Sony Need help with opinions on a shot

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I'm trying to replicate a label shot for a box for my latest train locomotive acquisition.
I'm working on getting the 'shot' portion of the label.
Here is a really bad photo crop of what I'm trying to make for my box which is missing the flap that would have the label on it from the factory.
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Here are two versions of my shot of the engine.
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I know the white background doesn't cover the whole scene and I'll reshoot it with a larger back drop if you all think it's the better shot.
Which should I go with?
 
The last picture is actually a white background. I do have a grey one, maybe I should try it.
These are SOOC with only cropping no PP for the most part.
 
Here is the black background shot worked as best I can in my most sophisticated program I have for altering photos. I'm usually a SOOC shooter.
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I'll give the white background shot a try next.
 
So, the label has a white background which may be why you would gravitate toward that. I'd say whichever you like better go with that.

On the comment of the detail not coming through on the front of the train on the black background - I get that and agree. What may help is sneaking a flash back there and popping off just enough to backlight or rim light it. Maybe even experiment with popping the flash on the backdrop and see if you like that.
 
I don't have any flashes available any more as I gave my only one to my sister when I sent my D7000 to her down in Australia. These photos were all taken with available light from the front and side window of my, uh, studio such as it is.
Studio shot.JPG
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I hold the back drop up using a yard stick that it's clamped to, and fire the shutter with my IR remote. High tech on the cheap I like to say.
 
Here's my latest effort at PP and light from the front window and door only. None from the front end of the loco except for reflected off the wall.
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With the reduction in size that'll be required to fit the label, I don't think I need to worry about much more definition on the front details.
 
I made a sweep/scoop out of plumbing pipes and fittings for photographing my wife's artworks (fairly small pieces).

However, I also bought a set of three studio strobes for just that purpose.

A photo of my typical setup on the dining room table.

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Lots more images and examples here:

Studio light setup and examples
 
Since I had the 'studio' set up already, I did some simple light painting last night once it got dark outside and I could get the room dark easily. Had the TV on but it wasn't that much of a factor IMO.
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I need to work out a different way to hold the back drop up as it doesn't quite clear the top of the image frame when cropped.
 
Changed the back drop to grey, switched off the stabilization and noise reduction in camera, cranked down the aperture to f18 and this is what I got.
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Indirect lighting from the semi-closed blinds on the front windows only.
SOOC except for cropping.
Did I tell you I was having fun?
Thanks for letting me share.
 
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Changed the back drop to grey, switched off the stabilization and noise reduction in camera, cranked down the aperture to f18 and this is what I got.
View attachment 413426
Indirect lighting from the semi-closed blinds on the front windows only.
SOOC except for cropping.
Did I tell you I was having fun?
Thanks for letting me share.
I didn't buy the studio strobes until I spent about 4 hours getting one halfway decent shot of one single piece of my wife's ceramics ... That was using the light tent and three (?) flashes + on-camera flash.

After I got the studio strobes, I could do about 40-50 pieces in that time, and with better results.
 
John - I have a flood light I use when photographing my wife's quilts. It's a little much to set up just for these shots and I enjoy using the available light and trying to get the shot to look good. I'm retired with nothing better to do with my time. What can I say?
I do have an idea for making a cool shot of the locomotive that I'm going to work on today.
 
Continuing to experiment here a little. I can't seem to find the old program that I could smear the edges of a cut 'n paste section of a photo with. Capturing smoke at the same exposure level as the rest of the back drop is proving problematical.
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