
 
Location
Switzerland
Real Name
Matt
Sony had better get around to introducing the A7IV quickly or I may pick up a Z5 with a 50mm prime to try out the Z system. It's not that I need the latest and greatest, it's that I want better weather resistance in a full-frame camera. My A7III is a great camera overall but it has the older Sony interpretation of WR. I almost picked up an A7rIV but 61mp is too much.
If weather resistance is key, I'd opt for the Z 6 over the Z 5 - they're virtually the same size and weight, but the Z 5's weather resistance (like the Z 50's) is just a little less impressive and confidence-inspiring - the built-in flash creates additional entry points for moisture, apparently. The Z 6's sealing is impeccable - I've used it in all kinds of weather, even in driving rain and snow. I trust it even more than the Olympus E-M5 III ...

M.
 

donlaw

Hall of Famer
Location
Texas
Real Name
Don
Don, just to mention it: If you're into moving subjects, the Z 6 II is the better choice.

I can't really say how people coming from other brands will find the Z 6, though. I've owned Nikon cameras since the late 1980s - for me, the Z line feels like a natural progression (and yes, an improvement on almost all fronts). But people who have owned other mirrorless cameras might feel differently. YMMV!

And as for the size thing, yes, that's definitely true - but that's where the Z 50 comes in and does a much better job than I ever hoped it would. Did I mention that the files coming from the Z 50 comfortably match or beat those coming from the Sony A7 II at higher ISOs?

For the record: At the moment, all other systems I currently own (with the notable exception of the M mount) are on the line - however, I don't think I'll find anything that can fully replace my :mu43: gear any time soon, especially the Olympus E-M5 III, and also the small, fast primes and wonderfully compact, weather-sealed zooms. And even though I prefer the shooting experience of the Fujifilm X-E3 over that of the Panasonic GX9, the latter isn't a worse camera - in many respects, the opposite is true.

So, my Sony and Fuji stuff, as much as I like some of it in some ways, is practically on its way out (with Sony leading the way). The Z 40mm and Z 28mm will replace the Sigma 45mm f/2.8 and Samyang 35mm f/2.8 (and make the Sony A7 II and the A6000 redundant - finally), the Z 28mm can also replace the Fujifilm 27mm ... Yes, the Z 50 with the 28mm will be bigger than the Fujifilm X-E3 with the 27mm, but not decisively so. For everything else, I'm already well served by what's available, especially if I keep :mu43:: The one lens I can't seem to see anything on the horizon to replace it with in Z land is the Fujifilm 23mm f/2 - but then, the Panasonic 15mm f/1.7 pretty much matches that lens's output and is the more consistent performer (the 23mm is really pretty weak at close range, the 15mm is solid).

I didn't mention it here (much), but I've done shootouts with many of the lenses and bodies I own over the last couple of weeks to see which of my secondary systems delivered what Nikon couldn't and :mu43: wouldn't; what you've just read is kind of a summary: Only some small primes seem to be hard to replace at the moment; specifically, the Nikon Z lenses match or beat their Fujifilm counterparts in all respects but size.

M.
Matt, I too have used Nikon for film and digital and don’t really need the fastest AF. Once you know the Nikon UI, it is easy to adapt to almost any of their enthusiast level cameras.
Like you, I have a M43 and M system. After almost letting M43 go, I ended up finding renewed interest with the PenF. When it initially came out, I wasn’t really interested but I got one for bargain price at an Olympus outlet sales. My renewed M43 interest last year has me thinking about the Olympus E5 III.
Most likely will keep the M10P and original Monochrom for the foreseeable future. But, I have been tempted to pick up the M10M or the QM.

My collection of many older Nikkor lenses could find renewed use with the Z format.
I haven’t had a new Nikon body since the df. So out of the three systems, the Nikon Z6 seems most likely my next camera. There is great pricing for a Z6 with kit lens right now too.
 

Biro

Hall of Famer
Location
Jersey Shore
Real Name
Steve
If weather resistance is key, I'd opt for the Z 6 over the Z 5 - they're virtually the same size and weight, but the Z 5's weather resistance (like the Z 50's) is just a little less impressive and confidence-inspiring - the built-in flash creates additional entry points for moisture, apparently. The Z 6's sealing is impeccable - I've used it in all kinds of weather, even in driving rain and snow. I trust it even more than the Olympus E-M5 III ...

