Micro 4/3 Panasonic's in-camera Monochrome filter/s

Location
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Name
Miguel Tejada-Flores
Another from the GX9 + PL15 in l.monochrome.d --- of the Boneyard Beer (an appropriate name, given the cool artwork this Bend, Oregon brewery comes up with!) 6-pack I just bought---

GX9_June11_21_Hop_Venom.jpg
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Location
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Name
Miguel Tejada-Flores
A few more photos taken with the GX9's in-camera l.monochrome.d filter, of an old (and abandoned) Dodge truck that sits outside a small Oregon town near where I live. Most taken with the wider angle of my 12-35mm Lumix zoom.

GX9_Jan4_22_Dodge_Truck_front#4.jpg
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Moving in for a different angle---

GX9_Jan4_22_Dodge_Truck_front#3.jpg
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And finally two shots taken from closer, opposite sides---

GX9_Jan4_22_Dodge_Truck_front#2.jpg
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And this from the other side---

GX9_Jan4_22_Dodge_Truck_front#1.jpg
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I have to admit the obvious: I love the way this camera renders black and white with l.monochrome.d
 

Iron

All-Pro
Location
New Zealand
Name
Tímo
This is the original SooC shot of this stream. I used Dynamic Monochrome and realised that Panasonic B&W in-camera filters have the same colour tones/warmth across their models. The mid-tones here are pronounced but not as much as with L.Monochrome.D in the later models. The shadows are definitely darken in L.Monochrome.D. I noticed, though, that Dynamic Monochrome tends to darken the shadows a bit more vs other profiles when the highlights and shadows are both on the extreme end.

P1250635.jpg
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Brownie

Top Veteran
It's clear that the monochrome modes in Panasonic cameras were styled to replicate B&W film with a color filter. I've wondered before what it would be like shooting digital with a color filter in place... I might give it a try with the GF7, currently the only Panasonic left in the house, in a couple days.
Isn't the 'L' variant meant to mimic Leica's look? In the G9 you can go into the settings and add color filters like red, orange, etc.
 
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Iron

All-Pro
Location
New Zealand
Name
Tímo
Isn't the 'L' variant meant to mimic Leica's look? In the G9 you can go into the settings and add color filters like red, orange, etc.
According to the manual, it's supposed to mean low-key and the d in l.monochrome.d is supposed to represent dynamic or dynamic impression.

Here's the excerpt showing the difference in Panasonic's monochrome modes.
1643854796831.png
 
Location
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Name
Miguel Tejada-Flores
There are a small handful of articles which profile Takayuki Tochio, the Panasonic image engineer who, according to many accounts, was the person singlehandedly responsible for the creation, development, and algorithmic implementation of the l.monochrome.d mode. Tochio has said in interviews that his initial process involved buying an old Pentax film camera, and shooting a lot of Tri-X 400, which he then developed and printed on various papers. In another interview, he said: "In order to understand the tone of black-and-white film, I bought film, took photos and printed it, and analyzed the printed matter and film from both sides. I have made various discoveries. In particular, I have learned from my experience that the impression and performance of monochrome depends largely on the way it is printed on photographic paper, rather than film development. Therefore, I decided not only to refer to the film itself, but also various photo books to design the image quality." He also added, "...compared to L. Monochrome, L. Monochrome D emphasizes the tones of highlights and shadows, while adjusting the overall balance of halftones to create a sense of three-dimensionality."

As someone who, in my analog film years, literally shot dozens and probably hundreds of rolls of Tri-X 400, which I developed and printed on a variety of papers, what Mr. Tochio said, resonates with me. It also partially explains my own fascination with this particular in-camera picture mode.
 

Iron

All-Pro
Location
New Zealand
Name
Tímo
Tochio has said in interviews that his initial process involved buying an old Pentax film camera, and shooting a lot of Tri-X 400, which he then developed and printed on various papers.
When I first saw l.monochrome.d, I realised, too, that Tri-X 400 is the closest film to it, then I read your post, searched Tochio's transcript and said to myself, "Oh, that's why!"

RawTherapee has a good Tri-X 400 film simulation. I will try to compare a processed ones to some SooC images I took when I had the GX9.
 
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