Newbie shooting with Nikon D3300

eyeshoot84

New Member
Jan 8, 2016
3
Hello all....I am new to photography. I won't pretend to know the ins and outs,however I do really want to learn. I just shoot from the heart... But here are some shots ive done and edited, please give me some feedback.





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rayvonn

All-Pro
Jan 19, 2015
124
Hello, and welcome to the forum, I think this is the right place to come and enquire, you will generally get helpful and more importantly, constructive feedback. Your D5300 is a great camera to start with.

I think the photos are interesting enough without needing the editing you've applied - I'd like to see how they were before they were edited. I suspect they'd be more interesting and in my opinion, as long as it was taken right, then the more interesting the photo, the less editing it will need. But that's only my opinion. This is a very subjective game and what matters is what YOU like.

In order to provide us with further information which can help us to help you, it would be useful if you could let us know the following:

What camera did you own before buying your D5300?;
Did you edit those images in camera or with external software?; and
Are you self learning photography or going to external groups/classes?

With that camera you've got, it'd definitely be worth getting familiar with all of it's controls and understanding what they do, in particular shutter speed, iso and aperture. I think the in camera guides should help you greatly.
 
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eyeshoot84

New Member
Jan 8, 2016
3
Hello,and thank you. Well this is my first DSLR,

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rayvonn

All-Pro
Jan 19, 2015
124
Ok, well I agree with what bluzcity/Brent said so if you get the time, have a look at what that first image (with the bike) looks like before the processing and also process another copy of it, just black & white, see what you think & let us know. If you can post those images here, even better.
 

KillRamsey

Super Moderator
Jun 20, 2012
124
Hood River, OR
Kyle
You'll probably find a gentle but persistent thread here of people urging you to think about / develop / talk about composition and exposure (call it the basics of photography, if you want), and putting the processing end at the back of the line for a little while. The reason is that, if you get yourself to a place where you can make beautiful compositions, or catch fleeting emotional moments, and THEN apply strong processing skills to those images, you come out miles ahead of someone who never learned to "see" well, and only really got good at post processing. And make no mistake - Composition is a deceptively difficult thing to develop, which is why those really great photographers are so great, and so rare. But everything great is usually also hard to do. :)
 
D

dalethorn

Guest
Hello all....I am new to photography. I won't pretend to know the ins and outs,however I do really want to learn. I just shoot from the heart... But here are some shots ive done and edited, please give me some feedback.
View attachment 25677View attachment 25678View attachment 25679
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I don't think you need to change anything - these look great. But as you go along and accumulate more experience and skill, your results will become more polished. But more polished isn't always better, so be sure that 6 months from now your photos are at least as good as these.
 

rayvonn

All-Pro
Jan 19, 2015
124
Well, when I first saw this picture, I noted that the composition/framing was fine but also noted the darks of the tyres, handlebars and lines of the shirt and the whites of the wheel, and white lines of the bricks. So my first thought was that these blacks and whites might be emphasised better via a b&w image, so to demonstrate this to you, see the edit below. All I did was convert this to B&W and applied a few very minor adjustments (exposure, contrast and highlights). I also applied a little vignetting to emphasise the little lad who after all is the main subject of the picture. This would take you 30 seconds to do in any photo editing software and no presets have been used which I think results in a more natural (realistic?) image. Let me know if this makes sense!



I'll let other forum members chime in relation to your other images, but would just add in relation to the flower shot, the camera appears to have incorrectly focused on the pot and not the flower. As you get used to the camera, you'll know to focus manually on the flower petals so as to bring out their detail.
 
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