M.
Matt... I was just checking in a few places: The Z5 doesn't have a built-in flash. Nonetheless, I'll take your words under advisement.
 
Location
Switzerland
Real Name
Matt
Matt... I was just checking in a few places: The Z5 doesn't have a built-in flash. Nonetheless, I'll take your words under advisement.
Gosh, my bad ... I obviously did remember it wrongly! Thanks for crosschecking my information, good on you! What I said only applies to the Z 50, then.

Nikon Z5 review: the best value stills-oriented full-framer <- for future reference (look at the "Cons"!)

Sorry about this.

M.
 

pictogramax

All-Pro
Location
Zemun, Serbia
I didn't mention it here (much), but I've done shootouts with many of the lenses and bodies I own over the last couple of weeks to see which of my secondary systems delivered what Nikon couldn't and :mu43: wouldn't;
@MoonMind
Matt, you do understand it's such a big teaser? And that we are, or at least I am, really curious to see some of those comparisons?
 

mnhoj

gee aahrr
Location
Los Angeles
Real Name
John
Looks like Z has taken over my bag too.
I can actually see the Z5 staying there for quite awhile too.
Just found an 85mm S to replace the G.
Times are good.
 
Location
Switzerland
Real Name
Matt
@MoonMind
Matt, you do understand it's such a big teaser? And that we are, or at least I am, really curious to see some of those comparisons?
Sorry - but I wasn't doing this in any way systematically; most shots during these comparisons weren't worth showing because I tried to make the lenses show their strengths and weaknesses, not frame up something worthwhile. I usually only post shots I like, not stuff I just took to check something ...

If you're interested in something specific, I can redo some of it or search for it in the archives, but I'm definitely not a reviewer in the usual sense - I lack the patience for that; I much prefer shooting over testing gear. I'm just interested in knowing the limits of the gear I have - and often check rumors or review results agaings my own experience, that's all.

My take-away: I probably shouldn't have mentioned it ;)

However, now that it's out, just point me at a specific piece of information you'd like illustrated, and I'll try to provide it as soon as time allows - sadly, not in the next couple of weeks; I'll have to shoot to relax, not to do anything requiring planning and conscientiousness (it's finals time for my students and me).

Anyhow, the main lens thing (Fujifilm 23mm f/2 against Nikon Z 35mm f/1.8) should be pretty easy to show - I may even find the files; I can also redo the Fujifilm 90mm f/2 against the Nikon Z 85mm f/1.8 (on the Z 50) and Sony Zeiss 55mm f/1.8 against Z 50mm f/1.8 (on the Sony A7 II and Z 6 respectively) without much of a fuss (just be aware that the Sony lens is scheduled to be sold - as is the camera, but with a bit more of a delay on that because it's my base for the Sigma 45mm f/2.8). I'll keep the Fujifilm gear around for a couple of months at least anyway, so come summer, a lot more is possible.

Oh, and I definitely can redo the Fujifilm 35mm f/1.4 against Panasonic 25mm f/1.4 II comparison - that was an interesting one, mostly because both lenses are "classic" lenses to some degree, with visible aberrations, but both still quite capable. Not to put too fine a point on it, the Nikon Z 35mm f/1.8 on the Z 50 *smokes* both of them in terms of technical IQ, even though it's not completely free of little downfalls itself - I'm completely fine with that, by the way, it's not a $2000 dollar lens. But its superiority in this direct comparison was really impressive - as it should be, what with the lens being slower and twice the size.

That said, I adore the look you can get with the Fujifilm 35mm, and the Panasonic 25mm is a neat lens with great weather resistance that allows me to go out with a superbly light, yet reliable kit in really bad weather. The E-M5 III/25mm II kit only weighs 60% of what the Z 6 with Z 50mm f/1.8 does, and it fits into smaller bags ... Between getting out and getting shots or staying in and sulking, I'll take a little hit on IQ every time (and it's a *small* one, no pun intended here).

For the high ISO stuff between the A7 II and Z 50, please refer to DPReview's studio scene comparison - I frankly hate doing that stuff. I ended up with comparable images more or less accidentally (thanks in part to the Z 50 slow kit lens and fiddling around with both cameras late one evening). Anyway, what I saw was *lots* of heavy chrominance noise from the A7 II, with loss of detail and colour accuracy LOST, against a much more subtle pattern from the Z 50, with better detail retention and massively better colour reproduction, both at ISO 3200. But don't take my word for that - there are fantastic resources online for that kind of comparison. It was obvious enough, though ... and using the Sony 55mm f/1.8 and the Nikon Z 35mm f/1.8, I could try and create some sort of equal ground for another test ... I'm not asking you to not make me do it, I just hope you don't :p

M.

EDIT: Had to edit for one major mistake!
 

William Lewis

Veteran
Location
Hayward WI
Real Name
William Lewis
I will admit that in the past couple of weeks I was considering a Z5 with the "kit" zoom and an FTZ adaptor but my desire for a Leica won out in the end. But I do love Nikon and if I decide to leave DSLR's behind completely, I could see going to the Z system at that point. This thread certainly hasn't made my desire for one any less :laugh:
 
Location
Central Florida
Real Name
Timothy Williams
I have added the Nikon Z50. I skipped the kit as I already have the Nikon 16-80 2.8-4E and 11-16 Tokina 2.8 , both DX lenses and it can share the Nikon 70-200 and 70-300 on the top end. The Tokina worked with autofocus on my Z6, hoping it does the same on the Z50. Still looking into the Z 6ii.
 

pictogramax

All-Pro
Location
Zemun, Serbia
@MoonMind Thank you, Matt. I thought you have the comparative samples already at hand so it would be easy to share them; no way I would ask you for a dedicated shoot-out just to satisfy my curiosity. There are samples to be found on Flickr or else, so your comments are actually more valuable in the end, and you provided great insight already. I'm kind of toying with the idea of updating the M43 side of my gear (I have Pana G3 with it's kit lens and some adapters for manual glass I use mostly), for the compactness of camera body paired with leading IBIS (thinking of Oly M5II). So I was wondering if I might be going crazy, (re)jumping on board when the M43 train might be going over the cliff to oblivion. But I never owned latest and greatest anyhow :)
 
Location
Switzerland
Real Name
Matt
@MoonMind Thank you, Matt. I thought you have the comparative samples already at hand so it would be easy to share them; no way I would ask you for a dedicated shoot-out just to satisfy my curiosity. There are samples to be found on Flickr or else, so your comments are actually more valuable in the end, and you provided great insight already. I'm kind of toying with the idea of updating the M43 side of my gear (I have Pana G3 with it's kit lens and some adapters for manual glass I use mostly), for the compactness of camera body paired with leading IBIS (thinking of Oly M5II). So I was wondering if I might be going crazy, (re)jumping on board when the M43 train might be going over the cliff to oblivion. But I never owned latest and greatest anyhow :)
Milan, honestly, I'll gladly dig up some samples as soon as time allows (or actually re-shoot stuff - I should really get into the habit of *showing* what I see); it's just not feasible for the next couple of weeks, until finals are over (mid June), and maybe a couple of weeks after that, depending on how much I have to postpone during examinations. But over the summer, I'll be able to do lots of shooting (I'm really looking forward to it, too), and apart from the sensor stuff, I actually don't mind.

As for :mu43:, I'm constantly amazed how well those bodies live up to my expectations; the 16MP sensors were very good, the 20MP sensors are better - that's why I'd recommend looking into cameras that actually have them; even the slightly older variants in the Pen-F and GX8 do just fine; everything newer basically uses the same hardware, so you can pick your poison freely. The E-M5 II you mention certainly sits at a sweet spot as far as the 16MP models are concerned - and it's one of Olympus' most well-received models. I'm happy with the E-M5 III, though - and find it to be exactly what I wanted, small, tactile, with impressive performance; I don't mind the slightly more "plasticky" shell - it's not bad at all, in fact, and I trust it as far as I trust the Nikon Z 6 in terms of sealing and functionality. It's true that it's a little flimsier than the E-M5 II, though - and of course, the Z 6's built quality is superior. I wonder if I find the courage to pit the Z 50 against the E-M5 III in terms of weather resistance, though - I doubt the Z 50 is the equal of the Olympus in that respect.

To put that into perspective: I'm currently putting the G1X III to the test - I never was sure about the extend of its sealing, but I have only use for that camera if I can take it out in all weather I'm willing to face - apart from its size, it's a bag of clever, but nevertheless tangible compromises. So far, so good - but a Nikon Z 6 this is not, and neither is it an Olympus OM-D E-M5 *. It's (jacket) pocketable, though, even with the hood I need in wet weather ...

M.
 

agentlossing

All-Pro
Location
S. Oregon Coast (the Northernmost-Cal of them All)
Real Name
Andrew Lossing
M4/3 won't go away unless it doesn't get a sensor update in another few years, which I think it will, but sensor tech isn't developing at lightning speeds anymore so the gap between M4/3 and other systems isn't widening that quickly. It's just a matter of M4/3 catching up to where other tech that sells better has come to - Sony pushing the envelope with sensors EXCEPT with M4/3, because they don't make M4/3 cameras, has led to the state of the system currently: quite decent sensors, but no class leading capabilities. That's where the other aspects of the system have to make up for it: IBIS, small sharp lenses, overall compactness. The EM5ii keeps beckoning to me, too...
 
Location
Switzerland
Real Name
Matt
The E-M5.2 is a great feeling and handling camera. So good the E-M10.3 almost copies it.

With all the talk about the feel and build of the E-M5.3 and Z50, @MoonMind how do they compare to the GX85/GX9 or X-E3? I never had any issues with the build or feel of my GX85 or X-E3.
The E-M5 III has the best grip of all E-M5 models so far - it almost (but not quite) feels as good as my favourite :mu43: body, the E-M10 with additional grip. Ironically, I can't seem to like the huge additional grip for the E-M5 III, but truth be told, I also think I'd only need it with really big lenses - which I don't own at the moment and have no real intention of getting (I bought it for the 12-40mm f/2.8 - but I don't feel it's more desirable than the ungripped body). In the hand, the E-M5 III feels much more secure than the GX9 - I find the grip on that camera surprisingly comfortable, but it definitely doesn't provide much support because it's quite slippery. The GX9 has actually slipped out of my grip once, thankfully, it didn't fall far and hit a bag instead of the floor. The X-E3's grip is much more helpful than the one on the GX9 - I feel I can carry the camera with the 90mm f/2 securely in one hand (not that I think that that's a good idea - but it's possible).

All that said, the GX9 and X-E3 are as well made as the E-M5 III, possibly better in some places; both feel solid and dense. The E-M5 III does have some weak points, the most prominent being the power switch that actually feels as if it might break off all too easily. As far as I remember it, that wasn't the case on the E-M5 II - from memory, the switch felt sturdy. But I don't think the placement of the switch is a good idea anyway, because it basically precludes using the camera one-handed; you can swap the on-off function to the small switch on the right, but that feels even less confidence-inspiring. However, that's it for "flimsiness" - the rest of the camera feels superbly well put together, and, crucially, the dials are great.

Finally, the Z 50 beats all other models mentioned here - it's by far the most comfortable in the hand, I can balance and shoot the 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6E on the FTZ one-handed (again, not something I'd do or recommend, but I tried, and it worked). There's simply no contest. That said, the dials are a bit stickier than I'd like, especially the front dial - but in use, I hardly notice that.

There are other factors to determine user experience - but in the hand, the Z 50 is the best of the lot, the E-M5 III has the most tactile dials (but the worst switches :rolleyes:), the X-E3 sports the joystick, the GX9 the tilting EVF (not that I use it much). The E-M5 III's flip screen is something I clearly prefer, but I know that many people don't. Since I don't use the screen a lot, the EVF is much more important for me - again, the Z 50 wins, but the E-M5 III and X-E3 aren't far behind (with the E-M5 III being a tiny bit better than the X-E3, but YMMV). The GX9's EVF is ... underwhelming, to say the least.

But perhaps the best indicator of "feel in hand" is that I don't hesitate to use the E-M5 III in any weather and in all conditions - over all other models mentioned. This camera can take everything I care to throw at it, I'm absolutely convinced. I'm not yet sure I'd treat the Z 50 with quite the same level of confidence ... The GX9 and X-E3 can't compete here, and the Z 6 is - even better still ...

M.
 
Last edited:

yomanuel

New Member
I bought my Z6 a few months ago and I have only used it with my leica M lenses. I am happy with the results and because I am light in weight. I still have the Df but I'm thinking of looking for another home for it.
 

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